Cop12 Agenda Document Item 4 7 Action Plan for Far Eastern Curlew



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5. Framework for Action

5.1 Goal

To restore the Far Eastern Curlew’s population to a positive growth rate for a period of at least three generations.

5.2 Objectives, Actions and Results

The objectives and corresponding actions and results are set out in the tables below for all threats identified for the Far Eastern Curlew in the EAAF. Tables have been listed according to ratings assigned in the risk matrix.

Actions are prioritized as:

- Essential

- High


- Medium

- Low
Timescales are attached to each Action using the following scale:


- Immediate: completed within the next year

- Short: completed within the next 3 years

- Medium: completed within the next 5 years

- Long: completed within the next 10 years

- Ongoing: currently being implemented and should continue


Objective 1: Protect all important habitats for Far Eastern Curlew across its range.

Result

Action

Priority

Time Scale

Organizations responsible

1.1 All important staging and non-breeding sites along the EAAF are adequately protected and, where possible, managed .

1.1.1 Important non-breeding areas are identified

Applicable to: All Range States that support staging and non-breeding habitat



Essential

Short

Government institutions in charge of nature conservation

International and National conservation NGOs

Academic institutions


1.1.2 Important non-breeding areas are adequately managed

Applicable to: All Range States that support staging and non-breeding habitat



Essential

Medium

Government institutions in charge of nature conservation

International and National conservation NGOs



1.1.3 Important non-breeding areas are adequately protected

Applicable to: All Range States that support staging and non-breeding habitat



Essential

Medium

Government institutions in charge of nature conservation

International and National conservation NGOs



1.2 Breeding habitats are adequately protected and, where possible, managed.

1.2.1 Important breeding areas are identified

Applicable to: Russia and China



Essential

Short

Government institutions in charge of nature conservation

International and National conservation NGOs

Academic institutions


1.2.2 Important breeding areas are adequately managed

Applicable to: Russia and China



Essential

Medium

Government institutions in charge of nature conservation

International and National conservation NGOs



1.2.3 Important breeding areas are adequately protected

Applicable to: Russia and China



Essential

Medium

Government institutions in charge of nature conservation

International and National conservation NGOs



Objective 2: Establish a climate change response plan for Far Eastern Curlew

2.1 The impacts of climate change on Far Eastern Curlew are buffered.

2.1.1 Quantify and predict changes to important breeding habitat

Applicable to: All Range States that support breeding habitat



Medium

Medium

Government institutions in charge of nature conservation

International and National conservation NGOs

Academic institutions


2.1.2 Quantify and predict changes to important staging and non-breeding sites

Applicable to: All Range States that support staging and non-breeding habitat



Medium

Medium

Government institutions in charge of nature conservation

International and National conservation NGOs

Academic institutions


2.1.3 Validate predictions of population response to climate change against measured data

Applicable to: All Range States



Medium

Long

Government institutions in charge of nature conservation

International and National conservation NGOs

Academic institutions


2.1.4 Identify potential shifts in nesting and non-breeding distribution and ensure adequate coverage of these areas in protected areas

Applicable to: All Range States that support breeding and non-breeding habitat



Medium

Long

Government institutions in charge of nature conservation

International and National conservation NGOs

Academic institutions


Objective 3: Ensure the legal direct take of Far Eastern Curlew is eliminated

3.1 Far Eastern Curlew populations subject to legal direct take are protected

3.1.1 Immediately cease all forms of legal direct take of Far Eastern Curlew

Applicable to: All Range States where legal hunting occurs.



Essential

Short

Government institutions in charge of nature conservation

International and National conservation NGOs



Objective 4: Reduce, or eliminate, illegal take of Far Eastern Curlew

4.1 The areas where the illegal take of Far Eastern Curlews occurs are identified

4.1.1 Identify key areas where Far Eastern Curlew illegal take occurs

Applicable to: All Range States



Essential

Short

Government institutions in charge of nature conservation

International and National conservation NGOs



4.1.2 Strengthen legal mechanisms in areas affected by harvesting, trading and illegal use

Applicable to: All Range States



Essential

Medium

Government institutions in charge of nature conservation.

4.2 Reduced illegal take of Far Eastern Curlew

4.2.1 Promote the enforcement of legal mechanisms to reduce illegal take

Applicable to: All Range States



Essential

Short

Government institutions in charge of nature conservation

International and National conservation NGOs



4.2.2 Implement an educational awareness programme, which may include incentives for best practice, aimed at reducing the illegal and incidental take of Far Eastern Curlew in the EAAF

Applicable to: All Range States



Medium

Immediate

Government institutions in charge of nature conservation

International and National conservation NGOs



Objective 5: Support activities to reduce the risk and impact of chronic and acute pollution on Far Eastern Curlew in coastal foraging areas

5.1 Reduced chronic pollution in sites of international importance

5.1.1 Work with policy and regulatory authorities to reduce levels of pollution

Applicable to: All Range States



Medium

Medium

Government institutions in charge of nature conservation and pollution control

International and National conservation NGOs

Academic institutions


5.2 Monitoring programmes are in place to measure the impact of chronic pollution within coastal waters on the health of Far Eastern Curlew

5.2.1 Monitor water quality and Far Eastern Curlew health in key coastal staging and non-breeding sites

Applicable to: All Range States that support staging and non-breeding habitat



Low

Medium

Government institutions in charge of nature conservation

International and National conservation NGOs

Academic institutions


Objective 6: To monitor the population dynamics of Far Eastern Curlew in the EAAF to detect population responses to management implemented under this Single Species Action Plan

6.1 Demographic data are available to allow assessment of the response of Far Eastern Curlew to anthropogenic impacts throughout the EAAF

6.1.1 Establish, or maintain long-term monitoring system of key demographic parameters following best practice guidelines

Applicable to: All Range States



High

Medium

Government institutions in charge of nature conservation

International and National conservation NGOs

Academic institutions


6.1.2 Monitor numbers of birds at a statistically robust sample of staging and non-breeding sites and undertake analysis of data to improve the accuracy of the global population estimate

Applicable to: All Range States that support staging and non-breeding habitat



Essential

Immediate

Government institutions in charge of nature conservation

International and National conservation NGOs

Academic institutions


6.1.3 Monitor numbers at a statistically robust sample of breeding areas in Russia and China

Applicable to: Russia and China



Essential

Immediate

Government institutions in charge of nature conservation

International and National conservation NGOs

Academic institutions


6.1.4 Initiate research to accurately determine:

Population structure

Population trends

Adult and juvenile survival

Productivity

Nest survival and causes of nest loss

Chick survival

Breeding density

Foraging ecology and diet

Applicable to: All Range States



Medium

Ongoing

Government institutions in charge of nature conservation

International and National conservation NGOs

Academic institutions


6.1.5 Identify through satellite tracking the migratory routes and non-breeding distributions of birds from different breeding populations, particularly while on southward migration.

Applicable to: All Range States



Medium

Immediate

International and National conservation NGOs

Academic institutions



6.1.6 Maintain an internationally coordinated colour-marking scheme through the EAAFP Colour-marking Task Force and relevant national bird banding programmes

Applicable to: All Range States



Medium

On-going

Government institutions in charge of nature conservation

International and National conservation NGOs

East Asian – Australasian Flyway Partnership


Objective 7: Assess the risk and impact of disturbance on Far Eastern Curlew

7.1 The effect of disturbance on Far Eastern Curlew has been quantified

7.1.1 Quantify the impact of disturbance on the breeding grounds and assess the likely impact on the population

Applicable to: Russia and China



High

Medium

Government institutions in charge of nature conservation

International and National conservation NGOs

Academic institutions


7.1.2 Quantify the level of disturbance in key staging and non-breeding sites and assess the likely impact on the population

Applicable to: All Range States that support staging and non-breeding habitat



High

Medium

Government institutions in charge of nature conservation

International and National conservation NGOs

Academic institutions


Objective 8: All Range States are actively implementing the Single Species Action Plan

8.1 International cooperation is maximized through the full engagement of all Range States in relevant multilateral frameworks

8.1.1 Consider developing national action plans to assist in the implementation of this Single Species Action Plan

Applicable to: All Range States



High

Immediate

Government institutions in charge of nature conservation

International and National conservation NGOs



8.1.2 Consider accession to all relevant multilateral frameworks by Range States

Applicable to: All Range States



High

Long

Government institutions in charge of nature conservation

International and National conservation NGOs



8.1.3 Maintain the active work of the EAAFP Far Eastern Curlew Task Force to coordinate implementation of the Single Species Action Plan

Applicable to: All Range States



Essential

Long

Government institutions in charge of nature conservation

International and National conservation NGOs



8.1.4 Hold regular meetings to exchange information and plan joint actions for the conservation of the Far Eastern Curlew

Applicable to: All Range States



Essential

On-going

Government institutions in charge of nature conservation

International and National conservation NGOs

Academic Institutions


Objective 9: Raise public awareness of the Far Eastern Curlew and disseminate information material

9.1 Use modern technologies and social media to raise public awareness

9.1.1 Prepare a brochure in Range States’ languages and disseminate widely

Applicable to: All Range States



High

Short

International and National conservation NGOs

9.2 Target local authorities and decision-makers on the needs of Far Eastern Curlew

9.2.1 Develop materials to raise awareness amongst local authorities responsible for approving developments at important sites identified in Action 1.1 and 1.2

High

Short

International and National conservation NGOs

6. References

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Antonov, A.I. (2010). Nesting ecology of the Eastern Curlew, Numenius madagascariensis (Linnaeus, 1766) in the South of the species range. Russian Journal of Ecology 41: 345-346.

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Chan, S., Fang W.H., Lee, K.S., Yamada, Y. & Yu, Y.T. (2010). International Single Species Action Plan for the Conservation of the Black-faced Spoonbill (Platalea minor) BirdLife International Asia Division, Tokyo, Japan; CMS Secretariat, Bonn Germany. 74 pages. Technical Report Series 22.

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