Estimating Relative Risk Aversion, Risk-Neutral and Real-World Densities using Brazilian Real Currency Options



Yüklə 276,09 Kb.
Pdf görüntüsü
tarix17.09.2018
ölçüsü276,09 Kb.
#68787



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

ISSN 1518-3548 



CGC 00.038.166/0001-05 

Working Paper Series 

Brasília 

n. 269 


Mar. 

2012 


p. 1-20 


 

Working Paper Series 

 

 



 

 

Edited by Research Department (Depep) – E-mail: workingpaper@bcb.gov.br 



 

Editor: Benjamin Miranda Tabak – E-mail: benjamin.tabak@bcb.gov.br 

Editorial Assistant: Jane Sofia Moita – E-mail: jane.sofia@bcb.gov.br 

Head of Research Department: Adriana Soares Sales – E-mail: adriana.sales@bcb.gov.br  

 

The Banco Central do Brasil Working Papers are all evaluated in double blind referee process. 



 

Reproduction is permitted only if source is stated as follows: Working Paper n. 269. 

 

Authorized by Carlos Hamilton Vasconcelos Araújo, Deputy Governor for Economic Policy. 



 

 

 



General Control of Publications 

 

Banco Central do Brasil 



Secre/Comun/Cogiv 

SBS – Quadra 3 – Bloco B – Edifício-Sede – 1º andar 

Caixa Postal 8.670 

70074-900 Brasília – DF – Brazil 

Phones: +55 (61) 3414-3710 and 3414-3565 

Fax: +55 (61) 3414-3626 

E-mail: editor@bcb.gov.br 

 

 



 

The views expressed in this work are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect those of the Banco Central or  

its members. 

 

Although these Working Papers often represent preliminary work, citation of source is required when used or reproduced. 



 

 

As opiniões expressas neste trabalho são exclusivamente do(s) autor(es) e não refletem, necessariamente, a visão do Banco 

Central do Brasil. 

 

Ainda que este artigo represente trabalho preliminar, é requerida a citação da fonte, mesmo quando reproduzido parcialmente. 

 

 



 

Consumer Complaints and Public Enquiries Center 

 

Banco Central do Brasil 

Secre/Comun/Diate 

SBS – Quadra 3 – Bloco B – Edifício-Sede – 2º subsolo 

70074-900 Brasília – DF – Brazil 

Fax: +55 (61) 3414-2553 

Internet:  



Estimating Relative Risk Aversion, Risk-Neutral and Real-

World Densities using Brazilian Real Currency Options 

 

José Renato Haas Ornelas



*

 

 



José Santiago Fajardo Barbachan

**

 



 

Aquiles Rocha de Farias

***

 

 



Abstract 

 

The Working Papers should not be reported as representing the views of the Banco Central 

do Brasil. The views expressed in the papers are those of the author(s) and do not 

necessarily reflect those of the Banco Central do Brasil. 

 

 

Building Risk-Neutral Densities (RND) from options data can provide 



market-implied expectations about the future behavior of a financial 

variable. This paper uses the Liu et all (2007) approach to estimate the 

option-implied risk-neutral densities from the Brazilian Real/US Dollar 

exchange rate distribution. We then compare the RND with actual exchange 

rates, on a monthly basis, in order to estimate the relative risk-aversion of 

investors and also obtain a real-world density for the exchange rate. We are 

the first to calculate relative risk-aversion and the option-implied real world 

Density for an emerging market currency. Our empirical application uses a 

sample of exchange-traded Brazilian Real currency options from 1999 to 

2011. The RND is estimated using a Mixture of Two Log-Normals 

distribution and then the real-world density is obtained by means of the Liu 

et al. (2007) parametric risk-transformations. Our estimated value of the 

relative risk aversion parameter is around 2.7, which is in line with other 

articles that have estimated this parameter for the Brazilian Economy. Our 

out-of-sample evaluation results showed that the RND has some ability to 

forecast the Brazilian Real exchange rate. However, when we incorporate 

the risk aversion into RND in order to obtain a Real-world density, the out-

of-sample performance improves substantially. Therefore, we would suggest 

not using the “pure” RND, but rather taking into account risk aversion in 

order to forecast the Brazilian Real exchange rate. 



 

Keywords: Relative Risk Version, Risk-Neutral Density, Exchange Rate.  

JEL Classification: C53, C13, G17, F31. 

                                                 

*

 Banco Central do Brasil, Gerência-Executiva de Riscos Corporativos e Referências Operacionais; Ibmec 



Brasília. E-mail: 

jrenato.ornelas@bcb.gov.br

 

**

 Fundação Getúlio Vargas, Rio de Janeiro, EBAPE. E-mail: 



jose.fajardo@fgv.br

 

***



 Banco Central do Brasil, Departamento de Estudos e Pesquisas; Ibmec Brasília. E-mail: 

aquiles.farias@bcb.gov.br

 

3



1. Introduction 

 

 

Extracting market expectations is one of the most important tasks in economics 



and finance. Market expectations on financial variables may influence macroeconomic 

policy decisions.  It can be also useful for corporate and financial institutions decision 

making.  Many techniques have been applied in order to extract market expectations, 

among them building Risk-Neutral Density (RND) from options prices is one of the 

most used. In this sense the papers of Shimko (1993), Rubinstein (1994)  and Jackwerth 

and Rubistein (1996) were the first to empirically obtain RND. Using option-implied 

RND, one can calculate, for example, the probability that exchange rate will stay inside 

a specific range of values. Any empirical application in finance that that requires 

densities forecasts may also take advantage of Risk-neutral densities.  

 

On the other hand, many papers had focused its attention on the estimation of the 



relative risk aversion (RRA) from option prices. Once you have the RND and the 

subjective density, if these densities are not equal, the risk aversion adjustment indicates 

the investors’ preferences for risk. The first to recover empirically RRA was Jackwerth 

(2000). He used the historical density as the subjective density. There are other ways to 

obtain the RRA, as for example the approach introduced by Bliss and Panigirtzoglou 

(2004). 


 

Most of the works that have studied RRA estimation have used options on 

stocks. But, as pointed out by Micu (2005) and Bakshi, Carr and Wu (2008), it is 

important to address the same estimation using currency option data in order to obtain a 

global risk premium.  

 

In this paper we estimate RND from the Brazilian Real/US Dollar (USD/BRL) 



exchange rate option data and compares with actual exchange rates in order to estimate 

the relative risk-aversion of investors and also obtain a real-world density for the 

exchange rate distribution. This is done for a sample of USD/BRL options traded at 

BM&F-Bovespa from 1999 to 2011. The RND is estimated using a Mixture of Two 

Log-Normals distribution and then the real-world density is obtained by means of the 

Liu et al. (2007) parametric risk-transformations. The relative risk aversion is calculated 

for the full sample, and is in line with previous studies of the Brazilian economy using 

stock and consumption data. An out-of-sample goodness-of-fit evaluation is carried out 

to evaluate the performance of the risk-neutral and real world densities.  

4



 

Summing up our contributions are: We are the first to calculate RRA parameter 

for the Brazilian Real Exchange rate. Second, we evaluate the RND and RWD density 

forecasts for the USD/BRL and obtain a very good out-of-sample fit for the Real World 

Density, with mixed results for the RND.  

 

The paper is organized as follows: in Section 2 we give an overview of the RND 



extraction methods. In Section 3 we present the transformation to obtain the RWD. In 

Section 4 we present our estimation algorithm. In Section 5 we describe our sample 

data. In Section 6 we present our results and Section 7 concludes. 

 

 



2. Risk-Neutral Density (RND) 

 

 

Once we have a set of option prices for a specific time to maturity, we can 



recover the risk-neutral probability distribution (Ross, 1976). There are many methods 

for recovering this RND function implied in option prices. Jackwerth (1999) reviews 

this literature, and classify them into parametric and non-parametric methods. 

 

Parametric methods assume that the risk-neutral distribution can be defined by a 



limited set of parameters. Once defined the functional form of the distribution, we need 

to estimate the set of parameters.  For instance we can use the Generalized Beta of 

Second Kind or the Mixture of two log-Normals in order to obtain the RND.  Abe et all 

(2007) was the only paper so far that analyzed the forecast ability of RND for the 

Brazilian Real, and used the Generalized Beta of Second Kind. 

Non-parametric methods consist of fitting CDF’s to observed data by means of 

more general functions. Among the non-parametric methods are the kernel methods and 

the maximum-entropy methods. Kernel methods use regressions without specifying the 

parametric form of the function (for example, see Ait-Sahalia and Lo, 1998). 

Maximum-entropy methods fit the distribution by minimizing some specific loss 

function, as we can see in Buchen and Kelly (1996).  

In our paper, we use the Mixture of two Lognormals (M2N) method for 

recovering the risk-neutral distribution (RND). We will describe this method on section 

four. 


 

 

 



 

 

5




3. Risk Transformations methods 

 

 

Once we have a RND of an asset, we may use it to forecast its behavior. 



However, in many cases the actual behavior of the asset embeds a risk premium, which 

in the equity market is known as Equity Risk Premium. 

 

For short-term forecasts, this premium is usually small if compared with the 



volatility of the asset, so we can neglect it, and use just the RND. But for longer term, 

the size of this premium may be relevant. In this way, if we are trying to forecast over a 

longer time period, it would be important to use a distribution which includes the risk 

premium, and this is usually called “real-world” distribution. 

 

Transformations from a risk-neutral density g to a real-world density h can be 



derived by making assumptions about risk preferences. Liu et al. (2007) assume a 

representative agent with a power utility function and constant relative risk aversion 

(RRA) denoted by c. The marginal utility is proportional to x

-c

 and the real-world 



density is given by: 

 

݄ሺݔሻ ൌ  



ݔ

݃ሺݔሻ



׬ ݕ

݃ሺݕሻ݀ݕ



 



(3.1) 

 

 



In our paper, we use this transformation for the M2N distribution, as can be seen 

on next section. 

 

 

4. Methodology 



 

 

We use a Mixture of Log-Normals to model the Risk-Neutral Densities. More 



specifically, we model the future price of the exchange rate using a mixture of two 

lognormals densities g

 

݃ሺݔ|ݓ, ܨ


, ߪ


, ܨ


, ߪ


ሻ ൌ ݓ כ ݌݂݀

௅ே

ሺݔ|ܨ


, ߪ


ሻ ൅ ሺ1 െ ݓሻ כ ݌݂݀

௅ே

ሺݔ|ܨ


, ߪ


ሻ 

(4.1) 



     

with  


 

݌݂݀


௟௡

ሺݔ|ܨ, ߪሻ ൌ ൫ݔߪ√2ߨܶ൯

ିଵ

݁ݔ݌ ൭െ


1

2



logሺݔሻ െ ሺlogሺܨሻ െ  0.5ߪ

ܶሻ



ߪ√ܶ



൱ 

(4.2) 


 

 

 



 

6



We use the USD future contract exchange rate F to reduce the number of free 

parameters of the distribution.  We do that by making the expectation of the distribution 

equal to Dollar Future Contract price: 

   


ܨ ൌ ݓܨ

൅ ሺ1 െ ݓሻܨ



 

(4.3) 



                                                                                      

 

Therefore, we have a total of five parameters, but only four free parameters. This 



distribution is able to represent asymmetric and bimodal shapes. The parameters F

1

 and 



F

2

 are the expectation of the two distributions of the mixture, while the sigmas 



parameters determine volatility. 

The price of an European call option is the weighted average of two Black 

(1976) call option formulas C

b

(F, T, K, r, T): 



 

ܥሺܨ


, ߪ


, ݓ, ܭ, ݎ, ܶሻ ൌ ݓܥ

ሺܨ



, ߪ

, ݓ, ܭ, ݎ, ܶሻ ൅ ሺ1 െ ݓሻܥ



ሺܨ



, ߪ

, ݓ, ܭ, ݎ, ܶሻ  (4.4) 



  

 

The parameters estimation of the M2N was done using an adaptation of the 



algorithm of Jondeau and Rockinger

1

 for the Brazilian Real/U.S. Dollar Exchange rate 



option characteristics and data. This algorithm estimates parameters by minimizing the 

squared errors of the theoretical and actual option prices.  

 

Once we have the RND, we calculate the RRA parameter following the Liu et al. 



(2007) Parametric Risk transformation.  As seen on section 3, they consider the real-

world density h defined by (3.1) when there is a representative agent who has constant 

RRA equal to c. If g is a single lognormal density then so is h. The volatility parameters 

for functions g and h are then equal but their expected values are respectively F and 

exp(c

σ

2



T) when g is defined by (4.2). Thus, a transformed mixture of two lognormals is 

also a mixture of two lognormals. For a M2N g (x|

 ݓ, ܨ



, ߪ



, ܨ


, ߪ


) given by (4.1), it is 

shown by Liu et al. (2007) that the real-world density h is also a Mixture of Lognormals 

with the following density: 

 

݃෤ሺݔ|ݓ, ܨ



, ߪ


, ܨ


, ߪ


, ܿሻ ൌ ݄ሺݔ|ݓԢ, ܨ



, ߪ



, ܨ



, ߪ



ሻ 



(4.5) 

 

Where the new set of transformed parameter is: 



 

ܨ



ൌ ܨ


݁ݔ݌ሺcσ


Tሻ 



ܨ



ൌ ܨ

݁ݔ݌ሺcσ



Tሻ 



                                                 

1

 The original algorithm of Jondeau and Rockinger is available at the website: 



http://www.hec.unil.ch/MatlabCodes/rnd.html

. Among the changes we have done in the algorithm, we 

use formula (4.3) to reduce the number of parameters.  

7



1

ݓ



൰ ൌ 1 ൅ ൬

1 െ ݓ

ݓ

൰ ൬



ܨ

ܨ





݁ݔ݌൫

଴.ହ


ܶሺܿ

െ ܿሻሺσ



െ σ



ሻ൯ 



 

 

The real-world density has a closed-form representation because the cumulative 



function of the M2N density is simply a weighted combination of cumulative 

probabilities for the standard normal distribution. However, the calibration of this 

transformation requires the estimation of the RRA parameter c, which ideally should be 

calculated over a long time series of data.  

 

 

5. Dataset 



 

Our dataset consists of put and call option prices traded at BM&F Exchange 

from March 1999 to February 2011.  In order to avoid overlap of data, we took only 

options with about one month (20 business days

2

) before the expiration date, and this 



left us with 143 non-overlapping expiration cycles, since expiration dates are always in 

the first day of the month. The dataset has 1,460 daily average option prices, with 938 

calls and 522 puts. Therefore, we have built RND with 10.2 options on average.  

Besides the USD/BRL Options data, we have collected also data from the future 

contract of the USD/BRL exchange rate (DOL Futures) and futures contract of Average 

Rate of One-Day Interbank Deposit (DI Futures), both with expiration at the same date 

as of the respective option. Finally, for each expiration date we collected the USD/BRL 

spot exchange rate, called PTAX

3

, which is the underlying asset of both options and 



DOL futures. It is worth noting that all quotes in this market are done in terms of 

Brazilian Reais per U.S. Dollar, which means that an appreciation (depreciation) of the 

Brazilian Real decreases (increases) the exchange rate. 

We may have problems with the lack of synchronism between the traded time of the 

option and the DOL and DI Futures, since we are using the average price of the day. 

This may include some noise in our risk-neutral densities. 

The period of the sample starts just after the end of the almost-fixed exchange rate 

regime in Brazil. There were various upward shocks in the exchange rate (i.e. 

devaluation of the Brazilian Real) during the period, including the period of the 

                                                 

2

 When we had less than 5 options traded 20 business days before expiration, we used the business day 



before or after, depending on the liquidity. 

3

 The PTAX is the daily average spot exchange rate, calculated by the Central Bank of Brazil. The time 



period of the PTAX is one month lagged, since it is used to assess the RND and also to calculate the 

RRA.  


8


Brazilian elections in 2002 and the sub-prime crisis of 2008. Apart from these shocks, 

there is a downward trend in the exchange rate after the overshooting that followed the 

free-float in 1999, which means appreciation of the Brazilian Real against U.S. Dollar.   

 

6. Results 



 

6.1 Risk-Neutral Distribution Estimation 

 

 



We have extracted the risk-neutral densities using the M2N method for the 143 

expiration cycles, which are all non-overlapping. For estimation, we minimized the 

squared errors of the actual option price and the theoretical option price of the Risk-

Neutral Distribution. The mean squared error divided by the future exchange rate in our 

estimation was 0.21% and the median 0.0251%.  

 

6.2 Relative Risk Aversion Estimation 

 

 

We have calculated a Relative Risk Aversion (RRA) for the full sample using 



the log-likelihood function as in Liu et all (2007). This estimation takes the RND 

parameters estimated last section and then maximize the log-likelihood function with 

the RRA being the only free parameter. This is done for the 143 expiration cycles, 

which are all non-overlapping, as seen before. Therefore we have 143 RND g

i

’s 


estimated parameters set 

ࣂ෡



ൌ ൛࢝

ෝ, ࡲ


෢, ࣌


ෞ, ࡲ


෢, ࣌


ෞൟ  and aim to maximize the following 

function: 

 

  ෍ ݈݋݃ ቀ݃෤൫ܲܶܣܺ



௜ାଵ

|ߠ෠


, ܿ൯ቁ


୧ୀଵ


 

(6.1) 


 

 

The estimated RRA parameter c using equation 6.1 is 2.6959



4

 and the p-value of 

the null hypothesis of this parameter being equal to zero is 7.45%, so that there is 

evidence of some risk premium for the Brazilian Real.  

 

This is in line with previous papers that have performed RRA estimation for the 



Brazilian economy. Issler and Piqueira (2000), find GMM estimates between 0.891 and 

2.202 (median 1.70) using quarterly data with seasonal dummies and values between 

2.64 e 6.82 (median 4.89) using annual data for the period 1975 to 1994. Nakane and 

                                                 

4

 In fact, the RRA parameters calculated here are negative, since all our quotes are Brazilian Reais per 



U.S. Dollar, i.e., we are quoting the U.S. Dollar instead of our risky asset, the Brazilian Real. In order to 

have the RRA for our Risky asset, the Brazilian Real, we just change the signal. 

9



Soriano (2003), estimate values for the relative risk aversion between -0.1 and 4.3 using 

also GMM estimation. Catalão and Yoshino (2006), using quarterly data, obtain GMM 

estimates of 0.8845 and 2.119 for the period 1991 to mid 1994 (Pre Real Plan) and mid 

1994 to 2003 (Post Real Plan), respectively. Also, Araújo (2005) using GMM 

estimation found similar ranges with a quarterly data for the period 1974 to 1999. For 

constant relative risk aversion, he found a mean of 2.17. 

 

In order to assess estimation robustness we made some tests. If you take out the 



first 12 months of the sample the RRA parameter oscillates to 2.3056 with a p-value of 

15.85%. When you take out the last 12 months it goes to 2.5963 with a p-value of 

9.34%. This shows that there is some robustness on estimated data regarding sample 

changes. 

 

Another robustness exercise made was estimating 100 months rolling windows. 



The results are in table 1 and again show some robustness regarding the estimation. 

 

Table 1: Descriptive Statistics



Mean

2.568423


Standard Error

0.060239


Median

2.610596


Standard Deviation

0.395015


Variance

0.156037


Kurtosis

1.213372


Assimetry

-0.28524


Minimum

1.65493


Maximum

3.70964


 

 

6.3 Real-World Density 

 

 

Once we have the Relative Risk Aversion parameter and the Risk-Neutral 



Density, we calculate the Real-World Density using the Liu et al. (2007) Parametric 

Risk transformation as described on section 4. Graph 1 below shows typical 

distributions for our estimated RRA parameter (2.7). This is the densities on July 2006 

for options expiring on August 2006. Note that the Real World Density appears on the 

left of the RND, and this sounds counter intuitive, since the inclusion of risk-aversion 

usually shifts the distribution to the right. The explanation is that we are using the 

exchange rate quoted as Brazilian Real per US Dollar, i.e., we are not quoting the “risk” 

currency, but the other currency.  

10



We can check the differences between these two densities looking at the graph 2, 

which shows the difference between the Risk-Neutral and Real-World densities. We see 

that the RND has more mass to the right, as well as a fatter right tail. 

 

Graph 1 – Risk-Neutral and Real-World Densities for July, 2006 

 

 



 

Graph 2 – Risk-Neutral minus Real-World Densities for July, 2006 

 

 



 

 

 

 

 

 

1.9


2

2.1


2.2

2.3


2.4

2.5


2.6

x 10


4

0

1



2

3

4



5

6

x 10



-3

Risk-Neutral and Real-World Densities

 

 

RND



RWD

1.9


2

 

2.1



2.2

2.3


2.4

2.5


2.6

x 10


4

-4

-3



-2

-1

0



1

2

3



4

x 10


-4

 

Risk-Neutral minus Real-World Densities



11


6.4 Density Forecast Evaluation 

 

 



In this section, we evaluate the out-of-sample performance of the Risk-Neutral 

and Real-World densities. For the real world densities, we need to choose a RRA 

parameter in order to use the risk-transformation. Although Liu et al. (2007) use their 

own estimates for the RRA, we consider that using the in-sample estimates for the RRA 

would make the evaluation not truly out-of-sample, since at least one parameter is 

estimated in-sample. 

 

However, in fact our estimates for the RRA are pretty much in line with articles 



that use data samples almost entirely before the beginning of our sample. In this way, 

we have decided to use an RRA varying from 0 (the Risk-Neutral) to 4. 

 

Our density forecast evaluation is based on Berkowitz (2001) and Crnkovic and 



Drachman (1996) and uses the following transformation in order to generate series U in 

the following way: 

 

ܷ ൌ ሼܷ


ሽ ൌ ൛݃෤


஼஽ி

ିଵ

൫ܲܶܣܺ



௜ାଵ

|ࣂ෡


, ܿ൯ൟ 


(6.2) 

 

 



 

 

  



 

 

If the forecast density models are good, this series U must be a Uniform 



distribution in the range [0, 1]. Berkowitz (2001) goes further and “normalize” this U 

series using the inverse of the standard normal distribution, generating a Z series: 

 

ܼ ൌ ሼܼ


ሽ ൌ ሼΦ


ିଵ

ሺܷ



ሻሽ 

(6.3) 


 

 

 

If the forecast density models are good, this series Z should follow Standard 

Normal distribution. Thus, we may apply usual normality tests like the Kolmogorov-

Smirnov in this series Z in order to assess the quality of the density forecast. Berkowitz 

(2001) proposes a test that besides testing standard normality, also tests for first order 

autocorrelation in the Z series. The Berlowitz Likelihood Ratio statistics must follow a 

߯





  distribution under the assumption that the density forecast model is good.  

 

Results are on Table 2: 



 

12



RRA

Kolmogorov 

Distance

p-value Berkowitz LR p-value

RND  0.00

0.1070.069

3.67

5

              



0.299

IP1 0.62


0.096

0.136


3.126

              

0.373

1.00


0.0870.216

2.898


              

0.408


1.50

0.080


0.302

2.719


              

0.437


IP2 1.70

0.078


0.331

2.685


              

0.443


2.00

0.073


0.420

2.675


              

0.445


AR 2.170.069

0.486


2.690

              

0.442

2.50


0.064

0.576


2.762

              

0.430

IS 2.70


0.062

0.629


2.832

              

0.418

3.00


0.0570.7

13

2.97



8

              

0.395

3.50


0.0570.7

24

3.319



              

0.345


4.00

0.0670.525

3.7

80

              



0.286

4.50


0.078

0.338


4.358

              

0.225

IP3 4.89


0.085

0.244


4.887

              

0.180

Table 2: Goodness of fit statistics for selected RRAs



IP1, IP2 and IP3 stand for Issler and Piqueira (2000) 

respectively seasonally adjusted quaterly data, quarterly 

data with seasonal dummies and annual data.

AR stands for Araujo (2003) and IS stands for In-sample 

estimation

 

 

 

 

 

 



 

0.04


0.05

0.06


0.07

0.08


0.09

0.10


0.11

0.12


2.00

2.50


3.00

3.50


4.00

4.50


5.00

5.50


0.0

0.5


1.0

1.5


2.0

2.5


3.0

3.5


4.0

4.5


5.0

Berkowitz 

LR Ratio

Relative Risk Aversion

Graph 3- Density Forecats Results 

Berkowitz LR

Kolmogorov Distance

Kolmogorov 

Distance

13



The RND would be rejected at 10% significance level considering the 

Kolmogorov distance, while the RWD would perform well, including the RRA=2.17 

estimated by Araujo(2003), which we believe is a true out-of-sample estimation for the 

RRA parameter, since his time period finishes near the beginning of our time period. A 

RRA around 3 would bring the best out-of-sample results using Kolmogorov as we can 

see on Graph 3. 

 

Regarding the Berkowitz LR test, both RRA and RWD performed well and 



passed the test. An RRA near 2 would bring the best performance using the Berkowitz 

approach as we can see on Graph 3. 

 

Overall, there is evidence that the addition of a risk premium in the RND using a 



risk-aversion parameter bring better results in the out-of-sample assessment.  

 

7. Conclusion 

 

We have estimated the USD/BRL option-implied Risk-Neutral Densities using 



the Mixture of Two Log-Normals method. We have also calculated the Relative Risk 

Aversion and the Real-World density, and performed an out-of-sample evaluation of the 

density forecast ability. This paper is the first to calculate the RRA parameter implied in 

option prices for an emerging market currency. Our estimated value of the RRA 

parameter is around 2.7, which is in line with other articles that have estimated this 

parameter for the Brazilian Economy, such as Araújo (2005) and Issler and Piqueira 

(2000). 

 

Our out-of-sample evaluation results showed that the RND has some ability to 



forecast the Brazilian Real exchange rate. Abe et all (2007) found also mixed results in 

the out-of-sample analysis of the RND forecast ability for exchange rate options. 

However, when we incorporate the risk aversion into RND in order to obtain a Real-

world density, the out-of-sample performance improves substantially, with satisfactory 

results in both Kolmogorov and Berkowitz tests. Therefore, we would suggest not using 

the “pure” RND, but rather taking into account risk aversion in order to forecast the 

Brazilian Real exchange rate. 

 

Given this good performance in the out-of-sample assessment, a suggestion for 



future research would be to use the Real-World Density forecasts calculated in this 

article for calculations of market risk and portfolio optimization. We would also suggest 

14



evaluating the use of other RND and RWD estimation methods other than the Mixture 

of Normals.  

 

  

15




REFERENCES 

 

ABE, M. M., CHANG, E. J. and TABAK, B. M. (2007) “Forecasting Exchange Rate 



Density using Parametric Models: The Case of Brazil”, Brazilian Finance Review Vol. 

5, no. 1, pp. 29-39. 

 

AIT-SAHALIA, Y. and LO, A. (1998) “Nonparametric Estimation of State-Price 



Densities Implicit in Financial Asset Prices”, Journal of Finance 53, No. 2, pp. 499-

547. 


 

ARAUJO, Eurilton (2005) “Avaliando Três Especificações Para O Fator De Desconto 

Estocástico Através da Fronteira de Volatilidade de Hansen E Jagannathan: Um Estudo 

Empírico Para o Brasil”,  Pesquisa e planejamento econômico v.35, n.1, pp. 49-74. 

 

BAKSHI, G., CARR, P., AND WU, L. (2008) “Stochastic risk premiums, stochastic 



skewness in currency options, and stochastic discount factors in international 

economies”, Journalof Financial Economics 87, pp. 132-156. 

 

BERKOWITZ, J. (2001) “Testing Density Forecasts, with Applications to Risk 



Management”, Journal of Business and Economic Statistics, 19(4): 465-474. 

 

BLACK, F. (1976) “The Pricing of Commodity Contracts”, Journal of Financial 



Economics3, 167-179. 

 

BLISS, R.R., and PANIGIRTZOGLOU, N. (2004). “Option implied risk aversion 



estimate”. Journal of Finance 59, 407–446. 

 

BREEDEN, D. and LITZENBERGER, R. (1978). “Prices of State Contingent Claims 



Implicit in Options Prices”, Journal of Business51, 621-651. 

 

BUCHEN, P., and M. KELLY (1996) “The Maximum Entropy Distribution of an Asset 



Inferred from Option Prices”, Journal of Financial and Quantitative Analysis 31, No. 1, 

pp. 143-159. 

 

CAMPA, José Manuel, CHANG, P. H. Kevin and REFALO, James F. (1999) “An 



Options-Based Analysis of Emerging Market Exchange Rate Expectations: Brazil's Real 

Plan, 1994-1997”, NBER Working Paper No. W6929.  

 

CATALÃO, André and YOSHINO, Joe (2006) Fator de Desconto Estocástico no 



Mercado Acionário Brasileiro, Estudos Econômicos, São Paulo, 36(3): 435-463. 

 

CHANG, E. J. and TABAK, B. M. (2007) “Extracting information from exchange rate 



options in Brazil”, Revista de Administração da Universidade de São Paulo, V. 42, n. 4, 

pp. 482-496. 

 

COUTANT, Sofie, JONDEAU, Eric and ROCKINGER, Michael (2001) "Reading 



PIBOR Futures Options' Smile: The 1997 Snap Election", Journal of Banking and 

Finance, 2001, Vol 25, pp 1957-1987. 

 

16




CRNKOVIC, C. and DRACHMAN, J. (1996) “Quality control”, Risk, 9(7):138–143. 

 

DUTTA, Kabir and David F. BABBEL (2005) "Extracting Probabilistic Information 



from the Prices of Interest Rate Options: Tests of Distributional Assumptions", Journal 

of Business, 2005, vol. 78, no. 3. 

 

ISSLER, J., and PIQUEIRA, N. (2000) “Estimating Relative Risk Aversion, the 



Discount Rate, and the Intertemporal Elasticity of Substitution in Consumption for 

Brazil Using Three Types of Utility Function”, Brazilian Review of Econometrics, 20, 

200-238.

 

 



JACKWERTH, Jens C. and RUBINSTEIN Mark (1996) "Recovering Probability 

Distributions from Option Prices," Journ1al of Finance, 51, 1611-1631. 

 

JACKWERTH, Jens C. (1999) “Option-Implied Risk-Neutral Distributions and Implied 



Binomial Trees: A Literature Review”, Journal of Derivatives 7, No. 2, Winter 1999, 

pp. 66-82. 

 

JACKWERTH, Jens C. (2000) “ Recovering Risk Aversion from Option Prices and 



Realized Returns”

Review of Financial Studies, 13, No. 2,  pp. 433-451.

 

 

JONDEAU, Eric and ROCKINGER, Michael (2001) "Gram-Charlier Densities", 



Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control

 

LIU, Xiaoquan, SHACKLETON, Mark, TAYLOR, Stephen and XU, Xinzhong (2007) 



“Closed-form transformations from risk-neutral to real-world distributions”, Journal of 

Banking and Finance 31, pp. 1501-1520. 

 

MCDONALD, James (1984) “Some Generalized Functions for the Size Distribution of 



Income”, Econometrica, Vol. 52, No. 3, pp. 647-663. 

 

MELICK, W.R. and THOMAS, C.P. (1997). “Recovering an Asset’s Implied PDF from 



Option Prices”, Journal of Financial and Quantitative Analysis 32, pp. 91-115. 

 

MICU, Marian (2005) “Extracting expectations from currency option prices: a 



comparison of methods”, proceedings of 11

th 


International Conference on Computing in 

Economics and Finance, Washington DC, USA. 

 

NAKANE,  Márcio  and  SORIANO,  L.  (2003)  Real  Balances  in  the  Utility  Function: 



Evidence for Brazil, Working Paper No. 68, Banco Central do Brasil

 

ROSS, S. (1976) “Options and Efficiency”, Quarterly Journal of Economics 90, pp. 75-



89. 

 

RUBINSTEIN, M., (1994) "Implied Binomial Trees," Journal of Finance, 49, 771-818. 



 

SHIMKO, D. (1993) “Bounds of Probability”, Risk 6, pp. 33-37. 

 

17



Banco Central do Brasil 

 

 



Trabalhos para Discussão 

Os Trabalhos para Discussão do Banco Central do Brasil estão disponíveis para download no website 

http://www.bcb.gov.br/?TRABDISCLISTA 

 

Working Paper Series 

The Working Paper Series of the Central Bank of Brazil are available for download at 

http://www.bcb.gov.br/?WORKINGPAPERS 

 

 



 

 

 

 

235  Revisiting bank pricing policies in Brazil: Evidence from loan and 



deposit markets 

Leonardo S. Alencar 

 

Mar/2011 



236  Optimal costs of sovereign default 

Leonardo Pio Perez 

 

Apr/2011 



237  Capital Regulation, Monetary Policy and Financial Stability 

P.R. Agénor, K. Alper, and L. Pereira da Silva 

 

Apr/2011 



238  Choques não Antecipados de Política Monetária e a Estrutura a Termo 

das Taxas de Juros no Brasil 

Fernando N. de Oliveira e Leonardo Ramos 

 

Abr/2011 



239  SAMBA: Stochastic Analytical Model with a Bayesian Approach 

Marcos R. de Castro, Solange N. Gouvea, André Minella, Rafael C. Santos 

and Nelson F. Souza-Sobrinho 

 

Apr/2011 



240  Fiscal Policy in Brazil through the Lens of an Estimated DSGE Model 

Fabia A. de Carvalho and Marcos Valli 

 

Apr/2011 



241  Macro Stress Testing of Credit Risk Focused on the Tails 

Ricardo Schechtman and Wagner Piazza Gaglianone 

 

May/2011 



242 Determinantes 

do 

Spread Bancário Ex-Post no Mercado Brasileiro 

José Alves Dantas, Otávio Ribeiro de Medeiros e Lúcio Rodrigues Capelletto 

 

Maio/2011 



243  Economic Activity and Financial Institutional Risk: an empirical 

analysis for the Brazilian banking industry 

Helder Ferreira de Mendonça, Délio José Cordeiro Galvão and Renato Falci 

Villela Loures 

 

May/2011 



244  Profit, Cost and Scale Eficiency for Latin American Banks: 

concentration-performance relationship 

Benjamin M. Tabak, Dimas M. Fazio and Daniel O. Cajueiro 

 

May/2011 



245  Pesquisa Trimestral de Condições de Crédito no Brasil 

Clodoaldo Aparecido Annibal e Sérgio Mikio Koyama 

 

Jun/2011 



246  Impacto do Sistema Cooperativo de Crédito na Eficiência do Sistema 

Financeiro Nacional 

Michel Alexandre da Silva 

 

Ago/2011 

18



247  Forecasting the Yield Curve for the Euro Region 

Benjamim M. Tabak, Daniel O. Cajueiro and Alexandre B. Sollaci 

 

Aug/2011 



248  Financial regulation and transparency of information: first steps on new 

land 

Helder Ferreira de Mendonça, Délio José Cordeiro Galvão and Renato Falci 

Villela Loures  

 

Aug/2011 



249  Directed clustering coefficient as a measure of systemic risk in complex 

banking networks 

B. M. Tabak, M. Takami, J. M. C. Rocha and D. O. Cajueiro 

Aug/2011 

 

250  Recolhimentos Compulsórios e o Crédito Bancário Brasileiro 

Paulo Evandro Dawid e Tony Takeda 

 

Ago/2011 



251  Um Exame sobre como os Bancos Ajustam seu Índice de Basileia no 

Brasil 

Leonardo S. Alencar 

 

Ago/2011 



252  Comparação da Eficiência de Custo para BRICs e América Latina 

Lycia M. G. Araujo, Guilherme M. R. Gomes, Solange M. Guerra e Benjamin 

M. Tabak 

 

Set/2011 



253  Bank Efficiency and Default in Brazil: causality tests 

Benjamin M. Tabak, Giovana L. Craveiro and Daniel O. Cajueiro 

 

Oct/2011 



254 Macroprudential 

Regulation 

and the Monetary Transmission 

Mechanism 

Pierre-Richard Agénor and Luiz A. Pereira da Silva 

 

Nov/2011 



255  An Empirical Analysis of the External Finance Premium of Public  

Non-Financial Corporations in Brazil 

Fernando N. de Oliveira and Alberto Ronchi Neto 

 

Nov/2011 



256  The Self-insurance Role of International Reserves and  

the 2008-2010 Crisis 

Antonio Francisco A. Silva Jr 

 

Nov/2011 



257  Cooperativas de Crédito: taxas de juros praticadas e fatores  

de viabilidade 

Clodoaldo Aparecido Annibal e Sérgio Mikio Koyama 

 

Nov/2011 



258  Bancos Oficiais e Crédito Direcionado – O que diferencia o mercado de 

crédito brasileiro? 

Eduardo Luis Lundberg 

 

Nov/2011 



259  The impact of monetary policy on the exchange rate: puzzling evidence 

from three emerging economies 

Emanuel Kohlscheen 

 

Nov/2011 



260  Credit Default and Business Cycles: an empirical investigation of 

Brazilian retail loans 

Arnildo da Silva Correa, Jaqueline Terra Moura Marins, Myrian Beatriz 

Eiras das Neves and Antonio Carlos Magalhães da Silva 

 

Nov/2011 



261 The 

relationship 

between banking market competition and risk-taking: 

do size and capitalization matter? 

Benjamin M. Tabak, Dimas M. Fazio and Daniel O. Cajueiro 

 

Nov/2011 

19



262  The Accuracy of Perturbation Methods to Solve Small Open  

Economy Models 

Angelo M. Fasolo 

 

Nov/2011 



263  The Adverse Selection Cost Component of the Spread of  

Brazilian Stocks 

Gustavo Silva Araújo, Claudio Henrique da Silveira Barbedo and José 

Valentim Machado Vicente 

 

Nov/2011 



264  Uma Breve Análise de Medidas Alternativas à Mediana na Pesquisa de 

Expectativas de Inflação do Banco Central do Brasil 

Fabia A. de Carvalho 

 

Jan/2012 



265  O Impacto da Comunicação do Banco Central do Brasil sobre o 

Mercado Financeiro 

Marcio Janot e Daniel El-Jaick de Souza Mota 

 

Jan/2012 



266  Are Core Inflation Directional Forecasts Informative? 

Tito Nícias Teixeira da Silva Filho 

 

Jan/2012 



267 Sudden 

Floods, 

Macroprudention Regulation and Stability in an  

Open Economy 

P.-R. Agénor, K. Alper and L. Pereira da Silva 

 

Feb/2012 



268  Optimal Capital Flow Taxes in Latin America 

João Barata Ribeiro Blanco Barroso 

 

Mar/2012 



 

20


Yüklə 276,09 Kb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©genderi.org 2023
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə