Faktor penentu pemilihan bank dalam kalangan muslim: antara realiti dan ideal menurut gelagat pengguna berteraskan islam



Yüklə 171,53 Kb.
Pdf görüntüsü
tarix20.09.2018
ölçüsü171,53 Kb.
#69344


International Journal of Business and Social Science                      Vol. 2 No. 21 [Special Issue – November 2011]

 

157 



 

ISLAMIC CONSUMER BEHAVIOR (ICB): ITS WHY AND WHAT

1

 

 

Ahmad Azrin Adnan

2

 

Faculty of Business Management and Accountancy 

Universiti Sultan Zainal Abidin 

Gong Badak Campus 21300 Kuala Terengganu 

Terengganu, Malaysia 

 

Abstract 

 

Issues on consumption become more important to all groups of society. They are so as the changes of current  world 



economic directly affect the consumers and family economics regardless their level of income. The availability of many 

conventional  theories  and  models  of  consumer  behavior  were  seen  inadequate  to  educate  consumers  on  how  to 

consume  ethically,  eventually  to  overcome  the  current  consumption  issues.  What  went  wrong  with  the  conventional 

approaches  that  have  shown  positive  results  in  generating  economics  return?  Or  probably  failure  on  the  consumer 

side in translating all conventional approaches into action? Should the available approaches are not able to function 

as  desired,  is  there  any  other  alternative?  Generally,  this  article  tries  to  capture  these  questions.  Specifically,  this 

article attempts to examine the necessity of Islamic consumer behavior and how it should be  displayed in the Islamic 

framework.  Thus,  the  objective  of  this  article  is  two  folds.  One  is  to  identify  the  philosophy,  concept  and  motive  of 

conventional consumption. It shows the dominance of  few  conventional consumption approaches that are referred to 

when  studying  the  human  behavior.  Two  is  to  discuss  Islamic  critics  on  conventional  consumption  approaches.  The 

discussion  is  based  on  five  principles  of  Islamic  consumer  behavior,  such  as  Islamic  worldview  (tasawwur)  as 

consumption mould, ibadah as consumption  method, quality consumption as an act of choice, mechanisms of getting 

benefits in this world (al-dunya) and Hereafter (al-akhirah); and His consent (mardhatillah) as consumption motive.  

 

Key Words: Islamic consumer behavior, Religiosity, Muslim. 

 

1.0 Introduction 

 

Issues  on  consumption become  more important to all  groups  of society. They are so as the  changes  of current  world 



economic  directly  affect  the  consumers  and  family  economics  regardless  their  level  of  income.  The  availability  of 

many conventional theories and  models  of consumer behavior were seen inadequate to  educate consumers  on how to 

consume  ethically,  eventually to  overcome the current consumption issues, such as  wasteful use  of resources, labour 

and capital. That is why Sumner (2011) proposed the importance of understanding consumption inequalities rather than 

income inequalities by putting this statement: 

 

The  biggest  problem  with  income  is  that  it  doesn‘t  measure  what  people  think  it  measures:  resources 



available to people for consumption. Consider identical twins who both earn $100,000/year for 40 years. One 

consumes  all  her  income  immediately,  the  other  chooses  to  save  half  her  income  in  order  to  defer 

consumption  until  later.  In  that  case  there  is  no  meaningful  economic  inequality  –  both  have  identical 

resources,  and  identical  lifetime  consumption  in  present  value  terms.  But  the  high-saving  sibling  will  have 

vastly greater lifetime income, and will appear to be much more ―fortunate‖. My purpose here is not to argue 

that economic inequality is not important, or that we shouldn‘t do anything about it. Rather, I‘d like to argue 

that we should focus on consumption rather than income. For instance, one of the best things we could do is 

abolish  all  personal  and  corporate incomes  taxes,  and  replace  them  with  a  progressive  consumption  tax.  If 

you think of inequality in terms of income, then that change would look highly unfair, since much of income 

on capital goes to high earners. But that‘s an illusion, just like the two siblings that seemed very unequal in 

income terms, and yet had identical resources with which to consume. 

                                                

1

 This article has been presented at The Globalizing Religions and Cultures in The Asia-Pacific Conference, Australia  organized 



by the ARC Asia-Pacific Futures Research Network and The Adelaide Asian Studies Group, 1-5 December 2008. This article is 

neither meant to condemn various conventional consumption theories nor does it aims at analysing all conventional and Islamic 

views  on  consumption.  It  mainly  provides  few  observations  on  the  justification  to  propose  an  Islamic  consumer  behavior 

framework. 

 

2

  Dr.  Ahmad  Azrin  Adnan  is  Senior  Lecturer  at  Department  of  Finance  and  Banking,  Faculty  of  Business  Management  and 



Accountancy,  Universiti  Sultan  Zainal  Abidin  (formerly  known  as  Universiti  Darul  Iman  Malaysia).  Previously,  he  was  an 

Associate Researcher at the Centre for Islamic Development Management Studies (ISDEV), Universiti Sains Malaysia. 




The Special Issue on Contemporary Research in Arts and Social Science               

© Centre for Promoting Ideas, USA   

 

158 



 

Indeed,  inequality  in  consumption,  while  reducing,  is  still  high  as  revealed  by  Anup  Shah  (2008)  by  referring  the 

World  Bank  Development  Indicators  2008.  Overall,  the  20%  of  the  world‟s  people  in  the  highest-income  countries 

account for 86% of total private consumption expenditures, the poorest 20% a minuscule 1.3%.  

 

Anup  Shah  (2008)  also  asserted  that  today‟s  problems  of  consumption  and  human  development  are  getting  worse 



should this trends remain unchanged. He said:  

 

Today‘s consumption is undermining the environmental resource base. It is exacerbating inequalities. And the 



dynamics  of  the  consumption-poverty-inequality-environment  nexus  are  accelerating.  If  the  trends  continue 

without change — not redistributing from high-income to low-income consumers, not shifting from polluting to 

cleaner  goods  and  production  technologies,  not  promoting  goods  that  empower  poor  producers,  not  shifting 

priority from consumption for conspicuous display to meeting basic needs — today‘s problems of consumption 

and human development will worsen. 

 

The  above  statement  is  really  hard  to  be  denied  as  the  problems  of  starvation,  poverty  and  disaster  become 



increasingly.  For  instance,  most  of  the  households  in  US  are  now  facing  the  negative  wealth  net  value  due  to  the 

downfall of the house and share values. At the same time, they have to fulfill their loan commitment to the bank. The 

so-called sub-prime crisis was driven by greed and unethical economy of capitalism and mostly caused by the element 

of  negligence.  On  one  side,  the  financial  institutions  seemed  too  lenient  with  the  procedures  of  granting  loan  to  the 

borrowers. On the other side, the consumers put aside their level of necessities and abilities to pay back the loan. For 

both  side,  the  most  importantly  is  the  ability  to  accumulate  wealth  irrespective  of  the  means  with  which  it  is  being 

accumulated.  

 

The  conventional  consumption  approaches  undoubtedly  have  provided  a  usable  guide  to  marketing  practice.  They 



manage not  only to  outline the  major sources  of  influence that producers should understand in  developing  marketing 

strategy, but also to overcome the marketing problems and capitalize on marketing opportunities. If that so, what went 

wrong  with  the  principles  and  methods  of  conventional  consumption  due  to  the  emergence  of  various  consumption 

issues nowadays?  What went wrong with the conventional approaches that have shown positive results in generating 

economics  return?  Or  probably  failure  on  the  consumer  side  in  translating  all  conventional  approaches  into  action? 

Should the available approaches certainly unable to function as desired, is there any other alternative? 

 

This  article  discusses  the  philosophy,  concept  and  motive  of  few  conventional  consumption  approaches  that  are 



referred to when studying the human behavior. It also attempts to discuss Islamic critics on conventional consumption 

approaches.  The  discussion  is  based  on  five  principles  of  Islamic  consumer  behavior,  such  as  Islamic  worldview 



(tasawwur)  as  consumption  mould,  ibadah  as  consumption  method,  quality  consumption  as  an  act  of  choice, 

mechanisms of getting benefits in this world (al-dunya) and Hereafter (al-akhirah); and His consent (mardhatillah) as 

consumption motive. 

 

2.0 Philosophy, Concept and Motive of Conventional Consumption 



 

An  understanding  of  consumer  behavior  (CB)  is  diverse.  Solomon  (2009)  defined  CB  as  the  study  of  the  processes 

involved  when  individuals  or  groups  select,  purchase,  use,  or  dispose  of  products,  services,  ideas,  or  experiences  to 

satisfy needs and desires. Walters (1974), Mowen (1993) and Schiffman & Kanuk (2004) agreed that CB is a learning 

or research on how an individual makes the decision to utilise all available resources such as time, money, and effort to 

acquire  items  that  related  to  consumerism.  Campbell  (1995)  explained  that  CB  is  a  complete  cycle  involving  the 

selection,  purchase,  use,  maintenance,  repairs  and  removal  of  any  goods  or  services.    Sarimah  Hanim  Aman  Shah 

(2005) asserted that CB encourages an individual not only to use his income to spend, but also increase the amount of 

income from time to time to meet all the needs and wants. Although these definitions of CB have some differences on 

the meaning, they lead to few main formulations. 

 

First, CB involves  various activities in the form  of tangible and  intangible,  including physical,  mental and  emotional 



matters.  Second,  CB  is  stimulated  by  certain  motivation,  internal  (perception,  learning,  personality,  attitude,  etc.)  or 

external (situational factors, reference groups, family, etc.). Third, the analysis unit of CB research is the users who can 

be divided into individual consumer or organizational consumer. Fourth, CB shows an ongoing process, starting from 

pre-purchase  activities  until  post-purchase  activities.  Fifth,  CB  involves  a  different  role  of  consumer  either  as 

influencer,  purchaser,  decision  maker  or  user.  There  are  differences  between  buyer  and  user,  and  between  user  and 

customer.  Sixth,  CB  is  different  for  each  individual.  However,  the  same  tendency  towards  using  certain  product  or 

service allows the researchers doing profiling process in order to create consumption pattern. 



International Journal of Business and Social Science                      Vol. 2 No. 21 [Special Issue – November 2011]

 

159 



 

Fundamental understanding of these formulations has led to some development of CB theories and models which were 

created  in  the  West  after  the  emergence  of  capitalism.  Generally,  most  researchers  agree  that  there  are  few  central 

questions in any theory of consumer behavior (Ratneshwar et al., 2000). One, what is the nature of motives and desires 

that  prompt  consumption  behaviors?  Two,  why  do  consumers  buy  and  consume  particular  products,  brands,  and 

services  from  the  multitude  of  alternatives  afforded  by  their  environment?  Three,  how  do  consumers  think  and  feel 

about their strivings and cravings and how do they translate these pursuits into actions? Four, what explanation might 

we offer for differences in consumer motives and motives across individuals and situations?  

Based on the previous research trends, Huffman et al. (2000) stressed that the rapid growth and eclecticism of recent 

research  in  consumer  motives  has  led  to  valuable  but  highly  fragmented  insights.  Frequently,  these  studies  have 

directly  linked  the  being  side  of  life  (for  example  an  individual‟s  values  or  social  identity)  with  its  having  side 

(preferred  products  and  their  features),  typically  via  hierarchies  in  which  consumers‟  value  drive  the  desired 

psychological consequences of product consumption, and the latter, in turn, influence product preferences.   

 

From  various  CB  theories  and  models,  Faiers  et  al.  (2007)  concluded  that  Post-Keynesian  Theory,  Behavior  Theory 



Economics and Hierarchy of Needs Theory were used to examine consumer choice behavior. They further formulated 

that  Personality  Theory,  Control  Theory,  Self-Discrepancy  Theory,  Pro-Social  Behavior,  Perceived  Consumer 

Effectiveness,  Collective  Action  Dilemma,  Willingness  to  Pay  and  Value  Belief  Norm  Theory  were  referred  to 

understand the needs, values and attitudes of consumers.  

 

To  understand  the  aspects  of  learning,  Cognitive  Consistency,  Balance  Theory,  Consistency  Theory,  Cognitive 



Dissonance  Theory  and  Relational  Discrepancy  Theory  were  dominantly  used  as  a  basis  of  research.  While  Social 

Exchange Theory, Behavior Economic Theory and Behavior Perspective Model were more appropriate to comprehend 

the  aspects  of  social  learning.  They  further  revealed  that  the  Rational  Choice  Theory,  Theory  of  Reasoned  Action, 

Theory  of Planned  Behavior, Hierarchy  of Effects and Innovation Decision theory  were applicable to understand the 

purchase  behavior  amongst  consumers.  The  consumer  categorisation  aspect  was  studied  through  Behavioural 

Economic  Theory  and  Diffusion  Theory,  while  the  Attribute  Theory  and  Diffusion  Theory  were  used  to  grasp  the 

phenomenon of product features and categorisation. 

 

3.0 Islamic Critics on Conventional Consumption Approaches  

 

CB theories and models have apparently played their parts to find solutions to the problems of – basic premise of CB – 



limited  natural  resources  and  unlimited  human  desires.  This  is  where  the  concept  of  consumerism  and  ownership 

emerged  (Muhammad  Syukri  Salleh,  2003).  In  the  capitalist  system,  money  is  considered  as  the  only  stimulant  to 

consumerism  by  increasing  income  and  productivity  results.  Purchasing  power  derived  from  money  will  achieve 

consumerism utility or consumerism satisfaction (Muhammad Syukri Salleh, 2002).  

 

Consumption  according  to  conventional  perspective,  however,  appears  to  deny  the  concept  of  the  actual  owner,  i.e 



anything exists in the universe belongs to God. This is because of its nature as an anti-dogmatic and anti-theology that 

can lead to the „wrong‟ understanding from Islamic perspective. In this matter, it refers to the influence of substructure 

(economy) over superstructure (religious, legal, government, culture, etc.) (Muhammad Syukri Salleh, 2008 citing the 

views of Karl Marx).  

 

Its  goal  is  only  limited  to  human  interests  as  a  „consumer‟  without  looking  at  its  relationship  with  the  purpose  of 



worship.  Interests  of  individuals  are  more  preferred  to  achieve  all  self-desires  based  on  rational  consideration  and 

logic.  Hence,  the  property  acquired  is  wholly  owned  by  an  individual  and  can  be  spent  by  themselves  without  any 

interference from others. This built relationship is only limited to man-to-man relationship (hablumminannas) without 

achieving  the  more  important  dimension,  namely  man-to-God  relationship  (hablumminallah)  (Muhammad  Syukri 

Salleh,  2002:71).  This  argument  is  consistent  with  Siddiqi‟s  (1982)  conclusion  on  three  major  assumptions  of 

conventional economic methodology. First, every human being is selfish and rational in behavior; second, individual‟s 

main goal is to add material, and third, each individual has absolute freedom to maximize the welfare. Therefore, the 

concept  of  zakat  payment,  leaving  the  matter  of  syubhah  in  the  sale  and  purchase  transactions,  avoiding  the 

transactions  which  involve  riba,  gambling,  gharar,  falsehood  or  fraud  and  others  are  ignored  in  the  conventional 

consumerism discourse. 

 

Theoretically,  man‟s  behavior  from  the  conventional  perspective  is  selfish  by  nature.  He  leads  a  dual  existence, 



material and spiritual neatly divided. Max Weber (1958), for example, states that “economic man‟s” behavior is based 

on  rigorous  calculations  directed  with  the  foresight  and  caution  towards  “economic  success”  or  ability  to  acquire 

economic power.  



The Special Issue on Contemporary Research in Arts and Social Science               

© Centre for Promoting Ideas, USA   

 

160 



 

Max Weber‟s proposition actually represents conventional views on consumer behavior theory that has emerged from 

“economic  rationalism”  and  “utilitarianism”.  This  proposition  has  gained  a  lot  of  criticism  especially  by  Muslim 

scholars who argued the capability of conventional consumer behavior theory to understand the extrinsic and intrinsic 

elements of the real human beings. To them, it is not right to deal human beings mathematically nor do human beings 

have full foresight or complete caution.  

 

Obviously,  conventional  consumer  behavior  theory  is  always  associated  with  the  materialistic  and  individualistic 



philosophy of life. Hence, every individual member competes with one another to acquire maximum material wealth. 

As for producer, the norm of the society is to maximize profit. On consumers‟ side, it is expected to see their behaviors 

on how to maximize utility with income as the constraint. Therefore, productivity should be increased in order to have 

more income that will reflect the purchasing power. In the end, the mass consumption and utility maximization are the 

ultimate goals.  

 

Moreover, according to conventional perspective, in the aspect of God relationship, the relationship between God and 



the universe  including  human being  is  only temporary. In the aspect  of  human freedom, people are believed to  have 

absolute freedom  in  determining the  direction of their life. For example, Theory  of Reasoned  Action  (TRA) assumes 

that when someone has the intention to act, he or she will have a freedom to act without any limitation. In the aspect of 

purpose  of  life  and  the  fact  of  human  life,  living  in  the  world  is  the  most  preferred.  Hence,  the  effect  of  certain 

behavior is more concentrated than spiritual influence in reflecting certain behavior. 

 

These  three  aspects  clearly  deny  the  role  and  functions  of  human  being  as  a  slave  and  the  Caliph  of  Allah.  In  other 



words, human being typically is seen as an economic creature who should consume the natural resources available as 

much  as  possible  to  meet  all  the  self-satisfaction.  As  long  as  it  does  not  violate  any  laws  and  regulations  of  human 

creation,  self-satisfaction  should  be  put  in  the  first  place  in  order  to  recognize  the  self-existence.  Starting  with  the 

physiological  needs,  safety,  social,  esteem  and  self-actualization  as  highlighted  by  Maslow  Hierarchical  Needs,  this 

theory  is only limited to the  horizontal  nature  of the relationship. If the behavior shows the  vertical relationship, it  is 

not more than the behavior based on rituals without having any relevancy to the way of life. 

 

With  different  philosophical  underpinnings  of  conventional  consumption  approaches  as  opposed  to  Islamic  views, 



Muslims have no other alternatives to ideally understand the consumption behavior of Muslims rather than reviewing 

the real concept of Islamic consumer behavior.  

 

3.1 Islamic Worldview (Tasawwur) as Consumption Mould 

 

Man‟s behavior from Islamic perspective is governed by Islamic worldview. In this regard, Islamic worldview refers to 



the vision of reality and truth that appears before our mind‟s eye revealing what existence is all about (al-Attas, 1994). 

It is not only for the goodness of individual himself but also every member of the society regardless his religion. In one 

of the verses of the Quran, Allah says: ―It is not righteousness that you turn your faces towards East or West; but it is 

righteousness to believe in God and the last day, and the angles and the Book, and the messengers; to spend of your 

substance, out of love for Him, for your kin, for orphans, for the needy, for the wayfarer, for those who ask, and for the 

ransom of slaves; to be steadfast in prayer, and practice regular charity; to fulfill the contracts which you have made.‖ 

(Al-Baqarah, 2:177).  

 

Having  mentioned  that,  the  concept  of  tawhid



3

  will  become  the  most  priority  for  every  Muslims  that  touches  upon 

man-Allah  relationships  (Hablunminallah),  man-man  relationships  (Hablunminannas)  and  man‟s  relationship  with 

other  creations  of  Allah.  This  philosophical  foundation  of  the  Islamic  society  will  eventually  create  peaceful 

surroundings  between  consumers  (buyers)  and  producers  (sellers)  whereby  every  member  will  cooperate  with  each 

other  to  satisfy  their  needs  and  desires  respectively.This  vertical  relationships  (man-Allah  relationships)  apparently 

have not ever been discussed in any conventional theory of consumer behavior. In fact, it is the main foundation that 

will  affect  the  entire  structure  of  Islamic  consumption.    As  discussed  earlier,  means-end  research  and  social  identity 

theory have focused on structural issues and linkages between goals at the level of being (or self) and lower-order goals 

such  as  preferred  product  features.  These  two  paradigms  have  given  relatively  little  attention  to  cognitive  process 

issues  that  definitely  put  aside  the  spiritual  part.  To  Islam,  material  and  spiritual  needs  should  go  hand  in  hand  in 

harmony. In many cases, spiritual needs should be put in the first place as compared to material needs. 

                                                

3

 Al-Tawhid means belief in the oneness of Allah as the central theme of Islam, which enables men to understand everything that 



exists in the universe. This core belief consists of its various principles, which promote spiritual and moral enhancement as well as 

material success. 




International Journal of Business and Social Science                      Vol. 2 No. 21 [Special Issue – November 2011]

 

161 



 

Undoubtedly,  the  four  approaches  (means-end  chain,  social  identity  theory,  behavioral  decision  theory  and  attitude 

theory) vary in their emphasis on contextual factors as argued by Huffman et al., (2000). To them, behavioral decision 

theory, for example, heavily stresses the role of the immediate or proximal choice context, while social identity theory 

and  attitude  theory  stress  the  social  context  of  behavior.  In  terms  of  the  locus  of  consumer  behavior,  means-end 

research is almost perceived as the most person-centered, even though, it gives little attention to contextual factors.  

 

Despite  the  differences  between  these  four  approaches,  they  are  actually  similar  in  two  ways.  One,  the  approach 



towards  satisfaction  of  consumer‟s  wants  lie  purely  on  the  material  alone.  With  the  assumption  that  resources  are 

limited and human wants are unlimited, everybody strives to use limited resources selfishly and efficiently in fulfilling 

his unlimited wants.  Two, self-interest consideration becomes the most priority in any consumption activity, including 

spending for others for the purpose of tax exemption (self benefits) or recognition by others or etc.  



 

3.2 Ibadah as Consumption Method 

 

The  innermost purpose  of the  creation  of all rational beings is their cognition  (ma‘rifah) of the  existence  of  God. On 

that basis, Allah did not create humans but for one purpose and one goal, that is to submit to Him alone exclusively as 

mentioned by Allah: ―I have not created the invisible beings and men to any end other than that they may (know and) 



worship Me.‖ (Adz-Dzaariyaat, 51:56). However, the meaning of worship (ibadah) has been wrongly defined by many 

people even Muslims themselves. It is understood as establishing the prescribed forms of worship acts only specifically 

the five pillars of Islam

4

. Therefore, Islam is seen as a part of life,  not a complete  way  of  life as Ad‘deen. If that the 



reality,  it is not surprising to see  why  is religion  not  explicitly stated  in any conventional consumer behavior theory. 

Hamza  Salim  Lutfi  Khraim  (2000),  for  example,  argued  that  none  of  the  conventional  consumer  behavior  theories 

provides  an  explicit  way  on  the  role  of  religion  in  decision  making  in  the  different  steps  by  which  the  consumer 

decides  what  to  buy.  He  further  concluded  that  none  of  the  five  models  of  consumer  behavior  (Nicosia  Model, 

Howard-Sheth Model, Engel-Kollet-Blackwell Model, Bettman‟s Information Processing Model and Sheth-Newman-

Gross  Model  of  Consumption  Values)  can  be  said  to  represent  the  behavior  of  Muslim  consumers  in  the  way 

consumption decisions are made. 

 

The ibadah in Islam  means the ultimate  obedience, the ultimate submission and the ultimate  humility to  Allah along 



with  the  ultimate  love  for  Him.  According  to  this  definition,  Yusuf  Al-Qaradhawi  (1998)  explains  that  ibadah  must 

comply  with  two  conditions.  First,  following  what  Allah  has  legislated  and  what  His  messenger  has  called  for,  in 

commands,  in  prohibitions,  in  halal  (lawful)  and  in  haram  (unlawful).  This  is  what  represents  the  obedience  and 

submission to Allah. Second, following what Allah has legislated must be coming from a heart full of love to Allah.  

 

The useful social activities including consumption matters are considered as ibadah to Allah if they were meant to be 



for the sake of Allah. According to Mannan (1970), they are so many in the Quranic verses among which: principle of 

righteousness  that  allows  Muslims  to  consume  only  halal  things.  The  Quran  says:  ―O  mankind!  Partake  of  what  is 



lawful  and  good  on  earth,  and  follow  not  Satan‘s  footsteps:  for,  verily,  he  is  your  open  foe.‖  (Al-Baqarah,  2:168)

principle of cleanliness that urges Muslims to consume something which is physically and spiritually clean. The Quran 

says:  ―Never  set  foot  in  such  a  place!  Only  a  house  of  worship  founded,  from  the  very  first  day,  upon  God-

consciousness is worthy of thy setting foot therein – [a house of worship] wherein there are men desirous of growing in 

purity: for God loves all who purify themselves.‖ (At-Taubah, 9:108), principle of moderation that guides Muslims to 

conduct  an  ideal  consumption  activities.  The  Quran  says:  ―O  children  of  Adam!  Beautify  yourself  for  every  act  of 



worship,  and  eat  and  drink  [freely],  but  do  not  waste:  verily,  He  does  not  love  the  wasteful!‖  (Al-A‘raaf,  7:31)

principle of morality that reminds Muslims to always remember Allah and feel the Divine presence when conducting 

consumption  activities.  The  Quran  says:  ―And  in  whatever  condition  thou  mayest  find  thyself,  [O  Prophet]  and 

whatever  discourse  of  this  [divine  writ]  thou  mayest  be  reciting,  and  whatever  work  you  [all,  O  men],  may  do  – 

[remember that] We are you witness [from the moment] when you enter upon it: for, not even an atom‘s weight [of 

whatever there is] on earth or in heaven escapes thy Sustainer‘s knowledge; and neither is there anything smaller than 

that, or larger, but is recorded in [His] clear decree.‖ (Yunus, 10:61) and other principles. 

 

3.3 Quality Consumption as an Act of Choice 

 

The word quality has many different definitions. Conventional definitions of quality conventionally describe a quality 

item as one that wears well, is well constructed, and will last a long time. Still another definition conveys the image of 

excellence, first-rate, the best.  

                                                

4

 The five pillars of Islam includes (1) syahadah, (2) prayer, (3) zakah, (4) fasting; and (5) hajj.  




The Special Issue on Contemporary Research in Arts and Social Science               

© Centre for Promoting Ideas, USA   

 

162 



 

Apart  from  conventional  definitions,  marketers  competing  in  the  fierce  international  market  place  are  increasingly 

concerned  with  the  strategic  definition  of  quality:  meeting  the  needs  of  consumers  (Arthur  &  Irving,  1992).  In  other 

words,  the  marketers  will  provide  anything  in  order  to  satisfy  consumers  by  meeting  their  explicit  and  implicit 

expectations. The question of whether Muslims behave according to Islamic teachings or not is not important at all. 

 

Quality from Islamic point of view has different meaning as opposed to all conventional definitions. One of the aspects 



that differs both perspective  is  its  measurement.  In Islam,  material and spiritual rewards should be aimed together in 

order to achieve His blessings as the real motive of consumption. Without denying the importance of maximizing the 

productivity,  the  more  importantly  is  to  what  extent  the  consumption  practices  are  able  to  improve  man-Allah 

relationship  (Hablunminallah),  man-man  relationship  (Hablunminannas)  and  man‟s  relationship  with  other  creations 

of Allah.  

 

In  the  context  of  quality  and  consumption  from  Islamic  perspective,  Fazlur  Rahman  (1991)  explains  about  the  word 



‟chastity‟ as one of the important aspects of Islamic consumption. He further concludes that Islam urges its ummah to 

not only use a lawful things but also  a quality products or services. Mohd Sabri Abd. Ghafar (2007) also stresses the 

same  thing  by  giving  an  example  in  the  aspect  of  muamalat.  To  him,  Islam  allows  khiyar  (option)  in  order  to  give 

satisfaction to both parties, buyer and seller. In a Hadith of the Prophet (pbuh), it says: ‖The buyer and the seller have 



the option (of cancelling the contract), as long as they have not separated; then, if they both speak the truth and make 

it manifest, their transaction shall be blest, and if they conceal and tell lies, the blessing of their transaction shall be 

obliterated.‖ (Sahih Bukhari). It clearly shows that Islam only recognizes the trading that contains elements of quality 

physically and spiritually. This same view to quality consumption is advanced by Kahf (t.t) who states that: 

 

A survey of the Quran provides us with a unique concept of goods. The Quran always refers to consumable 

goods  by  using  terms  which  attributes  moral  and  ideological  values  to  them.  Two  terms  are  used  in  this 

respect: (1) tayyibat and (2) rizq. 

 

He further elaborates: 

 

The first term, tayyibat, is repeated eighteen times in the Quran. In his English translation of this term, Yusuf 

Ali  has  interchangeably  used  five  different  phrases  to  express  the  ethical  and  spiritual  values  of  the  term. 

According to him, tayyibat means: ‖good things‖, ‖good and pure things‖, ‖clean and pure things‖, ‖good 

and  wholesome  things‖,  and  ‖sustenance  of  the  best‖.  Thus,  consumer  goods  are  intimately  tied  up  with 

values in Islam. They denote the values of goodness, purity and wholesomeness. In contrast, bad, impure and 

worthless  objects  cannot  be  used  nor  considered  as  consumer  goods.  The  second  term,  rizq,  and  its 

derivatives are repeated in the Quran one hundred and twenty times. In Yusuf Ali‘s translation of the Quran, 

rizq is interpreted as follows: ‖Godly sustenance‖, ‖Divine bestowal‖, ‖Godly provision‖, and ‖Heavenly 

gifts‖.  All  these  meanings  convey  the  connotation  that  God  is  the  true  Sustainer  of  and  Provider  for  all 

creatures, i.e., whatever we get as consumption goods are all given from God. 

 

Having  mentioned all that he  defines consumer  goods from Islamic perspective as the God-given, useful, clean, 

wholesome,  beneficial  consumable  materials  whose  utilization  brings  about  material,  moral  and  spiritual 

betterment of the consumer. In other words, prohibited materials are not considered goods in Islam and valueless 

in  exchange  or  otherwise.  It  is  thus  far  clear  from  the  above  discussion,  goods  must  morally  clean  and  pure  as 

well  as  exchangeable  in  the  market  in  order  to  gain  an  economic  utility.  Besides,  by  looking  at  view  by  Imam 

Mohamed Baianonie (1997) pertaining to the conditions to achieve an ideal behavior, quality consumption should 

consists of the following things: 

 

1.

 



Restricted to only lawful goods or services. 

2.

 



Consumption activity has to be accompanied by a good intention. 

3.

 



Consumption activity has to be performed with excellence. 

4.

 



Consumption  activity  has  to  be  within  the  limits  of  Allah.  Hence,  there  must  be  no  room  for  injustice, 

disobedience of Allah or mistrust. 

5.

 

Consumption activity must not keep someone away from his Deen obligations like prayer, fasting etc.  



 

3.4 Mechanisms of Getting Benefits In This World (Al-Dunya) and Hereafter (Al-Akhirah) 

 

The objectives of performing an economic activity from Islamic perspective are to enjoy the bounty of Allah by the use 

of His provided resources to know His glory and power, to serve Him more and to increase relationship with Him. The 

wealth  accumulation  and  various  forms  of  economic  activities  including  consumption  activities  are  considerate  as 

worship.  



International Journal of Business and Social Science                      Vol. 2 No. 21 [Special Issue – November 2011]

 

163 



 

To achieve so, Islam teaches his followers that there is life after death. This belief will guide an individual‟s behavior 

in the area  of consumption. In  order to achieve success, he  has to consider the  effect of an action on  life after death. 

Therefore,  a rational  Muslim  in  his  consumption  activities  will  always  beware  of  this  factor  in  order  to  optimize  the 

immediate utility for this life and that of the Hereafter.  In fact, if  he  optimizes  his present consumption, for  example 

moderation in consumption, he will be able to have extra ability to help others for the sake of Allah. 

 

In line with the above discussion, Kahf (t.t) stresses the concept of „Time Horizon of Consumer Behavior‟. According 



to him, there is a strong relationship between belief in the Day of Judgment and the Afterlife with belief in God. This 

extends the Muslim‟s horizon of time beyond death. Life before death and life after death are closely interrelated in a 

sequential  manner.  Based  on  this  basis,  he  advanced  two  effects  which  reflect  the  way  of  consumption.  First,  the 

outcome of a choice of action becomes a total of two components: its immediate effect in this life and its later effect in 

the  life  to  come.  Therefore,  the  utility  derived  from  such  a  choice  is  total  of  the  present  values  of  these  two  effects. 

Second, the number of alternative uses of one‟s income is increased by including usages whose benefits that will be 

gained  only  in  the  Hereafter.  He  further  asserted  that  such  uses  of  income  have  not  ever  been  discussed  in  Max 

Weber‟s  rationalism.  The  more  importantly  is  to  have  material  in  this  worldly  life.  Thus,  many  alternative  uses  of 

one‟s income may have positive utility in the Islamic frame of reference, although their benefits in the utilitarian frame 

of reference may be zero or negative. 

 

There is no doubt that man is mortal and his soul shall taste death as well as all living beings that exist will taste death 



in their given time. Everything belongs to Allah and man only acts as a property holder. He is given certain things on 

earth as an amanah within certain period of time and he will be tested by Allah whether he is able to avoid from the pit 

of selfishness,  greed and injustice  or  not, as Allah prescribes: ―He  who has  created death as  well as life, so that He 

might  put  you  to  a  test    [and  thus  show]  which  of  you  is  best  in  conduct,  and  [make  you  realize  that]  He  alone  is 

almighty,  truly  forgiving.‖  (Al-Mulk,  67:2).  Hence,  doing  an  ideal  consumption  activity  (for  example,  spending  for 

others  for  the  sake  of  Allah)  is  in  fact  in  line  with  the  concept  of  Allah  fearing  which  consequently  will  lead  to  the 

achievement of success (falah).  

 

In  this  respect,  Nik  Mustapha  Nik  Hassan  (1996)  suggests  an  Islamic  method  on  how  to  allocate  the  income  for 



spending.  Elaborating  on  this  suggestion,  he  provides  the  following  guidelines.  To  zakatable  individuals,  one  should 

spend  for  (1)  zakat,  (2)  one‟s  needs  and  the  needs  of  one‟s  dependents,  (3)  saving  for  future  needs;  and  (4)  any 

righteous  act  for  the  sake  of  Allah.  To  non-zakatable  individuals,  the  spending  for  zakat  is  exempted  while  others 

remain unchanged. 

 

It is clear that consumption activities should be seen from comprehensive  views.  It is  not  only an instrument to  gain 



benefits in this world, but also an instrument to prove a total submission to Allah‟s commands.  

 

3.5 His Consent (Mardhatillah) as Consumption Motive.  

 

According to many Western scholars (Bettman, 1979: Hawkins et al., 1980: Chisnall, 1995: Solomon, 2002), there are 



four main applications of consumer behavior. First is for marketing strategy. Second is for public policy. Third is for 

social  marketing.  Fourth  is  for  consumers  to  educate  them  on  how  to  be  a  good  consumer.  Specifically  in  the  last 

application  (consumers),  we  have  been  explained  through  various  conventional  theories  of  consumer  behavior  that 

utility  maximization  is  the  ultimate  goal  (Kahf,  1981).  Under  this  kind  of  motive,  Khan  (1992)  stressed  that 

conventional theory of consumer behavior is driven by the following premises: 

 

1.



 

It is assumed that a consumer will decide what to consume and how much to consume only to gain the material 

benefits and satisfaction. 

2.

 



It is assumed that all of his consumption is geared toward satisfying his owns needs, he is not bothered about 

satisfying anyone else‟s needs. 

3.

 

It  is  assumed  that  a  consumer  behaves  rationally



5

.  This  among  other  means  the  consumer  will  be  neither  a 

miserly nor unnecessarily spendthrift; and he will not hoard his wealth. 

 

The concept of utility maximization is totally  different between conventional and Islamic views. According to Siddiqi 



(1981), Muslims  who  lives under the influence  of  Islamic spirit possesses a certain kind  of behavioral pattern  in line 

with the Islamic teachings.  

                                                

5

  In  the  context  of  rationalism,  Kahf  (t.t)  argued  that  rationalism  is  one  of  the  most  loosely  used  terms  in  economics,  because 



anything can be rationalized with reference to some relevant set of axioms. The axioms of rationalization are ethically and culturally 

determined and differ in various fields of life.  




The Special Issue on Contemporary Research in Arts and Social Science               

© Centre for Promoting Ideas, USA   

 

164 



 

Eventually, Muslims consumer is able to reject any utilities (satisfaction) which  contradicts to Islam. Despite the fact 

that  utility  factor  is  something  universal,  Islamic  consumption  activities  are  always  associated  with  the  concept  of 

„Islamic  Standard  of  Satisfaction‟.    This  guided  decision  has  been  revealed  by  Quran  with  the  term  ‗al-rushd‘  that 

refers to „mature‟, „wisdom‟ and „power to enforce obedience‟ (Ahmad Azrin Adnan & Wan Mohd Yusof Wan Chik, 

2008). Muslims society of ‗al-rushd‘ always realize and develop all dimensions of their physical, moral, spiritual and 

rational aspects comprehensively and  harmoniously  in order to achieve the  divine purpose  of His creation. Realizing 

their roles in current economic cycle, every single dollars and cents they earn and spend will affect the prosperity of the 

entire economic systems.  

 

The above discussion has led Muslims scholars to redefine the premises that can be based in the process of developing 



the  Islamic  theory  of  consumer  behavior.  Nik  Mustapha  Nik  Hassan  (1996),  for  example,  asserted  the  following 

premises for Islamic theory of consumer behavior: 

 

1.

 



A consumer will be assumed to decide what and how to consume in order to fulfill his needs and the needs of 

his dependents as this is his immediate responsibility. 

2.

 

In  line  with  tawhid,  a  consumer  is  assumed  to  consider  the  welfare  of  his  fellowmen  and  other  creations  of 



Allah from his consumption activity. 

3.

 



A consumer will be assumed to always consider consumption as an activity that can lead to the achievement of 

falah.  This  in  fact  is  a  rational  behavior.    He  would  not  disgrace  himself  by  bowing  in  reverence  to  any 

creature and  not be suppliant to anyone  else. His  determination, patience and perseverance  encourage  him  in 

fulfilling all his obligations. He relies on Allah and places his trust on Him. 

 

Looking  at  the  above  discussion,  it  is  clear  that  the  motive  of  consumption  effectuates  the  differences  between 



conventional  (conventional)  and  Islamic  consumption  theory.  At  the  operational  level,  we  can  see  some  similarities 

between both of them, but not at the philosophical level. For example, one of the human physiological needs is hunger. 

Everybody needs food regardless his religion. However, a Muslim is restricted to only lawful (halal) things and cannot 

eat anything that is forbidden by Islam. In this regard, Allah says: ‖And We said: O Adam, dwell thou and thy wife in 



this  garden,  and  eat  freely  thereof,  both  of  you,  whatever  you  may  wish;  but  do  not  approach  this  one  tree,  lest  you 

become wrongdoers.‖ (Al-Baqarah, 2:35)

 

The above verse has clearly shown that the consumption crisis has started over the years since a period of Adam and 



Eve  (existence  of  the  first  human  beings)  (Muhammad  Syukri  Salleh,  2003).  This  has  been  interpreted  by  Muslim 

scholars  as  the  first  signal  on  how  to  conduct  an  ideal  consumption  in  line  with  the  Islamic  teachings.  Besides,  the 



Quran clarifies the importance of His consent (mardhatillah) as a real motive in any activities, for example, in Surah 

al-Lail  (92),  verse  1-21,  Allah  explains  that  only  truly  righteous  act  in  order  to  obtain  His  blessings  will  bring 

blissfulness in the life after death (al-akhirat).  

 

4.0 Conclusion 

 

On  the  basis  of  the  above  discussion,  it  is  clear  that  any  consumer  behavior  theory  aspires  towards  granting 



comprehensive  views  to  marketers,  policy  makers  and  consumers.  The  Islamic  consumer  behavior  theory,  however 

offers a consistent and all-inclusive explanation of creation, reality, universe life and human experience. It displays the 

positive values such as diligence, thrift, moderation and balance between this world and the Hereafter. Moreover, the 

role of a Muslim consumer should reflect not only his personal preferences but also concerns for others. In the context 

of utility maximization, Islam recognizes the material and spiritual needs that should go hand in hand in harmony, but 

the  spiritual  factor  should  lead  the  other.  It  presents  the  necessary  knowledge  and  guidance  with  regard  to 

responsibilities of man in the world. It also explains the relation of man to other world of seen and unseen as well as 

promotes  commitment  and  responsibility  among  people  and  make  them  conscious  of  their  duty  towards  themselves 

and their societies.  

 

References 

 

Ahmad  Azrin  Adnan  &  Wan  Yusof  Wan  Chik  (2008).  Bank  Selection  Determinants  From  Islamic  Perspective:  A  Preliminary 

Review,  paper  presented  at  Seminar  on  Islam  Entrepreneurship  and  Consumerism  II  organised  by  Universiti  Malaya,  15 

October 2008. 

Al-Attas, S.M.N. (1994). The Degrees of Existence, Kuala Lumpur: ISTAC, 1-58. 

Alderson, W. (1957). Marketing Behavior and Executive Action, Homewood, IL: Richard D. Irwin. 

Anup Shah (2008). “Consumption and Consumerism” in Anup Shah, Consumption and Consumerism, GlobalIssues.org, access 

date 4 November 2008. 




International Journal of Business and Social Science                      Vol. 2 No. 21 [Special Issue – November 2011]

 

165 



 

Arthur, R.T. & Irving, J.D. (1992). Total Quality Management: Three Steps to Continuous Improvement, Reading, Massachusetts: 

Addison-Wesley. 

Bettman, J.R. (1979). An Information Processing Theory of Consumer Choice, Reading, MA: Addison-Wesley. 

Bettman,  J.R.,  Luce,  M.F.,  &  Payne,  J.W.  (1998).  Constructive  Consumer  Choice  Processes.  Journal  of  Consumer  Research

25(12): 187-217. 

Campbell,  M.C.  (1995).  When  Attention-Getting  Advertising  Tactics  Elicit  Consumer  Inferences  of  Manipulative  Intent:  The 

Importance of Balancing Benefits and Investments. Journal of Consumer Psychology, 4(3), 225-254.

  

Chisnall, P.M. (1995). Consumer Behavior, England: McGraw-Hill. 



Faiers,  A.,  Cook,  M.  &  Neame,  C.  (2007).  Towards  a  Contemporary  Approach  for  Understanding  Consumer  Behaviour  in  the 

Context of Domestic Energy Use. Journal of Energy Policy, 35, 4381-4390. 

Fazlur Rahman (1991). Doktrin Ekonomi Islam (Jilid 2) Zaharah Salleh, terjemahan. Kuala Lumpur: Dewan Bahasa dan Pustaka. 

Fournier, S. (1994). A Consumer-brand Relationship Framework for Strategic Brand Management. PhD Dissertation, University 

of Florida. 

Hamza  Salim  Lutfi  Khraim  (2000).  The  Effect  of  Religiosity,  Socioeconomic  Status  and  Ethnic  Intensity  On  The  Malay 



Consumers' Purchasing Decisions. Unpublished Degree of Doctor Philosophy, Universiti Sains Malaysia. 

Hawkins,  D.I.,  Kenneth,  A.C.  &  Roger,  J.B.  (1980).  Consumer  Behavior:  Implications  for  Marketing  Strategy,  Texas:  Business 

Publications, Inc. 

Huffman, C., Ratneshwar, S. & Mick, D.G. (2000). Consumer Goal Structures and Goal Determination Processes: An Integrative 

Framework,  in  Ratneshwar,  S.,  Mick  D.G.  &  Huffman,  C.  (Eds.),  The  Why  Consumption:  Contemporary  Perspectives  on 

Consumer Motives, Goals and Desires (9-35), London: Routledge.   

Kahf, M. (1981). A Contribution to the Theory of Consumer Behavior in An Islamic Society. In Khurshid Ahmad (Ed.), Studies in 



Islamic Economics (pp. 29-54). Leicester: The Islamic Foundation. 

Kahf, M. (t.t). ”The Demand Side or Consumer Behavior: Islamic Perspective” in monzer.kahf.com/articles/english/demand side 

or consumer behavior.pdf, access date 4 August 2011.  

Kamakura,  W.  &  Novak,  T.P.  (1992).  Value-system  Segmentation:  Exploring  the  Meaning  of  LOV.  Journal  of  Consumer 



Research, 19(6): 119-132. 

Khan, M.F. (1992). Macro Consumption Function in an Islamic Framework. Journal of Res. Islamic Economics, 2(2): 1-24.  

Kleine, III, R.E., Kleine, S.S. & Kernan, J.B. (1993). Mundane Consumption and the Self: A Social-identity Perspective. Journal 

of Consumer Psychology, 2(3): 209-235. 

Lutz, R.J. (1977). An Experimental Investigation of Causal Relations Among Cognitions, Affect and Behavioral Intention. Journal 



of Consumer Research, 3(3): 197-208. 

Imam Mohamed Baianonie (1997). ”Ibadah in Islam” in slam/org/khutub/ibadah_in_Islam.htm, access date 10 September 2011. 

Mannan, M.A. (1970). Islamic Economic: Theory and Practice. Lahore: Sh. Muhammad Ashraf. 

Markus, H. & Ruvolo, A. (1989). “Possible Selves: Personalized Representations of Goals” in L.A. Pervin (ed.) Goal Concepts in 



Personality and Social Psychology, Hillsdale, New Jersey: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates: 211-242. 

Mick, D.G. & Buhl, C. (1992). A Meaning-based Model of Advertising Experiences. Journal of Consumer Research, 19(12): 317-

338. 

Mohd Sabri Abdul Ghafar (2007). ‟Kualiti Dari Perspektif Islam‟. Paper presented at Sambutan Hari Kualiti Universiti Teknologi 



MARA Terengganu, 31 December 2007. 

Mowen, J.C. (1993). Consumer Behavior, New Jersey: Prentice Hall.  

Muhammad Asad (1980). The Translation of the Holy Quran, Gibraltar: Dar Al-Andalus. 

Muhammad Syukri Salleh (2003). 7 Prinsip Pembangunan Berteraskan Islam. Kuala Lumpur: Zebra Editions Sdn. Bhd. dan Pulau 

Pinang: Projek Pengurusan Pembangunan Islam, Pusat Pengajian Sains Kemasyarakatan, Universiti Sains Malaysia. 

Nik Mustapha Nik Hassan (1996). Consumer Behavior Theory from Islamic Perspective. IKIM Journal, 4(1): 49-62. 

Ratneshwar, S., Mick, D.G. & Huffman, C (2000). Introduction: The „Why‟ of Consumption, in Ratneshwar, S., Mick D.G. & 

Huffman,  C.  (Eds.),  The  Why  Consumption:  Contemporary  Perspectives  on  Consumer  Motives,  Goals  and  Desires  (9-35), 

London: Routledge.   

Sarimah Hanim Aman Shah (2005). Ekonomi dari Perspektif Islam. Selangor: Penerbit Fajar Bakti Sdn. Bhd. 

Schiffman, L.G. & Kanuk, L. L. (2004). Consumer Behavior. New Jersey: Prentice Hall. 

Siddiqi, M.N. (1979). The Economic Enterprise in Islam, Lahore: Islamic Publication. 

Siddiqi, M.N. (1981). Muslim Economic Thinking, Leicester: The Islamic Foundation. 

Solomon, M. R. (2002). Consumer Behavior, New Jersey: Prentice Hall. 

Solomon, M. R. (2009). Consumer Behavior, New Jersey: Prentice Hall.  

Sumner, S. (2011, January) How does inequality matter? The Economist, in www.economist. com, access date 10 September 2011. 

Walters, C. G. (1974). Consumer Behavior: Theory and Practice, Homewood, IL: Richard D. Irwin. 

Weber, M. (1958). The Protestant Ethic and The Spirit of Capitalism, New York: Charles Scribner‟s Son. 

Yusuf Al-Qaradhawi (1998). Peranan Nilai dan Akhlak dalam Ekonomi Islam (Mufti Labib & Arsil Ibrahim, Terjemahan). Kuala 

Lumpur: Angkatan Belia Islam Malaysia. 




Yüklə 171,53 Kb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©genderi.org 2023
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə