Dec. 2005, p. 8201-8204 Vol. 187, No



Yüklə 150,28 Kb.
Pdf görüntüsü
tarix29.07.2018
ölçüsü150,28 Kb.
#59504


J

OURNAL OF

B

ACTERIOLOGY



, Dec. 2005, p. 8201–8204

Vol. 187, No. 23

0021-9193/05/$08.00

ϩ0 doi:10.1128/JB.187.23.8201–8204.2005

Copyright © 2005, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

A Second Case of

Ϫ1 Ribosomal Frameshifting Affecting a Major

Virion Protein of the Lactobacillus Bacteriophage A2

Isabel Rodrı´guez, Pilar Garcı´a, and Juan E. Sua

´rez*


Area de Microbiologı´a, Instituto Universitario de Biotecnologı´a (IUBA), Universidad de Oviedo and

Instituto de Productos La

´cteos de Asturias (CSIC), Villaviciosa, Spain

Received 23 June 2005/Accepted 12 September 2005



The bacteriophage A2 major tail protein gene utilizes a

؊1 translational frameshift to generate two



structural polypeptides. Frameshifting is promoted by a slippery sequence and an RNA pseudoknot located 3

؅

of the gene. The major head gene presents a similar recoding ability. A2 is the only phage described with two

؊1 frameshifts.

Programmed

Ϫ1 frameshifting is generated through a back-

ward displacement of the translating ribosome to the position

Ϫ1, which results in the synthesis of two polypeptides, one that

arises from translation of the gene in the 0 frame and another

that is identical to it until the frameshifting position but whose

sequence corresponds to the message encoded in the

Ϫ1 frame

from that point onwards (1). Two cis-acting elements are com-

monly necessary for

Ϫ1 frameshifting. The first is a hep-

tanucleotide sequence that allows tandem slippage of the

tRNAs located at the functional A and P sites of the ribosome

and repairing of their respective anticodon triplets with the

codons that result in the

Ϫ1 frame. The second is a structure

that promotes ribosome pausing at the slippery sequence, such

as a stem loop or a pseudoknot that starts in its 3

Ј vicinity (3,

5, 11) or a Shine-Dalgarno-like sequence located about 10

nucleotides 5

Ј of the slippery sequence (10, 15). The functional

meaning of

Ϫ1 frameshifting may be to produce two proteins

in a defined ratio. In the case of viral genes the “frameshifted”

product is usually essential for viability, both in retroviruses,

where synthesis of a fixed proportion of gpGag-Pol is required

for efficient packaging of reverse transcriptase (21), and in

bacteriophages, for example, in lambda the fusion protein

gpG-T is essential for tail assembly, even though it does not

become part of the mature virion (12). However, in the case of

cellular genes the frameshifted products may be dispensable,

(15) although, as in the gamma subunit of DNA polymerase III

of Escherichia coli (2), it may be important for the activity of

the enzyme (19).

A2 is a temperate bacteriophage that belongs to the family

Siphoviridae (8). The two major proteins of the capsid share

their amino termini, which matched an internal sequence of



orf5 in the phage genome (6). This suggested that orf5 gives

rise to two polypeptides of different sizes, the smaller (gp5A)

resulting from canonical translation of orf5 and the larger

(gp5B) being generated by a

Ϫ1 ribosomal frameshift at the

penultimate codon of orf5 mRNA, resulting in a product that

is 85 amino acids longer than gp5A. Frameshifting is depen-

dent on a slippery region with the sequence CCCAAAA and

on a stem loop that begins 9 nucleotides after the end of the

slippery sequence. Both gp5A and gp5B appear to be essential

for phage viability, because although lysogens harboring

prophages that produce only one or the other protein become

lysed upon induction with mitomycin C, no viable phage prog-

eny are observed (7).

In this work, data are presented which indicate that

Ϫ1

frameshifting during the phage A2 lytic cycle is not restricted



to the mRNA for the major head proteins but also happens in

the transcript for the major tail proteins. In addition, some

requirements for this recoding event are studied.

Bacteriophage A2 was propagated and assayed on Lactoba-



cillus casei ATCC 393 as previously described (7). Escherichia

coli BL21(DE3)/pLysS was used in expression studies of the

different versions of orf10 cloned into plasmid pET11a (22).

Plasmid constructions, site-directed mutagenesis, and protein

labeling and detection were performed as described previously

(7).

Purification of gp10A and gp10B was achieved after overex-



pression of orf10 cloned into pET11a. Cell extracts were ultra-

centrifuged (100,000

ϫ for 90 min) and successively loaded

onto Q-Sepharose, Mono Q, and Superdex 75 columns (Phar-

macia). The purified proteins were digested with porcine tryp-

sin (Promega), and the resulting peptides were analyzed by

matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization–time of flight mass

spectrometry, essentially as previously described (7).

To achieve overproduction of gp10A and gp10B in L. casei,

orf10 with its 3

Ј-adjacent region was placed under the nisin

promoter (P

nis

) using plasmids pEM117 and pEM110 and the

procedure described previously was followed (14). The result-

ing plasmid, pEM110-orf10, was electroporated into an L. casei

derivative that expressed the quorum-sensing system that pro-

motes P


nis

induction (9). Overexpression was obtained by ad-

dition of nisin to exponential cultures of this L. casei strain.

gp10-specific antibodies were obtained from rabbits, injected

at 2-week intervals with 1 mg of pure gp10A emulsified 1:1 in

incomplete Freund’s adjuvant. For Western blotting of L. casei

extracts, proteins were separated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-

polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and electrotransferred to

an Immobilon-P membrane (Millipore). The membrane was

incubated with anti-gp10 rabbit immunoglobulin G (IgG) (1:

* Corresponding author. Mailing address: Area de Microbiologı´a,

Facultad de Medicina, Universidad de Oviedo, Julia

´n Claverı´a 6,

33006 Oviedo, Spain. Phone: 34-985103559. Fax: 34-985103148. E-mail:

evaristo@uniovi.es.

8201


 on July 28, 2018 by guest

http://jb.asm.org/

Downloaded from 



1,000) and then with peroxidase-conjugated goat anti-rabbit

IgG (1:5,000) (Jackson ImmunoResearch Laboratories). The

Western blots were developed using the BM chemilumines-

cence blotting substrate (POD) (Roche Diagnostics).



The major tail protein gene of phage A2 gives rise to two

polypeptides through

؊1 frameshifting. In silico analysis of the

A2 genome revealed a heptanucleotide (CCCAAAA) at the

end of the major tail protein gene (orf10) which was identical

to the slippery sequence previously encountered in orf5 (7).

This heptanucleotide was immediately followed by a putative

H-type pseudoknot (

⌬G ϭ Ϫ31.9 kcal/mol), thus suggesting

that a

Ϫ1 frameshift might occur at the end of the orf10



transcript. This would give rise, in addition to the canonical 202

residues polypeptide, to a second one of 283 amino acids (Fig.

1a and b).

To determine whether these structures were functional, a

DNA segment that comprises orf10 plus its 400-bp downstream

stretch was cloned into pET11a and overexpressed. Two

polypeptides of sizes compatible with that of the expected gp10

and with the product that would result from a

Ϫ1 frameshift in

the predicted position were observed (Fig. 2a, lane 1). Mass

spectrometry of the tryptic peptides of these two polypeptides

revealed that all those present in the smaller one (gp10A) were

also present in the bigger one (gp10B), including one that

would end at the lysine encoded by the second codon of the

slippery sequence. In addition, gp10B generated two peptides

of 2,279 and 1,792 Da, matching the expected masses of two

tryptic peptides that would result from translation of the mes-

sage downstream of orf10 when read in the

Ϫ1 frame (Fig. 1a).

To confirm the role of the slippery sequence, point muta-

tions were introduced in different positions of the heptanucle-

otide and their effect on frameshifting was tested. Any muta-

tions that induced a change in the dipeptide Pro-Lys encoded

by the slippery sequence in both the 0 and

Ϫ1 frames abolished

gp10B (Fig. 2a, lanes 2 to 7), suggesting the need for compat-

ibility of the anticodons of the tRNAs located at the A and P

ribosomal sites with their complementary codons in both

frames.

To test the functionality of the putative pseudoknot, a 48-bp



deletion was generated that comprised most of its stem 1 and

the intermediate loop (nomenclature used is as described in

reference 16) while preserving the slippery sequence and the

reading frame after the deleted DNA stretch (Fig. 1a). The

clone harboring the mutant gene would be expected to gener-

ate gp10A (21.8 kDa) and a shorter form of gp10B (28.0 kDa

instead of 29.6 kDa of the wild-type form), if the pseudoknot

did not play a role in frameshift occurrence. However, only

gp10A was visualized in the gels (Fig. 2b, lane 2), thus con-

firming the role of this secondary structure in frameshift oc-

currence.

To test whether frameshifting occurred in L. casei as well as

in E. coliorf10 with its adjacent 3

Ј sequence was cloned in a

plasmid under the control of the nisin promoter. After induc-

tion of the system, two polypeptides were observed that re-

acted with gp10-specific antibodies and had masses compatible

with the expected sizes of gp10A and gp10B (Fig. 2c, lane 2),

indicating that the

Ϫ1 frameshift signals were being recognized

in L. casei.

Both gp10A and gp10B are late proteins that become incor-

porated into mature A2 virions.

To determine the production

kinetics of both proteins, L. casei lysogenic exponential cul-

tures were induced with mitomycin C, and samples collected

during the lytic development of the phage were analyzed for

their protein content by Western blotting (Fig. 2d). Expression

of orf10 became evident at 90 min postinduction, but initially

only gp10A was observed. Detection of gp10B was delayed

until 240 min postinduction (under those conditions the cul-

tures start to lyse at about 300 min postinduction). This might

reflect a very different rate of biosynthesis for these proteins,

the canonical form being very favored over the frameshifted

product, which would reach a concentration detectable by the

antibodies only after a long period of accumulation. Both

FIG. 1. a) DNA and deduced protein sequences of the A2 genome region surrounding the 3

Ј end of the major tail protein gene (orf10); in the

DNA, the slippery sequence is indicated in boldface and italics, and the first stem-loop is indicated with converging arrows. The 48-bp segment

deleted from it is boxed. Relevant polypeptides obtained by tryptic digestion of gp10A and/or gp10B are underlined. b) Proposed secondary

structure of the mRNA frameshift stimulatory element located downstream of the slippery sequence.

8202


NOTES

J. B


ACTERIOL

.

 on July 28, 2018 by guest



http://jb.asm.org/

Downloaded from 




gp10A and gp10B were present in the virions (Fig. 2d, lane

A2), indicating that they contribute to the final structure of the

mature particle.

Ribosomal

Ϫ1 frameshifting appears to be quite common

among genes involved in virion morphogenesis of tailed bac-

teriophages. It was first described for the gene that encodes the

major head proteins of T3 and T7 (4) and later for generation

of the G-T fusion proteins of lambda (12) and many other

siphoviruses and myoviruses infecting both Eubacteria and Ar-

chaea (23). What makes A2 peculiar is that

Ϫ1 frameshifting

occurs upon translation of both the major head and tail genes

and that the four resulting polypeptides are part of the virion

particle. In addition, A2 does not have a system similar to the

one that promotes formation of the G-T fusion protein in

other phages: the orf located in a position similar to that of the

lambda gene is immediately followed by several stop codons

in all three possible frames, thus precluding formation of any

fusion product.

No amino acid sequence similarities were found between the

canonical products of the genes that encode the major head

and tail proteins of A2, i.e., gp5A and gp10A; however, their

frameshifted counterparts, gp5B and gp10B, showed extensive

homology in their extra carboxy-terminal ends. These stretches, of

85 and 81 amino acids, respectively, are 42% identical (63%

similar) (Fig. 3). The predicted structures of these two protein

segments are related to bacterial immunoglobulin-like folding

domains defined by pfam02368 (Big 2) and COG5492 (13).

Similar domains are found in tail components of phages such

as N15 and K (18, 20), bacterial surface proteins involved in

FIG. 2. a) Effect on frameshifting of different point mutations (underlined) at the slippery sequence of orf10 (in boldface). b) Outcome of the

deletion of the central part of the stem loop located downstream of the slippery sequence (lane 2); lane 1, control gene. orf10 (and its variants)

were placed under the control of the P10 promoter of T7 and overexpressed in vivo in E. coli in the presence of a

35

S-labeled amino acid mix and



rifampin. c) Expression of orf10, cloned in pEM110 under the control of the nisin promoter, in L. casei (lane 2); lane 1, untransformed culture.

d) Time course of accumulation of gp10A and gp10B in exponential cultures of an A2 lysogenic culture of L. casei induced with mitomycin C (0.5

␮g/ml); the figures above the lanes indicate time postinduction in minutes, L. casei stands for an uninduced culture, and A2 corresponds to purified

virions (the two bands below gp10A in this last lane are degradation products of this protein). The proteins were separated by sodium dodecyl

sulfate–12% polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and autoradiographed (E. coli) or detected by Western blotting (L. casei).

FIG. 3. Alignment of the amino acid sequences encoded by the

stretches located in the 3

Ј vicinity of the major head (MHP) and tail

(MTP) A2 genes after

Ϫ1 frameshifting with the COG5492 and

PFAM02368 (bacterial and phage surface proteins containing immu-

noglobulin-like domains) consensus motifs. The sequences of the por-

tions of three individual proteins with different functions (a

␤-1-3-


endoglucanase from Bacillus circulans, an adhesion factor from

Clostridium acetobutylicum, and the major tail protein of phage K; see

the text for references) that contain these motifs are also included for

comparison.

V

OL



. 187, 2005

NOTES


8203

 on July 28, 2018 by guest

http://jb.asm.org/

Downloaded from 




adherence (17), and enzymes that recognize polysaccharides as

substrates, such as an agarase from Microscilla spp. or a

␤-1-

3-endoglucanase from Bacillus circulans (24, 25) (Fig. 3). The



occurrence of Ig-like domains in structural phage proteins and

in bacterial products mainly involved in carbohydrate recogni-

tion might indicate that the phage proteins function in the

stabilization of the phage particle on the polysaccharide-based

cell envelope once the specific binding by the tail tip has oc-

curred (A. Davidson, personal communication). The phage A2

has an extraordinarily long tail of about 280 nm, which would

justify the need of these “molecular hooks” at the level of both

the head and tail of the infecting virion to retain its infectivity,

thus explaining why gp5B is essential for phage propagation

(7).

This work was supported by CICYT grants BMC2002-0638 and



SAF2004-0033 from the Ministry of Science and Technology (Spain)

and the FEDER Plan. P.G. and I.R. are holders, respectively, of a

fellowship and a scholarship associated with these grants.

We thank K. F. Chater for critical reading of the manuscript. The

proteomics service of the National Biotechnology Centre (CSIC) is

acknowledged.



REFERENCES

1. Baranov, P. V., R. F. Gesteland, and J. F. Atkins. 2002. Recoding: transla-

tional bifurcations in gene expression. Gene 286:187–201.

2. Blinkova, A., C. Hervas, P. T. Stukenberg, R. Onrust, M. E. O’Donnell, and



J. R. Walker.

1993. The Escherichia coli DNA polymerase III holoenzyme

contains both products of the dnaX gene, tau and gamma, but only tau is

essential. J. Bacteriol. 175:6018–6027.

3. Brierley, I. 1995. Ribosomal frameshifting viral RNAs. J. Gen. Virol. 76:

1885–1892.

4. Condron, B. G., J. F. Atkins, and R. F. Gesteland. 1991. Frameshifting in

gene 10 of bacteriophage T7. J. Bacteriol. 173:6998–7003.

5. Condron, B. G., R. F. Gesteland, and J. F. Atkins. 1991. An analysis of

sequences stimulating frameshifting in the decoding of gene 10 of bacterio-

phage T7. Nucleic Acids Res. 19:5607–5612.

6. Garcia, P., V. Ladero, and J. E. Suarez. 2003. Analysis of the morphogenetic

cluster and genome of the temperate Lactobacillus casei bacteriophage A2.

Arch. Virol. 148:1051–1070.

7. Garcia, P., I. Rodriguez, and J. E. Suarez. 2004. A

Ϫ1 ribosomal frameshift

in the transcript that encodes the major head protein of bacteriophage A2

mediates biosynthesis of a second essential component of the capsid. J.

Bacteriol. 186:1714–1719.

8. Herrero, M., C. G. de los Reyes-Gavila



´n, J. L. Caso, and J. E. Sua

´rez.

1994.


Characterization of

␾393-A2, a bacteriophage that infects Lactobacillus ca-



sei. Microbiology 140:2585–2590.

9. Kuipers, O. P., P. G. G. A. De Ruyter, M. Kleerebezem, and W. M. De Vos.

1998. Quorum sensing-controlled gene expression in lactic acid bacteria.

J. Biotechnol. 64:15–21.

10. Larsen, B., N. M. Wills, R. F. Gesteland, and J. F. Atkins. 1994. rRNA-

mRNA base pairing stimulates a programmed

Ϫ1 ribosomal frameshift. J.

Bacteriol. 176:6842–6851.

11. Larsen, B., R. F. Gesteland, and J. F. Atkins. 1997. Structural probing and

mutagenic analysis of the stem-loop required for Escherichia coli dnaX ri-

bosomal frameshifting: programmed efficiency of 50%. J. Mol. Biol. 271:47–

60.


12. Levin, M. E., R. W. Hendrix, and S. R. Casjens. 1993. A programmed

translational frameshift is required for the synthesis of a bacteriophage

lambda tail assembly protein. J. Mol. Biol. 234:124–139.

13. Marchler-Bauer, A., and S. H. Bryant. 2004. CD-Search: protein domain

annotations on the fly. Nucleic Acids Res. 32:W327–W331. [Online.]

14. Martin, M. C., M. Fernandez, J. M. Martin-Alonso, F. Parra, J. A. Boga, and



M. A. Alvarez.

2004. Nisin-controlled expression of Norwalk virus VP60

protein in Lactobacillus casei. FEMS Microbiol. Lett. 237:385–391.

15. Mejlhede, N., J. F. Atkins, and J. Neuhard. 1999. Ribosomal

Ϫ1 frameshift-

ing during decoding of Bacillus subtilis cdd occurs at the sequence CGA

AAG. J. Bacteriol. 181:2930–2937.

16. Moon, S., Y. Byun, H. J. Kim, S. Jeong, and K. Han. 2004. Predicting genes

expressed via

Ϫ1 and ϩ1 frameshifts. Nucleic Acids Res. 32:4884–4892.

17. Nolling, J., G. Breton, M. V. Omelchenko, K. S. Markarova, Q. Zeng, R.

Gibson, H. M. Lee, J. Dubois, D. Qiu, J. Hitti, Y. I. Wolf, R. L. Tatusov, F.

Sabathe, L. Doucette-Stamm, P. Soucaille, M. J. Daly, G. N. Bennett, E. V.

Koonin, and D. R. Smith.

2001. Genome sequence and comparative analysis

of the solvent-producing bacterium Clostridium acetobutylicum. J. Bacteriol.

183:

4823–4838.

18. O’Flaherty, S., A. Coffey, R. Edwards, W. Meaney, G. F. Fitzgerald, and R. P.

Ross.

2004. Genome of staphylococcal phage K: a new lineage of Myoviridae

infecting gram-positive bacteria with a low G

ϩC content. J. Bacteriol. 186:

2862–2871.

19. Pritchard, A. E., H. G. Dallmann, B. P. Glover, and C. S. McHenry. 2000. A

novel assembly mechanism for the DNA polymerase III holoenzyme DnaX

complex: association of deltadelta

Ј with DnaX(4) forms DnaX(3)deltadeltaЈ.

EMBO J. 19:6536–6545.

20. Ravin, V., N. Ravin, S. Casjens, M. E. Ford, G. F. Hatfull, and R. W.

Hendrix.

2000. Genomic sequence and analysis of the atypical temperate

bacteriophage N15. J. Mol. Biol. 299:53–73.

21. Ribas, J. C., and R. B. Wickner. 1998. The Gag domain of the Gag-Pol fusion

protein directs incorporation into the L-A double-stranded RNA viral par-

ticles in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. J. Biol. Chem. 273:9306–9311.

22. Studier, F. W., A. H. Rosenberg, J. J. Dunn, and J. W. Dubendorff. 1990. Use

of T7 RNA polymerase to direct expression of cloned genes. Methods En-

zymol. 185:60–89.

23. Xu, J., R. W. Hendrix, and R. L. Duda. 2004. Conserved translational frame-

shift in dsDNA bacteriophage tail assembly genes. Mol. Cell 16:11–21.

24. Yamamoto, M., R. Aono, and K. Horikoshi. 1993. Structure of the 87-kDa

beta-1,3-glucanase gene of Bacillus circulans IAM1165 and properties of the

enzyme accumulated in the periplasm of Escherichia coli carrying the gene.

Biosci. Biotechnol. Biochem. 57:1518–1525.

25. Zhong, Z., A. Toukdarian, D. Helinski, V. Knauf, S. Sykes, J. E. Wilkinson,



C. O’Bryne, T. Shea, C. DeLoughery, and R. Caspi.

2001. Sequence analysis

of a 101-kilobase plasmid required for agar degradation by a Microscilla

isolate. Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 67:5771–5779.

8204

NOTES


J. B

ACTERIOL


.

 on July 28, 2018 by guest

http://jb.asm.org/

Downloaded from 




Yüklə 150,28 Kb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©genderi.org 2023
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə