Discovery of Complex Behaviors through Contact-Invariant Optimization



Yüklə 229,36 Kb.

səhifə6/6
tarix17.11.2018
ölçüsü229,36 Kb.
1   2   3   4   5   6

body with sufficient density. Another simplification we make is to

penalize any relative velocity at contacting end effectors (see (2)),

which results in trajectories that do not have any noticeable slip-

ping. Instead, in a low friction environment character moves overly

conservatively, making sure contact forces do not travel outside the

friction cone and is unable to exploit possible slipping when plan-

ning motions.

The style of the motions was not the focus of this work, and could

use a lot of improvement, particularly for low-energy motions such

as walking where humans use every bit of physiology (which we

do not model) to their advantage. Since our method performs long-

horizon trajectory optimization, we should be able to incorporate

biomechanically-inspired cost terms from [Wang et al. 2009] to

shape the stylistic aspects of the motion.

In all our examples, standard methods for local gradient-based opti-

mization were able to find good solutions efficiently. This is one of

the key advantages of our framework. Still, the use of global opti-

mization could provide more robust exploration of the space of mo-

tions, especially for tasks such as getting up that have a wide range

of possible and equally good solutions. In such cases we would

prefer to produce multiple solutions, and select the ideal one.

In the examples presented here the number and duration of phases

was fixed. Generally, we have found no problems in overestimat-

ing the number of movement phases required to complete an ac-

tion. The character typically uses up extraneous movement phases

by keeping still or sitting down before or after completing the task.

Underestimating the number of phases is more problematic and can

result in very energy inefficient or completely unphysical leaps in

the motion. However, a fixed number of phases would not be as

much of an issue if the task costs were reformulated as running

costs and the system was used in model-predictive, or online replan-

ning setting. In that case the number of phases would correspond

to a future planning horizon, and not dictate the total duration of

the motion. The number and duration of phases could also be opti-

mized, although we have not tested this.

Perhaps the most exciting direction for future work is applying CIO

to a full physics model that takes into account the limb inertias

and non-linear interaction forces. Indeed we formulated the CIO

method so that it is directly applicable to such a model. We expect

this to significantly enhance the realism/style of the resulting move-

ments, particularly in behaviors where saving energy is important.

While we do not anticipate any significant obstacles, how efficient

the method will be in the context of these more challenging opti-

mization problems remains to be seen. It may turn out that a hybrid

approach is preferable, where we first use the present simplified

model to obtain a solution that already looks quite good, and then

optimize with respect to a full physics model to refine the solution.

Acknowledgments

We thank Tom Erez and Yuval Tassa for inspiring technical dis-

cussions. This research was supported in part by NSF, NIH, and

NSERC.


References

B

OUYARMANE



, K.,

AND


K

HEDDAR


, A.

2011. Multi-contact

stances planning for multiple agents. In ICRA, 5246–5253.

B

RUBAKER



, M. A., S

IGAL


, L.,

AND


F

LEET


, D. J. 2009. Estimat-

ing contact dynamics. In ICCV, 2389–2396.

C

HESTNUTT


, J. 2007. Navigation Planning for Legged Robots.

PhD thesis, Carnegie Mellon University.

CHI

W

U



, J.,

AND


P

OPOVIC


, Z. 2010. Terrain-adaptive bipedal

locomotion control. ACM Trans. Graph. 29, 4.

C

OROS


, S., B

EAUDOIN


, P.,

AND VAN DE

P

ANNE


, M.

2009.


Robust task-based control policies for physics-based characters.

ACM Trans. Graph. 28

, 5.

C

OROS



, S., K

ARPATHY


, A., J

ONES


, B., R

EV

´



ERET

, L.,


AND

VAN DE


P

ANNE


, M. 2011. Locomotion skills for simulated

quadrupeds. ACM Trans. Graph. 30, 4, 59.

DA

S

ILVA



, M., D

URAND


, F.,

AND


P

OPOVIC


, J. 2009. Linear

bellman combination for control of character animation. ACM

Trans. Graph. 28

, 3.


DE

L

ASA



, M., M

ORDATCH


, I.,

AND


H

ERTZMANN


, A.

2010.


Feature-Based Locomotion Controllers. ACM Trans. Graphics

29

, 3.



E

REZ


, T., T

ASSA


, Y.,

AND


T

ODOROV


, E. 2011. Infinite-horizon

model predictive control for periodic tasks with contacts. In

Robotics: Science and Systems

.

F



ALOUTSOS

, P.,


VAN DE

P

ANNE



, M.,

AND


T

ERZOPOULOS

, D.

2001. Composable controllers for physics-based character ani-



mation. In SIGGRAPH, 251–260.

F

ANG



, A. C.,

AND


P

OLLARD


, N. S. 2003. Efficient synthesis

of physically valid human motion. ACM Trans. Graph. 22, 3,

417–426.

G

RASSIA



, F. S. 1998. Practical parameterization of rotations using

the exponential map. J. Graph. Tools 3 (March), 29–48.

H

AUSER


, K. K., B

RETL


, T., L

ATOMBE


, J.-C., H

ARADA


, K.,

AND


W

ILCOX


, B. 2008. Motion planning for legged robots

on varied terrain. I. J. Robotic Res. 27, 11-12, 1325–1349.

H

ODGINS


, J. K.,

AND


P

OLLARD


, N. S. 1997. Adapting simulated

behaviors for new characters. In SIGGRAPH, 153–162.

H

ODGINS


, J. K., W

OOTEN


, W. L., B

ROGAN


, D. C.,

AND


O’B

RIEN


, J. F. 1995. Animating human athletics. In SIG-

GRAPH


, 71–78.

J

AIN



, S.,

AND


L

IU

, C. K. 2011. Controlling physics-based charac-



ters using soft contacts. ACM Trans. Graph. (SIGGRAPH Asia)

30

(Dec.), 163:1–163:10.



K

AJITA


, S., M

ATSUMOTO


, O.,

AND


S

AIGO


, M. 2001. Real-time

3D walking pattern generation for a biped robot with telescopic

legs. In Proc. ICRA, 2299–2306.

K

ALISIAK



, M.,

AND VAN DE

P

ANNE


, M. 2001. A grasp-based

motion planning algorithm for character animation. Journal of

Visualization and Computer Animation 12

, 3, 117–129.

K

OLTER


, J. Z., R

ODGERS


, M. P.,

AND


N

G

, A. Y. 2008. A control



architecture for quadruped locomotion over rough terrain. In

ICRA


, 811–818.

K

UFFNER



, J. J., N

ISHIWAKI


, K., K

AGAMI


, S., I

NABA


, M.,

AND


I

NOUE


, H. 2003. Motion planning for humanoid robots. In

ISRR


, 365–374.

K

UO



, A. D., D

ONELAN


, J. M.,

AND


R

UINA


, A. 2005. Energetic

consequences of walking like an inverted pendulum: step-to-step

transitions. Exercise and sport sciences reviews 33, 2 (Apr.), 88–

97.


L

EE

, S.-H.,



AND

G

OSWAMI



, A. 2010. Ground reaction force con-

trol at each foot: A momentum-based humanoid balance con-

troller for non-level and non-stationary ground. In IROS, 3157–

3162.



L

IU

, C. K., H



ERTZMANN

, A.,


AND

P

OPOVIC



, Z. 2005. Learning

physics-based motion style with nonlinear inverse optimization.

ACM Trans. Graph. 24

, 3, 1071–1081.

L

IU

, C. K., H



ERTZMANN

, A.,


AND

P

OPOVIC



, Z. 2006. Composi-

tion of complex optimal multi-character motions. In Symposium

on Computer Animation

, 215–222.

L

IU

, C. K. 2009. Dextrous manipulation from a grasping pose.



ACM Trans. Graph. 28

, 3.


M

ANCHESTER

, I. R., M

ETTIN


, U., I

IDA


, F.,

AND


T

EDRAKE


, R.

2011. Stable dynamic walking over uneven terrain. I. J. Robotic

Res. 30

, 3, 265–279.



M

ORDATCH


, I.,

DE

L



ASA

, M.,


AND

H

ERTZMANN



, A. 2010. Ro-

bust physics-based locomotion using low-dimensional planning.

ACM Trans. Graph. 29

, 4.


M

UICO


, U., L

EE

, Y., P



OPOVI

´

C



, J.,

AND


P

OPOVI


´

C

, Z. 2009.



Contact-aware Nonlinear Control of Dynamic Characters. ACM

Trans. Graphics 28

, 3, 81.

M

UICO



, U., P

OPOVIC


, J.,

AND


P

OPOVIC


, Z. 2011. Composite

control of physically simulated characters. ACM Trans. Graph.

30

, 3, 16.


P

OPOVIC


, Z.,

AND


W

ITKIN


, A. P. 1999. Physically based motion

transformation. In SIGGRAPH, 11–20.

P

RATT


, J., C

ARFF


, J.,

AND


D

RAKUNOV


, S. 2006. Capture point:

A step toward humanoid push recovery. In in 6th IEEE-RAS

International Conference on Humanoid Robots

, 200–207.

S

AFONOVA


, A., H

ODGINS


, J. K.,

AND


P

OLLARD


, N. S.

2004. Synthesizing physically realistic human motion in low-

dimensional, behavior-specific spaces. ACM Trans. Graph. 23,

3, 514–521.

S

EIPEL


, J. E.,

AND


H

OLMES


, P. 2005. Running in three dimen-

sions: Analysis of a point-mass sprung-leg model. I. J. Robotic

Res. 24

, 8, 657–674.



S

RINIVASAN

, M.,

AND


R

UINA


, A. 2005. Computer optimization

of a minimal biped model discovers walking and running. Nature

(Sept.).

S

TEPHENS



, B. 2011. Push Recovery Control for Force-Controlled

Humanoid Robots

. PhD thesis, Carnegie Mellon University.

S

UTTON



, R., P

RECUP


, D.,

AND


S

INGH


, S. 1999. Between mdps

and semi-mdps: A framework for temporal abstraction in rein-

forcement learning. Artificial Intelligence 112, 181–211.

T

ODOROV



, E. 2011. A convex, smooth and invertible contact

model for trajectory optimization. In ICRA, 1071–1076.

V

AN

D



E

P

ANNE



, M.,

AND


L

AMOURET


, A. 1995. Guided opti-

mization for balanced locomotion. In 6th Eurographics Work-

shop on Animation and Simulation, Computer Animation and

Simulation, September, 1995

, Springer, Maastricht, Pays-Bas,

D. Terzopoulos and D. Thalmann, Eds., Eurographics, 165–177.

V

UKOBRATOVIC



, M.,

AND


B

OROVAC


, B. 2004. Zero-moment

point - thirty five years of its life. I. J. Humanoid Robotics 1, 1,

157–173.

W

AMPLER



, K.,

AND


P

OPOVIC


, Z. 2009. Optimal gait and form

for animal locomotion. ACM Trans. Graph. 28, 3.

W

ANG


, J. M., F

LEET


, D. J.,

AND


H

ERTZMANN


, A. 2009. Opti-

mizing Walking Controllers. ACM Trans. Graphics 28, 5, 168.

Figure 2: Simplified Character Model. The features used in our

character description with collision capsule geometry overlaid.

W

ITKIN


, A.,

AND


K

ASS


, M. 1988. Spacetime Constraints. In

Proc. SIGGRAPH

, vol. 22, 159–168.

W

OOTEN



, W. L.,

AND


H

ODGINS


, J. K. 2000. Simulating leaping,

tumbling, landing, and balancing humans. In ICRA, 656–662.

Y

E

, Y.,



AND

L

IU



, C. K. 2010. Optimal feedback control for

character animation using an abstract model. ACM Trans. Graph.

29

, 4.


Y

IN

, K., L



OKEN

, K.,


AND VAN DE

P

ANNE



, M. 2007. Simbicon:

simple biped locomotion control. ACM Trans. Graph. 26, 3, 105.

Y

IN

, K., C



OROS

, S., B


EAUDOIN

, P.,


AND VAN DE

P

ANNE



, M.

2008. Continuation methods for adapting simulated skills. ACM

Trans. Graph. 27

, 3.


A

Simplified Character Model

Our simple model specifies character’s state q(s) at a particular

time through a small number of features, rather than a full set of

joint angles.

x =

p

c



r

c

p



1...N

r

1...N



T

(12)


Where p

c

and r



c

are torso position and orientation, respectively,

and p

i

, r



i

are end effector positions and orientations for each limb

i (see figure 2). Rotations are represented with exponential map

[Grassia 1998] because of its suitability in trajectory optimization.

From the above features, we can reconstruct the actual character’s

pose, including limb base locations b

i

, which can be derived from



local location points on the torso. We assume character’s limbs

have two links, which allows us to analytically solve for middle

joint location m

i

and orientations of the two links. For limbs that



have more than two links, it would be necessary to use an iterative

inverse kinematics method to derive the individual joint locations.

We define the motion with positions and velocities of our features at

the boundaries between phases. Cubic splines with knots at phase

boundaries are used to define a continuous feature trajectory from

which positions, velocities, accelerations at any point in the trajec-

tory can be computed. Combining contact variables for the phase

into a vector c, the solution vector s ∈ R

(12(N +1)+N )K

that we


optimize is

s =


x

1...K


˙

x

1...K



c

1...K


T

(13)


The dynamics of our simple model correspond to those of a single

rigid body with multiple forces acting on it from rectangular contact

surfaces. In this setting, contact forces can efficiently be solved

using either the approach of [Stephens 2011] or [Lee and Goswami



2010].


Dostları ilə paylaş:
1   2   3   4   5   6


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©genderi.org 2017
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə