Concerns in Europe January June 2001



Yüklə 2,46 Mb.

səhifə1/94
tarix19.07.2018
ölçüsü2,46 Mb.
  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   94


 

Amnesty International September 2001 

AI Index: EUR 01/003/2001

 

 



CONCERNS IN EUROPE 

January - June 2001 

 

 



 

FOREWORD 

 

This  bulletin  contains  information  about  Amnesty  International’s  main  concerns  in  Europe  between 



January and June 2001. Not every country in Europe is reported on: only those where there were significant 

developments in the period covered by the bulletin. 

 

The five Central Asian republics of Kazakstan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan and Uzbekistan 



are  included  in  the  Europe  Region  because  of  their  membership  of  the  Commonwealth  of  Independent 

States (CIS) and the Organisation for Security and Co-operation in Europe (OSCE). 

 

This  bulletin  contains  an  index  on  pages  100  and  101  about  cases  and  incidents  investigated  by 



Amnesty  International  affecting  women  and  children.  They  are  not  an  exhaustive  summary  of  the 

organization’s  concerns,  but  a  reflection  of  the  range  of  violations  suffered  by  women,  children  and 

juveniles in Europe. 

 

A  number  of  individual  country  reports  have  been  issued  on  the  concerns  featured  in  this  bulletin. 



References to these are made under the relevant country entry. In addition, more detailed information about 

particular  incidents  or  concerns  may  be  found  in  Urgent  Actions  and  News  Service  Items  issued  by 

Amnesty International. 

 

This bulletin is published by Amnesty International every six months. References to previous bulletins 



in the text are: 

 

AI Index: EUR 01/001/2001 



Concerns in Europe: July - December 2000 

AI Index: EUR 01/03/00 

Concerns in Europe: January - June 2000 

AI Index: EUR 01/01/00 

Concerns in Europe: July - December 1999 

AI Index: EUR 01/02/99 

Concerns in Europe: January - June 1999 

AI Index: EUR 01/02/98 

Concerns in Europe: January - June 1998 

AI Index: EUR 01/03/92 

Concerns in Europe: November 1991-April 1992   

AI Index: EUR 01/02/91 

Concerns in Europe: May-October 1991

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 



 

 

A L B A N I A



 

 

Allegations of torture and ill-treatment of 

detainees by police 

 

There were further allegations that police had tortured 



and  ill-treated  detainees.  On  the  night  of  20  to  21 

January Azgan Haklaj, a local leader of the opposition 

Democratic Party  in the northern district of Tropoja, 

was  arrested  at  home  and  subsequently  detained  for 

investigation  on  charges  of  “taking  part  in  illegal 

demonstrations” and “violence against property”. The 

charges, which he denied, related to a rally held in the 

town  of  Bajram  Curri  in  November  2000  which 

escalated into violent clashes between armed men and 

police.  During  these  the  police  station  was  attacked 

and one man (a civilian) was shot dead by police, and 

others wounded. On 22 January Azgan Haklaj filed a 

complaint  alleging  that  masked  police  officers  who 

had  arrested  him  had  beaten  him  with  rifle  butts, 

struck  his  wife  and  child,  and  had  continued  to  beat 

and kick him while driving him to Tirana. A forensic 

medical  report  confirmed  he  had  injuries  consistent 

with these  allegations. The  Ministry of Public Order 

denied that his wife or child had been ill-treated, and 

stated  that  police  officers  had  resorted  to  force  only 

because he had violently resisted arrest. In early April 

his  lawyer  stated  that  he  had  only  once  been 

questioned  in  connection  with  his  complaint,  and 

claimed that no other investigation work had yet been 

undertaken by police or prosecutors. 

In March a police officer in the town of Pogradec 

reportedly  punched  and  kicked  Lorenc  Çallo,  whom 

he wrongly suspected of having fired a gun. He also 

hit  him  with  a  radio  handset,  injuring  his  left  eye. 

Eyewitnesses  and  a  forensic  medical  examination 

confirmed  Lorenc  Çallo’s  allegations.  The  People’s 

Advocate  (Ombudsperson)  who  investigated  this 

incident recommended the dismissal of the officer. 

Çlirim Proko from the southern village of Lazarat 

was  arrested  on  16  March  in  connection  with  an 

incident  in  September  2000  when  a  government 

minister was prevented from entering the village by a 

group of armed men. He was also reportedly accused 

of wounding a police officer. Following his detention 

in Gjirokastra, several police officers reportedly took 

him from the police station and drove him into the hills 

outside  the  city  where  they  brutally  beat  him.  His 

bruises were reportedly visible to his lawyer and to a 

doctor who examined him nine days later. 

In  April  the  Secretary  General  of  Shoqata  Gay 

Albania  (Gay  Albania  Society),  Nasser  Almalak,  a 

Jordanian resident in Albania, and Amanta Bakalli, a 

transvestite,  were  attacked  by  four  members  of  the 

Republic Guards (a force responsible for the security 

of  government  officials  and  buildings)  outside  the 

Guards’  barracks,  where  they  had  gone  to  meet  a 

friend.  When  they  later  went  to  the  Guards’ 

headquarters  to  complain,  they  were  reportedly 

subjected  to  sexual  threats,  but  allowed  to  make  a 

formal complaint. Amanta Bakalli shortly afterwards 

left the country. 

In the run-up to national elections on 24 June the 

Democratic Party complained that on 17 June police 

had beaten and injured many of its supporters during 

a rally by the governing Socialist Party in the town of 

Kavaja.  The authorities stated that some Democratic 

Party supporters had attempted to disrupt the rally, and 

had  thrown  stones  at  police  officers  who  had  asked 

them to desist. Four police officers were said to have 

been lightly injured. 

 

 

Torture and ill-treatment of minors



 

 

 



In March 2001 an Albanian NGO, the Legal Clinic for 

Minors,  stated  that  almost  all  of  the  45  minors 

detained  in  custody  or  serving  sentences  which  the 

Clinic had interviewed during the previous six months 

had been subjected to physical violence - beatings - in 

police stations. 

 

 

Investigation of allegations 



of police ill-treatment

 

   



 

In  June  AI  was  informed  by  the  prosecuting 

authorities  that  judicial  investigations  into  (separate) 

complaints  of  ill-treatment  filed  by  Ferit  Çepi  and 

Naim Pulaku (see AI Index: EUR 01/001/2001 where 

Naim  Pulaku  is  incorrectly  named  as  Sami  Pulaku) 

had  been  completed  and  the  cases  sent  to  court  for 

trial.  In  a  third  case,  Elbasan  district  court  found  a 

police  officer,  Tahir  Çaushi,  guilty  of  “committing 

arbitrary acts” and sentenced him to a fine of 150,000 

leks  (about  US$1,000).  He  had  detained  and  beaten 

Gentian Bici in February 2000, causing him injuries.

 

 

AI visit and report



 

 

In  March  two  AI  delegates  visited  Albania  for 



research  purposes;  during  their  visit  they  met  and 

interviewed  victims  of  police  ill-treatment  and  their 

lawyers  as  well  as  Albanian  NGOs  working  in  the 

field of human rights and journalists. They also spoke 

with officials, including the Minister of Public Order, 

police and prosecutors. See Albania: Torture and ill-



treatment  -  an  end  to  impunity?  (AI  Index:  EUR 

11/001/2001), May 2001

 

 

A R M E N I A



 

 

Accession to the Council of Europe 



 

(update to AI Index: EUR 01/001/2001)

 

 

On  25  January  Armenia  and  Azerbaijan  formally 



acceded  to  the  Council  of  Europe,  following  an 

invitation  from  the  Committee  of  Ministers  on  9 

November 2000. On the day of joining, Armenia and 

Azerbaijan  signed  the  European  Convention  for  the 

Protection  of  Human  Rights  and  Fundamental 

Freedoms  (ECHR)  as  well  as  Protocol  Six  to  that 

convention,  which  provides  for  the  abolition  of  the 

                                                 

1

See PACE Opinion Numbers 121 and 122



 

death penalty for crimes committed in peacetime. The 

countries had committed to signing and ratifying those 

two conventions within one year of joining.

1

  Council 



of  Europe  Secretary-General  Walter  Schwimmer 

instituted  post-accession  monitoring  of  the  two  new 

members’  commitments  relating  to  respect  for 

democratic principles, rule of law and the observance 

of  human  rights.  In  particular,  in  February  the 





Dostları ilə paylaş:
  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   94


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©genderi.org 2019
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə