Frederick Soddy, 1877-1956



Yüklə 2,72 Mb.
Pdf görüntüsü
səhifə1/6
tarix28.07.2018
ölçüsü2,72 Mb.
#59317
  1   2   3   4   5   6


Frederick Soddy, 1877-1956

Alexander Fleck

1957

, 203-216, published 1 November



3

1957 


Biogr. Mems Fell. R. Soc. 

Email alerting service

here


corner of the article or click 

this article - sign up in the box at the top right-hand 

Receive free email alerts when new articles cite

http://rsbm.royalsocietypublishing.org/subscriptions

, go to: 

Biogr. Mems Fell. R. Soc.

To subscribe to 

 on July 27, 2018

http://rsbm.royalsocietypublishing.org/

Downloaded from 

 on July 27, 2018

http://rsbm.royalsocietypublishing.org/

Downloaded from 




 on July 27, 2018

http://rsbm.royalsocietypublishing.org/

Downloaded from 



FREDERICK  SODDY

Born  Eastbourne  2  September  1877 

Died  Brighton  26  September  1956

F

r e d e r ic k

  S

o d d y

 

was  a  complex  personality  and  if we  are  to  arrive  at  any 

degree  of understanding  of its  aspects,  I  believe  we  have  to  give  more  than 

usual place  to  the background of his  early life.  It has been  my conception of 

his  life  that  there  was  really four  chapters  in it—

To  1900—his formative  years,

From  1900  to  1911—Montreal  and  the  disintegration  theory,

From  1912  to  1918—Glasgow  and  isotopes,

Onwards  from  1919—Oxford  and  his  social  outlook.

His 


F

o r m a t iv e

  Y

e a r s

Soddy’s father was  a relatively successful corn merchant who was  55 years 

old when Frederick was born,  the seventh  and last child.  His father retained 

the inherited family tradition of deep religious feeling, consistently and regu­

larly  shown  by  public  worship.  Soddy’s  grandfather  had  aspirations  to  be  a 

missionary to  the  South  Sea  Islanders  and had sailed for the Antipodes  only 

to  be  captured  by  a  French  privateer in  the  year  1798.  Calvinistic  sermons, 

to  which  he  was  compelled  to  listen,  made  a  deep  impression  on  Soddy’s 

memories of his boyhood.  These sermons were always  extreme in their views 

and  practically  always  contained  dire  threats  of what  might follow any  ten­

dency  to  leanings  towards  the  Catholic  Faith.  Soddy  disagreed  with  those 

views very deeply,  but for understanding him it should  be remembered  that 

he  was  brought  up  in  this  family  tradition  stemming  from  his  grandfather’s 

time and in his own case, from his childhood. An ‘evangel’  of some sort was a 

usual  and not  a  rare guest in  the  household.  And so  in  the  approach  he  was 

liable to make to things in general,  I have regarded his basic method of going 

hard  at  an  idea  without  regard  to  the  finer  feelings  of others,  as  being  to  a 

considerable  extent  derived  from  the  atmosphere  of family  Galvinistic  out­

look to which he was accustomed in his early years. Truth as it was conceived 

was  the  essential  thing.  The  method  of its  presentation,  even  at  the  expense 

of other people’s  feelings,  was  unimportant.

In his early education he was appreciative of the successful efforts of a lady 

teacher  who  eliminated  a  tendency  to  stammer,  and  then  it  was  at  East­

bourne  College  under  the  guidance  of a  science  master,  R.  E.  Hughes,  only 

recently  down  from  Jesus  College,  Oxford,  with  a  First  Class  Honours 

Degree,  that he showed interest in chemistry and  displayed  a science  type of

203

14

 on July 27, 2018



http://rsbm.royalsocietypublishing.org/

Downloaded from 




mentality  which  had  been  wholly  absent  from  the  family  in  either  of its 

previous  or present  members.

At  the  age  of 17  he  published  his  first  chemical  paper,  as  co-author  with 

Hughes,  following Bereton Baker on  the behaviour of dry ammonia  and dry 

carbon  dioxide.  The  description  is  short  and  is  published  in  the  Chemical 

News  of 1894  (1).*  By  this  time  he  had  made  the acquaintance of H.  C.  H. 

(later  Sir  Harold)  Carpenter,  F.R.S.  Because  of  his  relative  youth  and  a 

desire  to  obtain  the  Merton  College  Open  Science  Postmastership,  it  was 

decided that a year at Aberystwyth before going to  Oxford would be helpful 

and  by  an  unfortunate  difficulty  over  Latin,  this  year  was  extended  by  an 

additional  term.  In  the  meantime  he  had  won  the  1895  Postmastership.  By 

1896  he  was  in  Merton  College,  Oxford,  renewing  his  acquaintance  with 

Carpenter  and  was  in  contact  with J.  E.  Marsh,  later  F.R.S.,  with  whom 

Hughes  had  been  collaborating.

From  his  Oxford  days,  first  as  an  undergraduate  and  then  during  a  post­

graduate  year,  there  are  three  matters  worthy  of note.  He  was  active in  the 

Oxford  University Junior  Scientific  Society and  became  its  Chemical  Secre­

tary. In that Society’s Journal he published a thorough and, indeed for a piece 

of undergraduate  work,  a  very  remarkable  paper  on  the  life  and  work  of 

Victor Meyer.  The third matter to record is that he showed practical interest 

in organic chemistry during the year after graduating by working with Marsh 

on  a  suggested  structure  of camphor.

His normal academic undergraduate work came to an end in  1898 when he 

graduated First  Class in the Honours School of Natural Science.  Sir William 

Ramsay,  with  whom  he  was  later  to  collaborate  in  an  important  investiga­

tion,  was  his  external  examiner—that was his  first introduction  to  him.

His  own  record  of the  further  year  at  Oxford  after  graduation  is  that  he 

attempted  various  lines  of  research  which  did  not  yield  any  worthwhile 

results.  At  the  age  of  23  he  considered  himself equipped  to  apply  for  the 

Professorship  of Chemistry  then vacant  in  Toronto.  With  one  of his  charac­

teristic decisions he decided he would follow up his application by a personal 

visit.  His  Toronto  visit  was  fruitless  for  its  initial  objective,  but  he  then 

decided  to visit Montreal,  attracted,  I  believe,  by the high  reputation of the 

laboratory  equipment  available  at  McGill  University.  He  accepted  a junior 

demonstratorship  in  the  Chemistry  Department  at £100  per  annum,  but he 

was  made  economically  stable  by  the  generosity  of his  father.  This  was  in 

May  1900 and  he did not meet Rutherford until  September of that year.



M

o n t r e a l

 

a n d

 

t h e

 

d is in t e g r a t io n

 

t h e o r y

So  far  as  Soddy  is  concerned  there  are  no  publications  in  1901,  but  the 

joint  Rutherford  and  Soddy  papers  start  in  1902  and  are  essentially  con­

cerned with thorium,  thorium X and  thorium emanation.  The collaboration



*  The  numbers  in  parenthesis  refer  to  the numbered  items  in  the bibliography  at the  end of this 

memoir.

2 0 4 


Biographical  Memoirs

 on July 27, 2018

http://rsbm.royalsocietypublishing.org/

Downloaded from 





Yüklə 2,72 Mb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:
  1   2   3   4   5   6




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©genderi.org 2023
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə