Francis W. Aston Nobel Lecture



Yüklə 251,25 Kb.
Pdf görüntüsü
tarix28.07.2018
ölçüsü251,25 Kb.
#59349


F

RANCIS 


W.  A

STON


Mass  spectra  and  isotopes

Nobel  Lecture,  December  12,  1922

Dalton’s  statement  of  the  Atomic  Theory,  which  has  been  of  such  incalcu-

lable  value  in  the  development  of  chemistry,  contained  the  postulate  that

"atoms  of  the  same  element  are  similar  to  one  another,  and  equal  in  weight".

The second part of this postulate cannot, in general, be tested by chemical

methods,  for  numerical  ratios  are  only  to  be  obtained  in  such  methods  by

the use of quantities of the element containing countless myriads of atoms.

At the same time it is somewhat surprising, when we consider the complete

absence of positive evidence in its support, that no theoretical doubts were

publicly expressed until late in the nineteenth century.

There  are  two  methods  by  which  the  postulate  can  be  tested  experi-

mentally,  either  by  comparing  the  weights  of  the  individual  atoms,  or  al-

ternatively  by  demonstrating  that  samples  of  an  element  can  exist  which

though  chemically  identical  yet  have  different  atomic  weights.  The  latter

method, by which the existence of isotopes was first proved, has been fully

dealt  with  in  the  previous  lecture  by  Professor  Soddy.  The  more  direct

method,  with  which  this  lecture  is  concerned,  can  be  applied  by  means  of

the analysis of positive rays.

The  condition  for  the  development  of  these  rays  is  briefly  ionization  at

low pressure in a strong electric field. Ionization, which may be due to col-

lisions or radiation, means in its simplest case the detachment of one electron

from a neutral atom. The two resulting fragments carry charges of electricity

of  equal  quantity  but  of  opposite  sign.  The  negatively  charged  one  is  the

electron, the atomic unit of negative electricity itself, and is the same what-

ever  the  atom  ionized.  It  is  extremely  light  and  therefore  in  the  strong  electric

field  rapidly  attains  a  high  velocity  and  becomes  a  cathode  ray.  The  re-

maining fragment is clearly dependent on the nature of the atom ionized.

It is immensely more massive than the electron, for the mass of the lightest

atom, that of hydrogen, is about 1,850 times that of the electron, and so will

attain a much lower velocity under the action of the electric field. However,

if  the  field  is  strong  and  the  pressure  so  low  that  it  does  not  collide  with  other

atoms  too  frequently,  it  will  ultimately  attain  a  high  speed  in  a  direction




1 9 2 2   F .   W . A S T O N

opposite  to  that  of  the  detached  electron,  and  become  a  "positive  ray".  The

simplest  form  of  positive  ray  is  therefore  an  atom  of  matter  carrying  a

positive charge and endowed, as a result of falling through a high potential,

with sufficient energy to make its presence detectable. Positive rays can be

formed from molecules as well as atoms, so that it will at once be seen that

any  measurement  of  their  mass  will  give  us  direct  information  as  to  the

masses  of  atoms  of  elements  and  molecules  of  compounds,  and  that  this

information will refer to the atoms or molecules individually, not, as in chem-

istry,  to  the  mean  of  an  immense  aggregate.  It  is  on  this  account  that  the

accurate analysis of positive rays is of such importance.

In the parabola  method of analysis devised by Sir J. J. Thomson, the rays

generated by means of an electric discharge, after reaching the surface of the

cathode,  enter  a  long  and  very  fine  metal  tube.  By  this  means  a  narrow

beam  of  rays  is  produced  which  is  subjected  to  deflection  by  electric  and

magnetic fields, and finally falls upon a screen of fluorescent material or a

photographic plate. The fields are arranged so that the two deflections are

at right angles to each other. If we call the displacement on the plate due to

the electric field x and that due to the magnetic field y for any particle, (x, y)

will  be  the  rectangular  coordinates  of  the  point  where  it  strikes  the  plate.

Simple dynamics show that if the angle of deflection is small, for a particle

of  mass  m,  charge  e  and  velocity 

V

the  electric  deflection  k(Xe/mv

2

)

and the magnetic deflection y = k’ He/mv) where X and are the  magnetic

and  electric  fields,  and  and  k’ constants  depending  solely  on  the  dimensions

and form of the apparatus. Hence if both fields are on together, the locus

of  impact  of  all  particles  of  the  same  e/m  but  varying  velocity  will  be  a

parabola. Since e must be the electronic charge, or a simple multiple of it,

measurement of the relative positions of the parabolas on the plate enables

us to calculate the relative masses of the particles producing them, that is,

the masses of the individual atoms. The fact that the streaks were definite,

sharp parabolas, and not mere blurs, constituted the first direct proof that

atoms of the same element were, even approximately, of equal mass.

Many  gases  were  examined  by  this  method  and  some  remarkable  com-

pounds,  such  as  H

2

, discovered  by  its  means.  When  in  1912  neon  was  in-



troduced into the discharge tube, it was observed to exhibit an interesting

peculiarity.  This  was  that  whereas  all  elements  previously  examined  gave

single,  or  apparently  single,  parabolas,  that  given  by  neon  was  definitely

double.  The  brighter  curve  corresponded  roughly  to  an  atomic  weight  of

20,  the  fainter  companion  to  one  of  22,  the  atomic  weight  of  neon  being



M A S S   S P E C T R A   A N D   I S O T O P E S

9

20.20. In consequence of reasoning adduced from the characteristics of the



line 22, Sir J. J. Thomson was of the opinion that it could not be attributed

to any compound, and that therefore it represented a hitherto unknown ele-

mentary  constituent  of  neon.  There  was  no  room  for  such  an  element  in

the Periodic Table; but the suggestion that atoms of different weight could

exist  having  identical  chemical  properties  had  just  been  promulgated,  and

the facts could be explained very well by the supposition that neon was a

mixture of two such bodies. I therefore undertook to investigate this point

as  fully  as  possible.

The first line of attack was an attempt at separation by fractional distilla-

tion over charcoal cooled with liquid air, but even after many thousands of

operations the result was entirely negative. The density of the fractions was

determined  by  means  of  a  special  quartz  microbalance  and  was  found  to

agree in every case with the accepted atomic weight of 20.20 to an accuracy

of  I  in  1000.

The  second  method  I  employed  was  that  of  fractional  diffusion  through

pipeclay,  which  after  months  of  arduous  work  gave  a  small  but  definite

positive indication of separation. A difference of about 0.7 per cent between

the densities of the heaviest and lightest fractions was obtained. If  is the

initial and v, the residual volume of gas, Rayleigh’s theory of diffusion gives

an  enrichment  of  approximately  (V/v)



I/21 

in  respect  to  the  heavier  con-

stituent in the residue in the case of neon. This is the result of a single opera-

tion,  and  the  effective  ratio  V/



can  be  increased  indefinitely  by  repeated

operations-in  these  experiments  it  amounted  to  several  thousand-  but

from the nature of the work cannot be stated exactly. If, to be perfectly safe,

we take V/

as  between  500  and  10,000,  the  theoretical  increase  in  density

of  the  heaviest  fraction  over  normal  should  lie  between  0.34  and  0.55  per

cent.  It  was  actually  0.4,  quite  a  reasonable  figure  considering  the  inefficiency

of the method. The decrease in density in the lightest fraction was rather less

owing to the loss of a portion of the gas during the experiment. When the

war interrupted the research, it might be said that several independent lines

of reasoning pointed to the conclusion that neon was a mixture of isotopes,

but none of these could be said to carry absolute conviction.

By the time the work was resumed in 1919 the existence of isotopes among

the products of radioactivity had been put beyond all reasonable doubt by

the work on the atomic weight of lead and was accepted generally. This fact

automatically  increased  both  the  value  of  the  evidence  of  the  complex  nature

of  neon  and  the  urgency  of  its  definite  confirmation.  It  was  realized  that




10 

      1922  F.W.ASTON

separation  could  only  be  very  partial  at  the  best,  and  that  the  most  satis-

factory proof would be afforded by measurements of atomic weight by the

method  of  positive  rays.  These  would  have  to  be  so  accurate  as  to  prove

beyond dispute that the accepted atomic weight lay between the real atomic

weights of the constituents, but corresponded with neither of them.

The parabola method was not capable of this, for the measurements ob-

tained by means of the best apparatus so far constructed were only reliable

to about one per cent. I therefore started to examine systematically all pos-

sible alternative methods, particularly those in which the fine circular tube

could be replaced by a pair of parallel slits. The reason for this is that the

intensity  of  the  beam  of  rays  will  only  be  reduced  in  proportion  to  the

square of the breadth of the slits, whereas for the circular tube the reduction

is proportional to the fourth power of its breadth.

It  is  clearly  only  possible  to  use  slits  satisfactorily  if  the  electric  and  magnet-

ic  deflections  are  both  in  the  same  plane  at  right  angles  to  the  slits,  and  during

a  mathematical  investigation  originally  started  to  determine  the  most  fa-

vourable positions of the slits, fields, and plate, I was fortunate enough to

hit on the focussing principle used in the mass spectrograph. A diagram of

this  apparatus  is  given  in  Fig. 

I.

  The  exact  mathematical  analysis  of  the



principle  has  now  been  worked  out,  but  it  will  be  enough  to  give  the  ap-

proximate  theory  here.

The rays after arriving at the cathode face pass through two very narrow

parallel  slits  of  special  construction  S

1

S

2



,  and  the  resulting  thin  ribbon  is

spread  out  into  an  electric  spectrum  by  means  of  the  parallel  plates  P

1

P

2



.

Fig.I.  Diagram  of  mass  spectrograph.




M A S S   S P E C T R A   A N D   I S O T O P E S

I I


After emerging from the electric field the rays may be taken, to a first order

of approximation, as radiating from a virtual source Z half-way through

the field on the line S

1

S



2

. A group of these rays is now selected by means

of the diaphragm D, and allowed to pass between the parallel poles of a

magnet. For simplicity the poles are taken as circular, the field between them

uniform and of such sign as to bend the rays in the opposite direction to the

foregoing electric field.

If 

θ and ϕ be the angles (taken algebraically) through which the selected



beam of rays is bent by passing through fields of strength X and H, then

and


(1)

(2)


where I, are the lengths of the paths of the rays in the fields. Eq. (

I

) is



only true for small angles, but exact enough for practice. It follows that over

the small range of 

θ selected by the diaphragm, θ v

and 


 

are constant for

all rays of given e/m, therefore

o, and 


 o,

so that


when the velocity varies in a group of rays of given e/m.  This equation

appears correct within practical limits for large circular pole-pieces.

Referred to axes OX, OY the focus is at cos 

 Y 


sin 

 or


r, 

 so that to a first-order approximation, whatever the fields, so long

as the position of the diaphragm is fixed, the foci will all lie on the straight

line ZF drawn through Z parallel to OX. For purposes of construction, G

the image of Z in OY is a convenient reference point, 

ϕ, being here equal to

4  

'. 

It is clear that a photographic plate, indicated by the thick line, will be

in fair focus for values of e/m over a range large enough for accurate com-

parison of masses.

Since it is a close analogue of the ordinary spectrograph and gives a

<> depending upon mass alone, the instrument is called a <

spectrographs and the spectrum it produces a <>.

Fig. 2 shows a number of typical mass spectra obtained by this means.

The numbers above the lines indicate the masses they correspond to, on the




12

    1922  F.  W.ASTON

scale  O  =  16.  It  will  be  noticed  that  the  displacement  to  the  right  with

increasing mass is roughly linear. The measurements of mass made are not

absolute, but relative to lines which correspond to known masses. Such lines

due to hydrogen, carbon, oxygen, and their compounds are generally pres-

ent as impurities or purposely added, for pure gases are not suitable for the

smooth  working  of  the  discharge  tube.  The  two  principal  groups  of  these

reference  lines  are  the  C

group  due  to  C  (12),  CH  (13),  CH



(14),  CH

3

(15),  CH



or  O(16), and the C

group (24 to 30) containing the very strong



line  C

2

H



4

or  CO  (28).  These  groups  will  be  seen  in  several  of  the  spectra

reproduced,  and  they  give,  with  the  CO,  line  (44),  a  very  good  scale  of

reference.

It must be remembered that the ratio of mass to charge is the real quantity

measured by the position of the lines. Many of the particles are capable of

carrying more than one charge. A particle carrying two charges will appear

as  having  half  its  real  mass,  one  carrying  three  charges  as  if  its  mass  was  one-

third, and so on: Lines due to these are called lines of the second and third

order. Lines of high order are particularly valuable in extending our scale




M A S S   S P E C T R A   A N D   I S O T O P E S

13

of reference. When neon was introduced into the apparatus, four new lines



made their appearance at 10, 11, 20, and 22. The first pair are second-order

lines and are fainter than the other two. All four are well placed for direct

comparison with the standard lines, and a series of consistent measurements

showed that to within about one part in a thousand the atomic weights of

the isotopes composing neon are 20 and 22 respectively. Ten per cent of the

latter would bring the mean atomic weight to the accepted value of 20.20,

and the relative intensity of the lines agrees well with this proportion. The

isotopic constitution of neon was therefore settled beyond all doubt.

Spectrum I on the plate shows the first-order lines of neon and some of

the reference lines with which they were compared.

The element chlorine was naturally the next to be analysed, and the ex-

planation  of  its  fractional  atomic  weight  was  obvious  from  the  first  plate

taken. Its mass spectrum is characterized by four strong first-order lines at

35, 36, 37, 38. There is no sign whatever of any line at 35.46. The simplest

explanation of the group is to suppose that the lines 35 and 37 are due to the

isotopic chlorines, and lines 36 and 38 to their corresponding hydrochloric

acids.  The  elementary  nature  of  lines  35  and  37  is  also  indicated  by  the

second-order lines at 17.5, 18.5, and also, when phosgene was used, by the

appearance  of  lines  at  63,  65,  due  to  CO

35

CI  and  CO



37

CI.


Later it was found possible to obtain the spectrum of negatively charged

rays. These rays are formed by a normal positively charged ray picking up

two electrons. On the negative spectrum of chlorine only two lines, 35 and

37, can be seen, so that the lines at 36 and 38 cannot be due to isotopes of

the element. These results, taken with many others which cannot be stated

here in detail, show that chlorine is a complex element, and that its isotopes

are of atomic weight 35 and 37. Spectra II, III, and IV show the results with

chlorine taken with different magnetic field strengths.

The mass spectrum of argon shows an exceedingly bright line at 40, with

second-order line at 20, and third-order line at 135. The last is particularly

well  placed  between  known  reference  lines,  and  its  measurement  showed

that  the  triply  charged  atom  causing  it,  had  a  mass  40  very  exactly.  Now

the  accepted  atomic  weight  of  argon  is  less  than  40,  so  the  presence  of  a

lighter isotope was suggested. This was found at 36, and has now been fully

substantiated; its presence to the extent of about 3 per cent is sufficient to

account  for  the  mean  atomic  weight  obtained  by  density  determinations.

The  elements  hydrogen  and  helium  present  peculiar  difficulties,  since  their

lines are so far removed from the ordinary reference scale, but, as the lines




14

      1 9 2 2   F . W . A S T O N

were  expected  to  approximate  to  the  terms  of  the  geometrical  progression

1, 2, 4, 8, etc., the higher terms of which are known, a special method was

adopted by which a two-to-one relation could be tested with some exactness.

Two  sets  of  accumulators  were  selected,  each  giving  very  nearly  the  same

potential  of  about  250  volts.  The  potentials  were  then  made  exactly  equal

by means of a subsidiary cell and a current-divider, the equality being tested

to well within 1,000 by means of a null instrument. If exposures are made

with such potentials applied to the electric plates first in parallel and then

in series, the magnetic field being kept constant, all masses having an exact

two-to-one  relation  will  be  brought  into  coincidence  on  the  plate.  Such

coincidences  cannot  be  detected  on  the  same  spectrum  photographically;

but if we first add and then subtract a small potential from one of the large

potentials,  two  lines  will  be  obtained  which  closely  bracket  the  third.  To

take an actual instance - using a gas containing hydrogen and helium, with

a constant current in the magnet of 0.2 ampere, three exposures were made

with  electric  fields  of  250,  500  +  12,  and  500  -  12  volts,  respectively.  The

hydrogen  molecule  line  was  found  symmetrically  bracketed  by  a  pair  of

atomic  lines  (Spectrum  VII,  a  and  c),  showing  within  experimental  error

that the mass of the molecule is exactly double the mass of the atom. When

after  a  suitable  increase  of  the  magnetic  field  the  same  procedure  was  applied

to  the  helium  line  and  that  of  the  hydrogen  molecule,  the  bracket  was  no

longer symmetrical ( Spectrum VII, b), nor was it when the hydrogen mol-

ecule  was  bracketed  by  two  helium  lines  (d).  Both  results  show  in  an  un-

mistakable manner that the mass of He is less than twice that of H

2

. In the


same  way  He  was  compared  with  O++  and  H

3

.  The  values  obtained  by  its



use  can  be  checked  in  the  ordinary  way  by  comparing  He  with  C++  and

H



with  He,  these  pairs  being  close  enough  together  for  the  purpose.  The

following  table  gives  the  range  of  values  obtained  from  the  most  reliable

plates:



M A S S   S P E C T R A   A N D   I S O T O P E S

15

From these figures it is safe to conclude that hydrogen is a simple element

and that its atomic weight, determined with such consistency and accuracy

by chemical methods, is the true mass of its atom.

The  heavy  inert  gases  give  interesting  and  complicated  results.  Krypton

is characterized by a remarkable group of five strong lines at 80, 82, 83, 84,

86, and a faint sixth at 78. This cluster of isotopes is beautifully reproduced

with the same relative values of intensity in the second, and fainter still in

the  third  order.  These  multiply-charged  clusters  give  most  reliable  values

of  mass,  as  the  second  order  can  be  compared  with  A  (40)  and  the  third

with  CO  or  N

(28) with  the  highest  accuracy.  It  will  be  noted  that  one



member of each group is obliterated by the reference line, but not the same

one. The singly and doubly charged krypton clusters can be seen to the right

and left of SpectrumVIII. It will be noticed that krypton is the first element

examined which shows unmistakable isotopes differing by one unit only.

Xenon  is  even  more  complex.  It  consists  of  five  strong  components  129,

131,  132,  134,  136  and  two  fainter  ones  128,  130;  in  addition  recent  work

has  revealed  two  extremely  faint  probable  ones  124,  126,  making  nine  in

all.


Mercury was early recognized to be a mixture of isotopes. Its components

are however too close to be perfectly resolved by the present apparatus. Its

first, second, third, and higher order lines appear as a series of characteristic

groups  around  positions  corresponding  to  masses  200,  100, 

 etc. Some

of these will be easily distinguished on the spectra reproduced in the plate.

In addition to those mentioned above, the elements nitrogen, boron, fluo-

rine,  silicon,  bromine,  sulphur,  phosphorus,  iodine,  nickel,  tin,  iron,  sele-

nium,  aluminium,  and  antimony  have  been  analysed  by  means  of  the

spectrograph,  using  the  discharge-tube  method  of  producing  the  positive

rays. By the analysis of anode rays the constitution of the alkali metals lith-

ium, sodium, potassium, rubidium, and caesium has been determined. The

following table gives the collected results and also includes magnesium, cal-

cium, and zinc, whose complex constitution has been determined by Demp-

ster,  using  his  own  method  of  analysis,  and  beryllium,  which  has  been

investigated  by  G.  P.  Thomson,  using  the  parabola  method.

By far the most important result of these measurements is that, with the

exception  of  hydrogen,  the  weights  of  the  atoms  of  all  the  elements  meas-

ured, and therefore almost certainly of all elements, are whole numbers to

the  accuracy  of  experiment,  namely,  about  one  part  in  a  thousand.  Of  course,

the  error  expressed  in  fractions  of  a  unit  increases  with  the  weight  measured,



16 

    1 9 2 2   F . W . A S T O N

Table of elements and isotopes.

Element

Atomic 

Atomic

number 

weight

Minimum

number  of

isotopes

Masses of isotopes in order of intensity

1



He 

2

Li



3

Be 


4

B

5



6

N



7

8



F

9

Ne 



10

Na 


11

Mg

12



Al

13

Si 



14

P

15



16

Cl 



17

18



K

19

Ca 



20

Fe 


26

Ni 


28

Zn

30



As

33

Se



34

Br

35



Kr

36

Rb



37

Sn

50



Sb

51

I



53

X

54



Cs

55

132.81



Hg

80 


200.6

1.008


3.99

6.94


9.1

10.9


12.00

14.01


16.00

19.00


20.20

23.00


24.32

26.96


28.3

31.04


32.06

35.46


39.88

39.10


40.07

55.84


58.68

65.37


74.96

79.2


79.92

82.92


85.45

118.7


121.77

126.92


130.2

1

1



2

1

2



1

1

1



1

2

1



3

1

2



1

1

2



2

2

( 1 )



(4)

1

6



2

6

7(8)



2

I

7(9)



1.008

4

7, 6



9

11, 10


12

14

16



19

20,22


23

24,25,26


27

28,29,(30)

31

32

35,37



40,36

39,41


40, 44

56,(54)?


58,60

64,66,68,70

75

80,78,76,82,77,74



79,81

84,86,82,83,80,78

85,87

120,118,116,124,119,117,122,(121)



121, 123

127


129,132,131,134,136,128,130,(126),

(124)


133

(197-200),202,204

Numbers in brackets are provisional only.



M A S S   S P E C T R A   A N D   I S O T O P E S

17

but with the lighter elements the divergence from the whole number rule is



extremely  small.

This  enables  the  most  sweeping  simplifications  to  be  made  in  our  ideas

of  mass.  The  original  hypothesis  of  Prout,  put  forward  in  1815,  that  all

atoms  were  themselves  built  of  atoms  of  protyle,  a  hypothetical  element

which  he  tried  to  identify  with  hydrogen,  is  now  reestablished,  with  the

modification that the primordial atoms are of two kinds: protons and elec-

trons, the atoms of positive and negative electricity.

The  Rutherford-Bohr  atom  consists  essentially  of  a  positively  charged

central nucleus around which revolve planetary electrons at distances great

compared with the dimensions of the nucleus itself.

As has been stated, the chemical properties of an element depend solely

on its atomic number, which is the charge on its nucleus expressed in terms

of  the  unit  charge,  e.  A  neutral  atom  of  an  element  of  atomic  number  N

has a nucleus consisting of K + N protons and K electrons, and around this

nucleus revolve N electrons. The weight of an electron on the scale we are

using  is  0.0005,  so  that  it  may  be  neglected.  The  weight  of  this  atom  will

therefore  be  K  +  N,  so  that  if  no  restrictions  are  placed  on  the  value  of  K

any number of isotopes are possible.

A  statistical  study  of  the  results  given  above  shows  that  the  natural

restrictions can be stated in the form of rules as follows:



In the nucleus  of an atom there is never less than one electron to every two protons.

There  is  no  known  exception  to  this  law.  It  is  the  expresssion  of  the  fact

that if an element has an atomic number N the atomic weight of its lightest

isotope cannot be less than 



2

N. Worded as above, the ambiguity in the case

of  hydrogen  is  avoided.  True  atomic  weights  corresponding  exactly  to 



2

N

are  known  in  the  majority  of  the  lighter  elements  up  to 

36

A.  Among  the



heavier  elements  the  difference  between  the  weight  of  the  lightest  isotope

and the value 



2

tends  to  increase  with  the  atomic  weight;  in  the  cases  of

mercury it amounts to 37 units. The corresponding divergence of the mean

atomic  weights  from  the  value 

2

has of course been noticed from the be-

ginning of the idea of atomic number.



The number of isotopes of an element and their range of atomic weight appear

to  have  definite  limits  -  Since  the  atomic  number  only  depends  on  the  net

positive  charge  in  the  nucleus,  there  is  no  arithmetical  reason  why  an  element

should not have any number of isotopes.

So far the largest number appears to be 9 in the case of xenon, which also

shows  the  maximum  difference  between  its  lightest  and  heaviest  isotopes,



18

      1922  F.  W.ASTON

12  units.  The  greatest  proportional  difference  calculated  on  the  lighter  weight

is recorded in the case of lithium, where it amounts to one-sixth. It is about

one-tenth in the cases of boron, neon, argon, selenium, krypton, and xenon.

No  element  of  odd  atomic  number  has  more  than  two  isotopes.



The number of electrons in the nucleus tends to be even - This  rule  expresses

the fact that in the majority of cases even atomic number is associated with

even atomic weight, and odd with odd. If we consider the three groups of

elements, the halogens, the inert gases and the alkali metals, this tendency is

very  strongly  marked.  Of  the  halogens  -  odd  atomic  numbers  -  all  6  (+

1 ?) atomic weights are odd. Of the inert gases - even atomic numbers - 13

(+2?)  are  even  and  3  odd.  Of  the  alkali  metals  -  odd  atomic  numbers  -  7

are  odd  and  1 even.  In  the  cases  of  elements  of  other  groups  the  prepon-

derance,  though  not  so  large,  is  still  very  marked.  Beryllium  and  nitrogen

are  the  only  elements  yet  discovered  to  consist  entirely  of  atoms  whose

nuclei  contain  an  odd  number  of  electrons.

If we take the natural numbers 1 to 40, we find that those not represented

by  known  atomic  weights  are  2,  3,  5,  8,  13,  (17),  (18),  21,  (33),  34,  (38).

It  is  rather  remarkable  that  these  gaps,  with  the  exception  of  the  four  in

parentheses, are represented by a simple mathematical series of which any

term  is  the  sum  of  the  two  previous  terms.  In  consequence  of  the  whole-

number  rule  there  is  now  no  logical  difficulty  in  regarding  protons  and

electrons as the bricks out of which atoms have been constructed. An atom

of  atomic  weight  is  turned  into  one  of  atomic  weight  m + 1 by  the  addi-

tion of a proton plus an electron. If both enter the nucleus, the new element

will be an isotope of the old one, for the nuclear charge has not been altered.

On the other hand, if the proton alone enters the nucleus and the electron

remains outside, an element of next higher atomic number will be formed.

If  both  these  new  configurations  are  possible,  they  will  represent  elements

of  the  same  atomic  weight  but  with  different  chemical  properties.  Such

elements  are  called  "isobases".

It will be observed that the principal atomic species of argon and calcium

are isobases, each having a weight 40. In the same manner no less than four

seleniums form isobasic pairs with kryptons. In all such pairs known with

certainty  to  exist,  the  elements  concerned  have  even  atomic  numbers  and

even  atomic  weights,  also  one  member  of  each  pair  is  an  inert  gas.  The

whole-number  rule  is  not  to  be  supposed  as  mathematically  exact,  for  al-

though  the  atoms  of  all  elements  are  made  up  of  the  same  electrical  units

their masses will be affected slightly by the way in which these unit charges




M A S S   S P E C T R A   A N D   I S O T O P E S

19

are  put  together.  This  is  called  the  packing  effect,  and  some  recent  results



suggest that the difference caused by it may amount to two or three parts in

a  thousand  in  the  mass  relations  of  the  isotopes  of  tin  and  xenon.  The

packing  effect  may  be  clearly  expected  to  be  a  maximum  in  the  relation

between the masses of helium and hydrogen.

The case of the element hydrogen is unique; its atom appears to consist

of a single proton as nucleus with one planetary electron. It is the only atom

in which the nucleus is not composed of a number of protons and electrons

packed  exceedingly  close  together.  Theory  indicates  that  when  such  close

packing  takes  place  the  effective  mass  will  be  reduced,  so  that  when  four

protons are packed together with two electrons to form the helium nucleus

this  will  have  a  weight  rather  less  than  four  times  that  of  the  hydrogen

nucleus, which is actually the case. It has long been known that the chemical

atomic weight of hydrogen was greater than one-quarter of that of helium,

but so long as fractional weights were general there was no particular need

to  explain  this  fact,  nor  could  any  definite  conclusions  be  drawn  from  it.

The results obtained by means of the mass spectrograph remove all doubt

on  this  point,  and  no  matter  whether  the  explanation  is  to  be  ascribed  to

packing  or  not,  we  may  consider  it  absolutely  certain  that  if  hydrogen  is

transformed into helium a certain quantity of mass must be annihilated in

the process. The cosmical importance of this conclusion is profound and the

possibilities it opens for the future very remarkable, greater in fact than any

suggested before by science in the whole history of the human race.

We know from Einstein’s Theory of Relativity that mass and energy are

interchangeable and that in c.g.s. units a mass at  rest  may  be  expressed

as a quantity of energy mc

2

where c is the velocity of light. Even in the case

of the smallest mass this energy is enormous. The loss of mass when a single

helium  nucleus  is  formed  from  free  protons  and  electrons  amounts  in  energy

to  that  acquired  by  a  charge  e  falling  through  a  potential  of  nearly  thirty

million volts. If instead of considering single atoms we deal with quantities

of  matter  in  ordinary  experience,  the  figures  for  the  energy  become  pro-

digious.

Take the case of one gram-atom of hydrogen, that is to say the quantity

of  hydrogen  in  9 

C

.



C

.  of  water.  If  this  is  entirely  transformed  into  helium

the energy liberated will be

0.0077  x  9  x  10

20 

=  6.93  x  10



18 

e r g s



20

      1 9 2 2   F . W . A S T O N

Expressed  in  terms  of  heat,  this  is  1.66  x  10

11 


calories  or  in  terms  of  work

200,000  kilowatt  hours.  We  have  here  at  last  a  source  of  energy  sufficient

to  account  for  the  heat  of  the  sun.  In  this  connection  Eddington  remarks

that if only 10 per  cent  of  the  total  hydrogen  on  the  sun  were  transformed

into helium, enough energy would be liberated to maintain its present radia-

tion for a thousand million years.

Should  the  research  worker  of  the  future  discover  some  means  of  re-

leasing this energy in a form which could be employed, the human race will

have  at  its  command  powers  beyond  the  dreams  of  scientific  fiction;  but

the remote possibility must always be considered that the energy once lib-

erated will be completely uncontrollable and by its intense violence detonate

all neighbouring substances. In this event the whole of the hydrogen on the

earth might be transformed at once and the success of the experiment pub-

lished at large to the universe as a new star.




Yüklə 251,25 Kb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©genderi.org 2023
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə