C Peter King, from Jean Buridan’s Logic



Yüklə 408,2 Kb.
Pdf görüntüsü
səhifə9/35
tarix25.07.2018
ölçüsü408,2 Kb.
#58735
1   ...   5   6   7   8   9   10   11   12   ...   35

18

INTRODUCTION TO JEAN BURIDAN’S LOGIC

the things for which the term supposit. The different categories are

taken (sumuntur) from these different modes of predication.

Buridan discusses such modes of adjacence in QM 5.8; he states the key

problem, Bradley’s regress, in fol. 31rb-va, and in fol. 31vb asserts that there

is a “mode of relation” he calls an ‘inseparable disposition,’ which is the

inherence of an accident in a subject. These dispositions are inseparable;

to destroy them is to destroy the inherence, and conversely; and “they are

accidents which are inseparably related to their subjects in this manner.”

28

These ‘dispositions’ are qualities of qualities which are inseparable, but they



are not a new kind of entity; they are unusual entities of an old kind, namely

qualities.

The semantic counterpart of these ontological issues is now clear.

a term like ‘white’ (i ) stands for (supposits for) an individual person; (ii )

connotes the quality whiteness; and (iii ) “appellates the quality insofar as it

is adjacent to what it stands for,” that is, appellates the special disposition

of inherence (TS 1.4.8), which itself is a quality (indeed a quality of a

quality), inseparable from the white thing itself without destroying the white

thing. Of course, “to signify the added disposition is not to signify that the

disposition is added” (QM 5.7 fol. 31ra). A term is therefore appellative if

it is apt to satisfy (i )–(iii ).

29

Obviously, we may treat the semantic relation



of ‘appellation’ as a kind of naming, denoting the inseparable disposition

which is the appropriate form of adjacence. For ‘wealthy’ we may treat the

mode of adjacence as various mental qualities of the people involved which

constitute the recognition of ownership, for example.

The Mental correlate of an appellative term is a primitive complex-

ive concept: roughly, it is the functor ‘thing-having-x’ which is applied to

the absolute concepts of abstract qualities, e. g. ‘thing-having-whiteness.’

The primitiveness of the functor means that there need be no nominal def-

inition of the term in question, though of course there may well be. The

functor must be complexive well, since Buridan allows accidents like white-

ness to exist without inhering in a particular subject,

30

and the inseparable



28

See Normore [1984] who discusses this text and the metaphysical problems in detail.

29

The qualification ‘apt to’ is necessary, because (i )–(iii ) may fail in actual practice:



the term may fail to refer; what is connoted may not exist; what is connoted may fail

to inhere, i. e. this disposition be destroyed (QM 4.9 fol. 19ra; TS 5.2.6). This last

case is theologically crucial, since it describes the Eucharist, in which the qualities of

the bread remain without inhering in a subject. In each of these cases the truth-value

of the sentence containing the term is affected.

30

The semantic version of this principle is that ‘ϕ-ness’ is not synonymous with ‘what



it is to be ϕ,’ which Buridan defends in QM 4.6 fol. 30vb.

c Peter King, from Jean Buridan’s Logic (Dordrecht: D. Reidel 1985) 3–82.




INTRODUCTION TO JEAN BURIDAN’S LOGIC

19

disposition must be involved.



The theory of definition was our initial guide to whether a term was

absolute or appellative. We can now see that the usefulness of the theory

of definition was in that definition provides a generally reliable guide to

whether a term in Mental is complex or not. But in certain cases the theory

of definition is not sufficient, and we had to investigate deeper metaphysical

issues. The net result is that appellative terms are those with structure

in Mental, not merely those which have definition; such structure can be

introduced by the primitive complexive functor described in the preceding

paragraph.

4.3 Intentional Verbs

One of the key uses of the doctrine of appellation is to analyze the

behavior of terms in sentential contexts with intentional verbs.

31

His re-


marks equally apply to the participles and nouns derived from them. Such

verbs (and the terms derived from them—henceforth I shall omit this clause)

differ from other verbs in that the “verbal action” each specifies “goes over”

to their object not directly, into the things for which the terms supposit,

but indirectly, by means of “certain mediating concepts indicated by those

terms” (TS 1.6.12-14, TC 3.7.3). In particular, such verbs cause the terms

with which they are construed to appellare suas rationes, that is, to ap-

pellate the concept or ratio by which the terms were imposed to signify

(TS 3.8.25, TS 5.3.1 Rules App-1 and App-2, TC 3.7.5).

For Buridan, we are only mediately in touch with the things the

concepts are about, by means of mediating concepts: perhaps a single con-

cept, perhaps a Mental sentence. Such concepts give the ratio significandi

to an inscription or an utterance; knowledge, in this sense, is not direct but

requires an instrument (QM 12.8 fol. 70vb). As Buridan says in TS 3.7.10,

the logical analysis of a sentence such as:

Socrates knows A

is given by:

Socrates knows A according to the ratio or concept by which the

term ‘A’ is applied, that is, according to the concept-of-A

Buridan is therefore a “descriptionalist”: there is no pure immediate know-

ing; all knowledge is mediated by some concept(s) specifying a description

31

By “intentional verbs” I mean verbs that are (i ) cognitive or epistemic, such as ‘know,’



‘understand,’ ‘believe,’ and the like; (ii ) verbs of desire, such as ‘want,’ ‘intend,’ ‘hope,’

and the like; (iii ) promissory-verbs, such as ‘owe’ or ‘promise’ and the like.

The

fullest list, though Buridan acknowledges its incompleteness, is found in TC 3.4.7;



their characteristics are discussed in Soph. 4 Sophisms 7–15, TS 3.8.24-31 and 5.3.1-8,

TC 1.6.12-16 and .73-10, QM 4.8 fol. 19ra and 4.14 fol. 23va, QSP 2.12 fol. 38va.

c Peter King, from Jean Buridan’s Logic (Dordrecht: D. Reidel 1985) 3–82.




Yüklə 408,2 Kb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:
1   ...   5   6   7   8   9   10   11   12   ...   35




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©genderi.org 2022
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə