Cermak(2). vp



Yüklə 346,3 Kb.

səhifə1/12
tarix25.07.2018
ölçüsü346,3 Kb.
  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   12


Summary

Diurnal and seasonal tree water storage was stud-

ied in three large Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii [Mirb.]

Franco) trees at the Wind River Canopy Crane Research site.

Changes in water storage were based on measurements of sap

flow and changes in stem volume and tissue water content at

different heights in the stem and branches. We measured sap

flow by two variants of the heat balance method (with internal

heating in stems and external heating in branches), stem vol-

ume with electronic dendrometers, and tissue water content

gravimetrically. Water storage was calculated from the differ-

ences in diurnal courses of sap flow at different heights and

their integration. Old-growth Douglas-fir trees contained large

amounts of free water: stem sapwood was the most important

storage site, followed by stem phloem, branch sapwood,

branch phloem and needles. There were significant time shifts

(minutes to hours) between sap flow measured at different po-

sitions within the transport system (i.e., stem base to shoot tip),

suggesting a highly elastic transport system. On selected fine

days between late July and early October, when daily transpira-

tion ranged from 150 to 300 liters, the quantity of stored water

used daily ranged from 25 to 55 liters, i.e., about 20% of daily

total sap flow. The greatest amount of this stored water came

from the lower stem; however, proportionally more water was

removed from the upper parts of the tree relative to their water

storage capacity. In addition to lags in sap flow from one point

in the hydrolic pathway to another, the withdrawal and replace-

ment of stored water was reflected in changes in stem volume.

When point-to-point lags in sap flow (minutes to hours near the

top and stem base, respectively) were considered, there was a

strong linear relationship between stem volume changes and

transpiration. Volume changes of the whole tree were small

(equivalent to 14% of the total daily use of stored water) indi-

cating that most stored water came from the stem and from its

inelastic (sapwood) tissues. Whole tree transpiration can be

maintained with stored water for about a week, but it can be

maintained with stored water from the upper crown alone for

no more than a few hours.



Keywords: dendrometer, flow rate differences, heat balance

method, time shift, tissue free water content, vertical profile.

Introduction

Most analyses of plant water relations regard the soil as the

sole source of transpired water. Roberts (1976) reported that

the amount of free water from storage in Pinus sylvestris L.

trees and stands is insignificant relative to daily or seasonal

transpiration. Similarly, Tyree and Yang (1990) concluded that

stored water is not a significant source of water for transpira-

tion in most woody plants. Holbrook (1995) in her review of

stem water storage stated: “Its [Stem water storage] role in

maintaining high levels of photosynthetic carbon gain during

periods of drought, however, is limited to plants with inher-

ently low transpiration rates (i.e., CAM succulents and per-

haps large conifers).” However, Ladefoged (1963), Hinckley

and Bruckerhoff (1975), Waring and Running (1978), Waring

et al. (1979) and Èermák et al. (1976, 1982) have suggested

that internal water storage in both elastic and inelastic tissues

may be important in supporting diurnal and seasonal

transpiration of woody plants. In special situations, it has been

observed that internal storage can provide a significant propor-

tion of the total diurnal and even seasonal water use by a plant

(e.g., Èermák et al. 1982, 1984, Goldstein et al. 1984, 1998,

Borchert 1994). If storage is minimal in large trees, then water

loss would either result in severe water deficits or prolonged

stomatal closure. Either of these outcomes would have conse-

quences for growth and survival. Therefore, we contend, as

suggested by older work with trees, that stored water plays a

biologically significant role.

Water transport in large old-growth trees occurs over long

distances via conducting elements that may have low hydrau-

lic conductivities (Gartner 1995, Sperry 1995, Ryan and Yoder

1996). Even in short-stemmed woody plants, there may be a

Tree Physiology 27, 181–198

© 2007 Heron Publishing—Victoria, Canada

Tree water storage and its diurnal dynamics related to sap flow and

changes in stem volume in old-growth Douglas-fir trees

JAN ÈERMÁK,

1,2,3

JIØÍ KUÈERA,



4

WILLIAM L. BAUERLE,

5

NATHAN PHILLIPS



6

and


THOMAS M. HINCKLEY

3

1



Institute of Forest Ecology, Mendel University of Agriculture and Forestry, 61300 Brno, Czech Republic

2

Corresponding author (cermak@mendelu.cz)

3

College of Forest Resources, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195, USA

4

Environmental Measuring Systems Inc., 61300 Brno, Czech Republic

5

Department of Horticulture, Clemson University, Clemson, SC 29634, USA

6

Department of Geography, Boston University, Boston, MA 02215, USA

Received September 5, 2005; accepted April 1, 2006; published online November 1, 2006

Downloaded from https://academic.oup.com/treephys/article-abstract/27/2/181/1664618

by guest

on 25 July 2018






Dostları ilə paylaş:
  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   12


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©genderi.org 2019
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə