C ontents may Events



Yüklə 66,91 Kb.

tarix31.07.2018
ölçüsü66,91 Kb.


 

C



ONTENTS

 

 



May Events 

 

Friday, 2

nd

 May 2014 



Book Launch 

‘After Lermontov: Poems for the 

bicentenary’ 

 

Thursday, 8



th

 May 2014  

Gasan Guseinov, ‘Developments in 

Russian political language’ 



 

Thursday, 15

th

 May 2014 



Cathy Ratcliff, ‘Freedom as 

Development - Seeing Africa in Soviet 

Times, through Pravda’ 

 

Thursday, 22

nd

 May 2014  



Yulia Lukyanova,

 

‘Problematizing 'being 



political' in Russia - evidence from talk-

in-interaction’ 

 

Friday, 23



rd

 May 2014 

International Conference 

‘Russia as a Value Centre: 

Contemporary Russian Identity and Soft 

Power’ 


 

 

 

To become a friend of the 

Dashkova Centre please contact 

Dashkova.Centre@ed.ac.uk

 

 



 

May Events 

The  Dashkova  Centre’s  May  programme  began  with  a  book 

launch  and  poetry  evening  and  ended  with  an  international 

conference  organised  in  conjunction  with  the  University’s 

New Centre for Cultural Relations.  

Book Launch 

 

On  2


nd

  May,  in  connection  with  the  Scottish  Poetry  Library, 

the  Dashkova  Centre  hosted  a  book  launch  for  the  bilingual 

volume  After  Lermontov:  Poems  for  the  Bicentenary.  The 

publication was planned to mark the bi-centenary of the birth 

T

HE 

P

RINCESS 

D

ASHKOVA 

R

USSIAN 

C

ENTRE

 

J

UNE 

2014

 

N

EWSLETTER

 

 

 Robyn Marsak and Andrei Pritsepov 




 

of  the  renowned  Russian  poet  Mikhail  Lermontov,  and  to  celebrate  the  poet’s  cultural  ties  with 



Scotland. The launch was attended by the Russian Consul General Andrei Pritsepov, who opened 

the evening with an address stressing the need to maintain cultural links between Russia and the 

West,  particularly  given  the  current 

political  situation.  After  this  the 

editors  of  the  book,  Peter  France 

and  Robyn  Marsak  introduced  the 

project and spoke of their desire to 

bring Lermontov’s poetry to a wider 

audience. 

number 



of  the 

contributing  poets  were  then 

invited  to  read  a  selection  of  the 

poems  from  the  book,  some  in 

English,  and  some  in  Scots.  The 

poems were also read in Russian by 

colleagues  of  the  Dashkova  centre, 

so  that  the  audience  were  able  to 

compare  the  translations  with  the 

originals.  A  very  enjoyable  evening 

was  rounded  up  by  a  musical 

performance  of  a  romance  written 

to Lermontov’s lyrics. 

 

Dashkova Research Seminar 

On  8


th

  May,  Gasan  Guseinov,  Professor  at  the 

National  Research  University  -  Higher  School  of 

Economics  (Moscow),  presented  a  research 

seminar  on  developments  in  the  Russian  political 

language  and the new vocabulary  arising  from the 

Russian-Ukrainian  conflict.  Professor  Guseinov 

argued  that  Soviet  discourse  and  Russian 

imperialist  discourse  have  been  synthesized  to 

form a new type of post-Soviet imperial discourse, 

which  is  being  used  in  order  to  justify  Russian 

actions  in  Ukraine.  Professor  Guseinov  noted  a 

number of “unsolved problems” currently affecting 

Russian  political  discourse:  the  fact  that  Soviet 

political  discourse  has  entered  everyday  language  and  is  used  in  an  unthinking  way;  the 

“mirroring” of western formulas – such as “president” or “democracy”, which while they resemble 

western concepts, are actually understood differently when used in relation to Russia; and the use 

on the Internet of “uncensored” language which introduces a harsh, aggressive tone into everyday 

political discourse. He also looked at how current negative attitudes to Russian language policy in 

Ukraine are a response to a historical legacy of restrictions on Ukrainian language. 



Alexander Hutchison reads Lermontov’s poem 

Gasan Guseinov 


 

Postgraduate Research Seminars 

On  15

th

  May,  Cathy  Ratcliff,  a 



postgraduate 

student 


in 

Russian 


Language  Studies  at  the  University  of 

Edinburgh, 

presented 

research 



seminar  outlining  findings  from  her 

research  into  the  representation  of 

Africa  in  Soviet  newspapers  from  the 

period  between  1925  and  2011.  In  her 

presentation,  she  argued  that  the 

representation  of  Africa  in  the  Soviet 

press  at  this  time  differs  considerably 

from  that  of  the  Western  press  at  the 

same  period,  in  which  a  more 

colonialist, 

paternalist 

attitude 

is 

evident.  Papers  such  as  Pravda 



portrayed  Africa  as  an  active  subject, 

and  a  strong  emphasis  was  placed  on  workers’  rights  and  the  socialist  movement.  Moreover, 

parallels  were  drawn  in  Soviet  news  reports  between  the  development  of  the  Soviet  Union  and 

that  of  Africa.  This  identification  with  Africa  was  not  a  feature  of  western  news  reports  of  the 

same period. These generally represented Africa as a cultural “other”, requiring aid from the West. 

 

Another  postgraduate  research  seminar 



took  place  on  22

nd

  May.  This  time  the 



subject  was  the  problematization  of  “being 

political”  in  Russia.  The  speaker  was  Yulia 

Lukyanova, 

a  PhD 


student 

in  the 


Department of Psychology studying identity 

studies,  discursive  psychology/conversation 

analysis  and  social  theories  of  collective 

action. Lukyanova presented the findings of 

a  number  of  interviews  with  political 

protestors  in  Russia  in  order  to  study  the 

psychology  of  political  protest.  She  argued 

that  many  opposition  protesters  in  Russia 

do  not  overtly  identify  themselves  as 

political,  but  that  actually  this  attitude 

masked  an  intense  interest  in  political  matters.  In  the  discussion  after  the  presentation,  it  was 

suggested that perhaps politics has, in Russia become a severely compromised concept, hence the 

desire shared by many Russians to present themselves as apolitical. 

 

 

Cathy Ratcliff (right) and Lara Ryazanova-Clarke 

Yulia Lukyanova 



 

International Conference:  



“Russia as a Value Centre: Contemporary Russian Identity and Soft Power” 

 

The month’s events ended with an international conference organized jointly with the University’s 

newly  established  Centre  for  Cultural  Relations  and  Luke  March  from  Politics  and  International 

Relations at Edinburgh University: “Russia as a Value Centre: Contemporary Russian Identity and 

Soft Power”. The conference took place on the 23 May at the Princess Dashkova Centre.  

 

The  idea  of  “soft  power”,  coined  by  Joseph  Nye,  refers  to  the  ability  to  get  ‘others  to  want  the 



outcomes  you  want’.  Unlike  hard  power,  soft  power  does  not  involve  the  use  of  coercion  or 

payment. The aim of the conference was to examine how soft power has become an integral part 

of  Russia’s  efforts  to  boost  its  own  global  image,  attractiveness  and  influence.  The  conference 

sought to highlight different aspects of Russia as a value centre: looking at the particular cultural 

values  contemporary Russia  claims  as  its  own;  how  these  are propagated  through domestic  and 

foreign media and cultural realms; and how they are reflected in official doctrine and debates. 

 

The first conference panel, chaired 



by  Luke  March,  was  devoted  to 

political  values  and  norms,  soft 

power  and  foreign  policy.  The 

panel  opened  with  Hanna  Smith 

from  the  Aleksanteri  Institute, 

Helsinki,  who  compared  Russia’s 

“great  power”  identity,  generally 

regarded  as  one  of  the  guiding 

principles of Russian foreign policy, 

with  the  “soft  power”  which,  she 

argued,  has  been  an  important 

element  in  Russian  foreign  policy 

for  at  least  a  decade.  The  next 

presentation,  by  Derek  Averre, 

from 

CREES 


(University 

of 


Birmingham)  was  on  the  topic  of 

norms 


of 

intervention, 

with 

reference  to  the  tensions  arising  around  the  principles  of  Responsibility  to  Protect  (R2P) 



programme  due  to  conflicting  values.  It  was  argued  that  while  some  nations  see  humanitarian 

issues as central to R2P, Russia sees sovereignty and the re-establishment of the primacy of state 

order as more important objectives of international law.  The final speaker in the panel,  Natasha 

Kuhrt (King’s College, London) addressed the subject of the language of international law in Russia 

since  the  fall  of  the  USSR,  examining  possible  differences  in  perception  between  Russian  and 

international  audiences  that  could  affect  the  understanding  of  certain  key  terms,  such  as  self-

determination, statehood and secession. 

 

From the left: Derek Averre, Natasha Kuhrt, Hanna Smith  



and Luke March 


 

 



 

The  second  panel,  chaired  by  Derek  Averre, 

was on soft power strategies and institutions. 

The  first  speaker  was  Valentina  Feklyunina 

from  Newcastle.  Her  presentation  concerned 

the  imagined  community  of  ‘Russkii  mir’, 

which has been central to Putin’s narrative of 

Russia’s  distinctness  in  the  international 

arena, and looked at the evolution of Russia’s 

approach  to  public  diplomacy  over  the  past 

decade  and  at  the  concept  of  the  ‘Russian 

world’  within  its  overall strategy.  The  second 

speaker,  Victoria  Hudson  from  Aston,  spoke 

on soft power and state identity in Russia. She 

argued that Russia has undergone an identity 

crisis since the fall of the Soviet Union, a lack 

of consensus on geo-political values which has resulted in an often incoherent and contradictory 

foreign  policy.  Although  under  Putin’s  leadership  the  Russian  Federation  has  gained  a  more 

assured sense of its place in the world, the nation’s relationship with the rest of the world is still 

disputed, and this is reflected in the co-existence of various soft power strategies, each reflecting 

the agenda of different elite groups.  

 

The  third  panel,  chaired  by  Vera 



Zvereva,  took  as  its  subject  soft 

power  in  media  discourse.  The  first 

speaker 

was 


Ilya 

Yablokov 

(Manchester)  who  addressed  the 

subject of conspiracy narratives in the 

news agenda of the Russian television 

channel  Russia  Today  (RT).  The 

presentation  argued  that  RT  has 

deliberately 

exploited 

populist, 

alternative 

theories 

of 

power 


(conspiracy  theories)  in  order  to 

legitimize  Russian  domestic  and 

foreign  policies,  and  to  delegitimize 

the  position  of  the  U.S.  government. 

This component of RT broadcasting is 

a powerful political instrument in the 

post-Cold  War  de-ideologized  world,  and  has  proved  very  successful  in  attracting  audiences 

around  the  world  with  different  political  views.  The  second  speaker,  Stephen  Hutchings  from 

Manchester, offered a comparative analysis of coverage of the 2014 Winter Olympics in Sochi by 

RT and BBC World TV. His study described how news narratives were constructed by each channel 



Stephen Hutchings 

The audience of the conference 


 

through  the  interplay  of  broadcast  and  material  social  media,  and  assessed  the  extent  to  which 



those narratives were shaped by‘soft power’ goals. Some of the particular issues examined were 

security  and  openness;  LGBT  rights;  and  national  and  cosmopolitan  identities.  the  relationship 

between the Olympics and the looming Ukraine crisis was also addressed. The last speaker on the 

panel,  Lara  Ryazanova-Clarke  from  Edinburgh,  presented  an  account  of  Russian  state-sponsored 

efforts to use the Russian language media as an instrument of soft power. The paper explored the 

semantics of homogeneity called upon for the construction of the post-Soviet collective “linguistic 

imaginary”, using the illustration of data from ‘Mir’, a broadcasting corporation targeting the CIS. 

It  was  argued  that  Mir’s  programmes  employ  certain  linguistic  and  discursive  forms  in  order  to 

represent  the  post-Soviet  world  as  a  coherent  unity.  However,  the  delivery  of  the  semantics  of 

homogeneity was shown to be constantly disrupted, with narratives being conflicting and fluid and 

subject positions uncertain. 

 

The  final  panel,  chaired  by  Hanna 



Smith, was on the subject of new East-

West divides. It began with a paper by 

Luke  March  from  the  University  of 

Edinburgh  on  the  manifestation  of 

nationalism  in  Russian  and  US  foreign 

policy.  The  paper  attempted  to  put 

Russian 

nationalism 

into 



comparative  context,  given  that  much 



analysis,  particularly  in  the  US,  risks 

‘Orientalising’  Russia,  (as  James  D. 

White  notes  (2010)),  by  uncritically 

regarding  its  nationalistic  proclivities 

as  deviations  from  a  ‘normal’  path 

espoused  by  Western  states.  The 

paper  argued  that  American  political 

culture  includes  an  element  of 

‘populist  nationalism’,  which  sees  the  US  as  a  civilization  threatened  by ‘barbarians  at the  gate’. 

Thus, nationalism within the US and Russia may, in fact, resemble one another more closely than 

we think. The second speaker was Yulia Kiseleva from King’s College London, who spoke on civil 

society  and  Russian  soft  power.  Kiseleva  argued  that  Russia  has,  in  recent  years,  expressed  a 

strong interest in exercising soft power to shape its relations with the West but has not found it 

easy to do so. She argued that it was differences between Russian and Western understandings of 

the role of civil society that made it difficult for Russia to use soft power and attraction in order to 

influence  Western  policy  decisions.  Finally,  Gulnaz  Sharafutdinova  from  King’s  College,  London, 

examined the role of emotions in the processes unfolding in relation to the Ukraine, and the role 

of political leadership in enabling the expression, legitimization and promotion of these emotions. 

It was argued that that political leaders on all sides played a role in intensifying and legitimating 

certain emotional reactions - fear, anger, anxiety and ressentiment – which attended and affected 

political events and processes in post-Maidan Ukraine. Important for political analysts and policy 

makers to understand emotion as a driving force behind political processes.  



 

Gulnaz Sharafutdinova 


 

July Events 



Guitar Concert 

Musician Oleg Timofeev is expected to come to Edinburgh 

4

th

  of  July  to  present  music  composed  by  Princess 



Dashkova and her contemporaries.  

In this lecture-recital, he will present an illustrated history 

of  his  instrument  that  was  created  during  the  reign  of 

Catherine the Great and reached the peak of its popularity 

in  the  1820s-1840s. Oleg  Timofeev  will  play  the 

compositions  of  Ekaterina  Dashkova,  but  also  I.  von  Held, 

A. Svientitsky, A. Sychra, and others. 

The  tickets  will  be  available  on-line  at  the  Dashkova 

website soon. 

 

 



 

 

All of the staff at the Dashkova Centre would like to wish all our friends 



and associates an enjoyable summer break. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Follow us on Facebook for regular updates of news and events. 



https://www.facebook.com/DashkovaCentre

 

 



 

The Dashkova Centre is now on Twitter! You can follow us on @DashkovaCentre 



Oleg Timofeev 



Dostları ilə paylaş:


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©genderi.org 2017
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə