Fritz Haber Nobel Lecture



Yüklə 118,87 Kb.
Pdf görüntüsü
tarix28.07.2018
ölçüsü118,87 Kb.
#59375


F

RITZ 


H

ABER


The synthesis of ammonia from its elements

Nobel Lecture, June 2, 

1920

The  Swedish  Academy  of  Sciences  has  seen  fit,  by  awarding  the  Nobel

Prize, to honour the method of producing ammonia from nitrogen and hy-

drogen. This outstanding distinction puts upon me the obligation of explain-

ing the position occupied by this reaction within the subject of chemistry as

a whole, and to outline the road which led to it.

We are concerned with a chemical phenomenon of the simplest possible

kind.  Gaseous  nitrogen  combines  with  gaseous  hydrogen  in  simple  quantita-

tive  proportions  to  produce  gaseous  ammonia.  The  three  substances  involved

have been well known to the chemist for over a hundred years. During the

second half of the last century each of them has been studied hundreds of

times in its behaviour under various conditions during a period in which a

flood of new chemical knowledge became available. If it has not been until

the present century that the production of ammonia from the elements has

been discovered, this is due to the fact that very special equipment must be

used  and  strict  conditions  must  be  adhered  to  if  one  is  to  succeed  in  obtaining

spontaneous combination of nitrogen and hydrogen on a substantial scale,

and  that  a  combination  of  experimental  success  with  thermodynamic  con-

siderations  was  needed.

It  was  particularly  significant  that  earlier  attempts  had  not  succeeded,  even

fleetingly, in achieving with absolute certainty a spontaneous union of nitro-

gen  and  hydrogen  to  form  ammonia.  This  gave  rise  to  the  prejudice  that  such

a production of ammonia was impossible, and in the course of time this en-

joyed considerable support in chemical circles. Such prejudice leads one to

expect  pitfalls  which,  far  more  than  clearly-defined  difficulties,  deter  one

from  becoming  too  deeply  involved  in  the  subject.

A  narrow  professional  interest  in  the  preparation  of  ammonia  from  the

elements  was  based  on  the  achievement  of  a  simple  result  by  means  of  special

equipment.  A  more  widespread  interest  was  due  to  the  fact  that  the  synthesis

of  ammonia  from  its  elements,  if  carried  out  on  a  large  scale,  would  be  a

useful, at present perhaps the most useful, way of satisfying important na-

tional economic needs. Such practical uses were not the principal purpose of




    A M M O N I A   S Y N T H E S I S   F R O M   E L E M E N T S

327


my  investigations.  I  was  never  in  doubt  that  my  laboratory  work  would

produce no more than a scientific confirmation of basic principles and a cri-

terion of experimental aids, and that much would need to be added to any

success  of  mine  to  ensure  economic  success  on  an  industrial  scale.  On  the

other hand I would hardly have concentrated so much on this problem had

I not been convinced of the economic necessity of chemical progress in this

field,  and  had  I  not  shared  to  the  full  Fichte’s  conviction  that  while  the  imme-

diate object of science lies in its own development, its ultimate aim must be

bound up in the moulding influence which it exerts at the right time upon

life in general and the whole human arrangement of things around us.

Since the middle of the last century it has become known that a supply of

nitrogen is a basic necessity for the development of food crops; it was also

recognized,  however,  that  plants  cannot  absorb  the  elementary  nitrogen

which is the main constituent of the atmosphere, but need the nitrogen to

be combined with oxygen in the form of nitrate in order to be able to assim-

ilate  it.  This  combination  with  oxygen  can  start  with  combination  with

hydrogen to form ammonia since ammonium nitrogen changes to saltpetre

nitrogen in the soil.

Under natural conditions the soil does not lose its fixed nitrogen. Green

plants use it to synthesize complicated substances without changing it into

elementary nitrogen. Animals and humans ingest it with the plants and re-

turn it to the soil in fixed form in their excretions and finally with their de-

ceased  remains.  Putrefaction  and  combustion  does  destroy  a  certain  amount  of

fixed  nitrogen,  but  Nature  makes  good  the  loss  when,  during  thunderstorms,

lightning  combines  nitrogen  and  oxygen  in  the  upper  layers  of  the  atmo-

sphere, which is then washed down by the rain. To this nitrogen-fixing ac-

tion  of  electrical  discharge  as  a  source  of  bound  nitrogen  is  added  the  activity

of soil bacteria, some of which live free while others are to be found settled

in the root nodules of many plants, converting free nitrogen into bound ni-

trogen.


Agricultural husbandry essentially maintains the balance of bound nitro-

gen. However, with the advent of the industrial age, the products of the soil

are carried off from where the crops are grown to far-off places where they

are consumed, with the result that the bound nitrogen is no longer returned

to the earth from which it was taken.

This has caused the world-wide economic necessity of supplying bound

nitrogen to the soil. This need is increased by national economic considera-

tions, which, with the denser population of industrialized countries, call for




328

    1 9 1 8   F . H A B E R

increased agricultural productivity at home, and it is yet further increased by

the fact that expanding industry requires fixed nitrogen for many of its own

chemical  purposes.  The  demand  for  nitrogen,  like  that  for  coal,  indicates  how

far removed our way of life has become from that of the people who ((them-

selves do fertilize the soil they cultivate)).

Agriculture, always the main consumer, is not satisfied with a supply of

nitrogen alone - potash and phosphates are equally indispensable - but the

world  possesses  far  fewer  natural  resources  for  meeting  nitrogen  require-

ments.  And  so,  naturally,  concern  over  nitrogen  supplies  has  become  the

first  of  the  great  obstacles  that  lie  along  the  highway  of  world  commerce

upon which we have been travelling in recent decades.

Our way of thinking, so used to interpreting historical events in the con-

text of man’s unchangeable nature, easily misleads us into overlooking the

enormous  turning-point  in  the  history  of  mankind  represented  by  the  last

hundred years. In earlier periods the need for energy was satisfied by men’s

physical labour and by the use of wind and sun, which are older than our-

selves and will outlive our life conditions. The past century has opened the

floodgates for the energy stored in coal, and has introduced ways of life in

industrialized countries in which the physical labour of men merely operates

a relay to release the hundred times more powerful energy of coal into the

lifestream of international commerce. Technical needs have arisen for which

we  only  too  easily  find  ourselves  unprepared  through  a  lack  of  adequate

scientific  development.  The  present  state  of  affairs  in  the  world,  with  the

after-effects of the War in Central Europe placing an overwhelming load on

our scientific work, makes this only too plain.

The need for opening up new sources of nitrogen became clearly apparent

at the turn of the century. Since the middle of the last century we had been

drawing upon the supply of saltpetre nitrogen which Nature had deposited

in the high-mountain deserts of Chile. By comparing the fast-rising require-

ments  with  the  calculated  extent  of  these  deposits  it  became  clear  that  to-

wards the middle of the present century a major emergency would be una-

voidable, unless the chemistry found a way out.

The  problem  was  not  a  new  one  to  the  chemists.  When  they  began  to

distil  coal  they  came  across  ammonia  among  the  distillation  products  and

this,  in  the  form  of  ammonium  sulphate,  found  application  in  agriculture.

While in 1870 ammonia was a tiresome by-product of the gas industry, by

1900 

it had become a very valued companion to combustible gases and the



coke industry was in full swing everywhere to adapt furnaces to its by-pro-


      A M M O N I A   S Y N T H E S I S   F R O M   E L E M E N T S

329


duction.  Its  origin  from  the  fixed  nitrogen  of  coal  was  understood;  an  im-

provement in its yield, which by the normal process was hardly more than

1/5  of  the  nitrogen  content  in  the  coal,  had  been  widely  studied.  But  no

satisfactory solution seemed likely in that direction.

With an average content of about 1% of fixed nitrogen, coal could not be

processed  for  obtaining  nitrogen  only.  The  delivery  of  nitrogen  as  a  by-

product set limits to its production which made it impossible to make good a

future deficiency of saltpetre from this source. It was clear that the demand

for fixed nitrogen, which at the beginning of this century could be satisfied

with a few hundred thousand tons a year, must increase to millions of tons.

A  demand  of  this  order  could  only  be  met  from  one source-from  the  im-

mense  supply  of  elementary  nitrogen  available  in  our  atmosphere-and  the

binding would have to be achieved by chemical means to the simplest and

most widely available chemical elements, if the solution was to measure up

to the demand. Just as the raw-material situation of our Earth indicates ele-

mentary nitrogen as the starting material, so ammonia or nitric acid are in-

dicated as end products by the requirements of plants. The task thus became

the  combining  of  elementary  nitrogen  with  oxygen  or  water.

This again was not a new or untried chemical problem. The combining of

nitrogen with hydrogen to form ammonia as with oxygen to produce nitr-

ates had already occupied science and, to some extent, technology.

Combination with hydrogen directly from the elements had been induced

by various forms of electrical discharge, which of course resulted in an ener-

gy  consumption  of  alarming  proportions.  Indirect  combination,  on  the

other  hand,  had  been  developed  with  remarkable  technical  results;  the  ni-

trogen  was  combined  with  other  elements  and  this  combination  was  then

hydrolysed  with  water  whereby  ammonia  was  splitt  off.  Only  the  spon-

taneous association of the elements was unknown when, in 1904, I began to

occupy myself with the subject; it was held to be impossible after pressure,

heat, and the catalytic action of platinum sponge had been found unable to

produce the effect.

The indirect method has occupied the attention of scientists and technol-

ogists  ever  since  Margueritte  and  Sourdeval,  basing  themselves  on  earlier

work by Bunsen and Playfair, developed it to the stage of sample produc-

tion  in  1860.  Caustic  baryte  and  coal  at  high  temperatures  with  nitrogen

yielded  barium  cyanide.  At  lower  temperatures  this  combination  broke

down in the presence of water vapour, yielding ammonia and creating ba-

rium  hydroxide  which  returned  to  the  process.  Thus,  during  alternate  for-




330

    1918  F.HABER

mation  and  breaking  down  of  barium  cyanide,  a  continuous  yield  of  am-

monia  and  carbon  dioxide  was  obtained  from  coal,  water  and  elementary

nitrogen.  In  the  half-century  following  the  publication  by  Margueritte  and

Sourdeval,  this  indirect  method,  the  early  technical  execution  of  which

made excessive demands on the reaction vessels, has been studied afresh in

many  modified  forms.

Barytes could be replaced by heat-resistant oxides of other metals or semi-

metals. The process of nitrogen fixation could be broken down into partial

steps,  first  forming,  by  reduction,  the  metal,  semi-metal  or  metal  carbide

which would, in a subsequent reaction, take up the nitrogen. As a solution

to the problem of ammonia synthesis the result has never been entirely satis-

factory.


If the reduction of oxide and the fixation of nitrogen took place in a single

process  then  this  required  an  extremely  high  temperature.  If  the  process  were

split  up,  intermediate  products  were  obtained  which  reacted  more  easily

with  nitrogen.  But  the  intermediate  product-metal,  semi-metal,  or  carbide

- then demanded, for its own production from the massive reserves of nat-

ural  products,  precisely  those  conditions  which  led  to  an  uneconomical

consumption  of  electrical  energy,  either  by  electrolytic  or  electrothermal

means.


The  more  tightly  knit  nitrogen  molecule  does  not  break  down  as  easily

as oxygen, the next element in the periodic system. The abundant examples

we have of autoxidation are thus matched by a complete lack of spontaneous

reaction of elementary nitrogen in the inanimate world at normal tempera-

tures. The inaccessibility of nitrogen nullified all the many efforts made to

develop a technical ammonia process.

In only one respect has the study of indirect methods of synthesizing am-

monia from the elements been able to get round the difficulties. Frank and

Caro  obtained  the  important  calcium  cyanamide  through  the  action  of  ni-

trogen  on  calcium  carbide  obtained  from  lime  and  coal  in  the  electric  arc.

Splitting  the  calcium  cyanamide  with  water  produces  ammonia,  and  the

process takes place in the soil without any particular help from us, once the

cyanamide has been added to the soil as fertilizer. The saving in factory pro-

cessing achieved by this, plus the fact that the only raw materials required

are lime, coal and nitrogen, have been important factors in the establishment

of the process.

Efforts to combine nitrogen with oxygen go back further than those aimed

at  combining  it  with  hydrogen.  The  basic  fact  of  the  combination  of  ni-




    A M M O N I A   S Y N T H E S I S   F R O M   E L E M E N T S

331


trogen with oxygen during sparking had already been observed by Caven-

dish  and  Priestley.  In  this  case  the  first  product  is  nitric  oxide,  which  converts

to  nitric  acid  in  a  spontaneous  reaction  with  oxygen  and  water.  The  nitric

oxide  synthesis  is  a  process  requiring  heat,  and  unless  energy  is  supplied  can,

for  thermodynamic  reasons,  only  occur  spontaneously  to  any  appreciable

extent  at  extremely  high  temperatures.  However,  the  supply  of  energy  re-

quired  at  normal  temperatures  is  so  small  that  disadvantage  of  having  to  pro-

vide it is outweighed by the advantage of needing only air and water as raw

materials. No better and more economical process for the binding of nitro-

gen could therefore be devised if some means could be found for converting

electrical energy into this kind of chemical energy without waste.

The  example  of  Nature,  which  produces  the  reaction  via  lightning  and

Cavendish’s earlier successful imitation of this with electric sparks, coupled

with  the  outstanding  electrotechnical  developments  of  the  final  decades  of

previous century, increasingly brought this method of solving the nitrogen

problem to the fore, as professional circles became less and less satisfied with

the  progress  achieved  through  combining  nitrogen  with  hydrogen.  The

brilliant  developments  which  these  efforts  produced  in  the  early  years  of

this century are general knowledge. The main outlines of the technical de-

sign coupled particularly with the names of Birkeland and Eyde, of Schoen-

herr and of Pauling, have for years been the object of a great deal of interest

among  experts.

Installations on a considerable scale were built in a number of places and

the  method  was  evidently  well  suited  to  making  use  of  the  vast  supply  of

energy which could be derived from waterfalls for chemical purposes; but

this method of synthesizing nitrogen has still not reached the levels of pro-

duction which it appeared to promise. Its progress is limited by the fact that

with  a  consumption  of  one  kilowatt-hour  no  more  than  16  grams  of  nitro-

gen are converted into nitric acid, whilst a complete conversion of electrical

to chemical energy ought to yield 30 times as much. An explanation of this

has been given by Muthmann and Hofer, who have demonstrated that the

high-tension  arc  used  in  this  process,  acts  as  a  Deville’s  heat  evaporation

chamber.

The formation of nitric oxide is determined, and limited, by thermal con-

ditions in the arc and its surroundings. Determination of the thermodynamic

equilibrium of nitric oxide synthesis by Nernst confirmed this explanation.

An extrapolatron of his experimental results and the best figures for the spe-

cific heat of the gases involved up to the temperature of 3,000

o

C or 4,000



o

C



332

      1918  F.HABER

led to the remarkable conclusion that more than 

1½ 


times or twice the tech-

nical yield per kilowatt-hour could still not be achieved when no re-forma-

tion  of  nitric  oxide  in  the  cooling  circuit  occurred  at  all.  The  source  of  the

low yield lay in the fact that the heating of a large air mass at very high tem-

peratures  enabled  only  a  small  fraction  to  convert  thermodynamically  to

nitric oxide. In spite of the fact that, for a variety of reasons, this calculation

cannot pretend to considerable accuracy, its result obviously approaches the

truth. Practical experience has shown that no worthwhile saving of energy

can be achieved by heat regeneration, manifestly because the deterioration

of the quenching action involved militates against this. It is impossible to do

away  with  the  arc  discharge  without  deviating  from  the  basic  processes

which  comply  with  the  requirements  of  mass  production.

However, it was perhaps not entirely impossible with a discharge arc to

get  away  from  the  temperature  range  in  which  rapid  adjustment  of  the

thermodynamic balance covered every more favourable possibility of chang-

ing electrical into chemical energy. After all, the arc existed by virtue of the

constant production of units of higher energy in the form of gas ions caused

by the electrical energy of electronic impacts and it was not a priori evident

that  the  subsequent  dissipation  of  energy  in  the  form  of  heat  precluded

everything else than the thermal result of nitric oxide synthesis, particularly

because Warburg and Leithaeuser had shown non-thermal synthesis of the

oxide by means of corona discharge.

This  possibility  aroused  much  interest  during  the  first  ten  years  of  this  cen-

tury  and  from  1907  led  me  to  start  investigations  which  I  pursued  over  a

number of years. Development has so changed opinions during those short

ten  years,  that  today  it  is  already  difficult  to  think  oneself  back  into  the  views

then generally held ; yet it is indicative that so experienced and professional

a  judge  of  chemico-technical  possibilities  as  the  "Badische  Anilin-  und  Soda-

fabrik" thought so highly of my efforts to obtain improved efficiency from

electrical energy in the combining of nitrogen and oxygen, as to get in touch

with me in 1908 and - by providing their resources - to facilitate my work

on  the  subject;  whereas  they  agreed  with  every  caution  to  the  proposal  to

back  me  in  the  high-pressure  synthesis  of  ammonia  as  well,  approving  it  only

with hesitation.

In fact, even in my later judgement, the question of whether technical re-

search should be concentrated on the direct synthesis of ammonia from the

elements really depended on whether the consumption of energy during the

combining of nitrogen and oxygen could be considerably reduced. In tech-




A M M O N I A   S Y N T H E S I S   F R O M   E L E M E N T S

333


nical  questions,  where  the  scales  oscillate  between  success  and  failure,  the

borderline between the two extremes is usually defined by modest differen-

ces  in  the  consumption  of  energy  and  materials,  and  variations  in  these  values

which  lie  within  one  decimal  power  will  determine  the  result.

With  a  number  of  excellent  assistants  I  therefore  studied  for  some  long

time  the  synthesis  of  nitric  oxide  by  electrical  discharge.  I  have  searched

through the pressure range from 12 atm. to 25 mm mercury, cooled the arc

both  from  the  wall  and  from  the  anode,  and  studied  the  relationship  between

energy  consumption  and  frequency  up  to  about 

50,000 


cycles  per  second.

We obtained nitric oxide concentrations of 10% in air at decreased pressure

which  indicated  a  deviation  from  the  thermodynamic  balance.  Yields  of

bound  nitrogen  were  also  noted  for  the  same  consumption  in  kilowatt-

hours which exceeded the earlier-mentioned value of 16 grams by 10-15%.

But  in  themselves  these  advantages  were  not  conclusive,  being  moreover

achieved by methods which were hardly suited to adaptation to mass-pro-

duction.  This  series  of  investigations  accordingly  led  to  a  strengthening  of

the view that the technical solution was to be sought in the direct combina-

tion  of  nitrogen  with  hydrogen.

A study of nitric-oxide synthesis in pressure flames led to the same result.

It  had  been  known  since  the  days  of  Bunsen  that  the  explosion  of  combustible

gas  with  nitrogen  and  oxygen  gives  rise  to  the  formation  of  nitrous  prod-

ucts, and Liveing and Dewar had described the formation of nitric acid in a

hydrogen flame under pressure. It appeared desirable to me also to familiar-

ize  myself  with  this  source  of  nitric  oxide,  in  which  heat  was  used  as  the

source of energy under conditions easily available in industry.

There were proposals to utilize the explosive reactions simultaneously in a

motor  and  as  a  source  for  the  synthesis  of  nitric  oxide.  I  myself  placed  no

faith  in  the  linking  of  two  such  widely-differing  functions.  Yet  the  utiliza-

tion of the heat of flame gases appeared to me to be not incompatible with

the  formation  of  nitric  oxide,  and  worthy  of  closer  investigation.  This  has

been extended over the flames of carbon monoxide, hydrogen and acetylene.

It  was  found  that  corresponding  to 

100 

molecules  of  the  main  products  of



combustion,  carbon  dioxide  and  hydrogen,  3  to  6  molecules  of  nitric  acid

could  be  obtained.  In  the  case  of  carbon  monoxide  and  hydrogen  this  re-

quired  increased  pressure.  Carbon  monoxide  had  the  advantage  over  the

hydrogenated gases, since the presence of water vapour in the hot products

of  combustion  favoured  the  reversion  of  the  nitric  oxide  in  the  elements

along  the  cooling  circuit.  With  this  gas  the  molecular  nitric  oxide:  carbon




334

      1918  F.HABER

monoxide ratio could easily be brought, with air, to 3 : 

100 


and with a mix-

ture rich in oxygen to double that ratio. For technical utilization however,

these values were not sufficient incentive; the weight, which declined on the

direct combining of nitrogen with hydrogen, therefore again underwent an

increase.

I  have  not  pursued  further  the  combining  of  nitrogen  and  hydrogen  by

corona discharge and by sparking. It seemed certain to me that this method

would not prove itself to be the most advantageous. In the final analysis the

assessment  of  each  method  rests  upon  the  ratio  between  the  energy  consumed

and the yield, in other words, between coal consumption and nitrogen yield

(the consumption of hydraulic power being reckoned as the equivalent con-

sumption  of  coal).

Nothing seemed less hopeful, though, than the thought that the enforced

combining of nitrogen with hydrogen could be achieved with so little ener-

gy that one would have spare energy left over for the production of hydro-

gen. There remained merely the possibility of discovering the requirements

for spontaneous formation of ammonia from the elements. The positive heat

of formation of ammonia indicated that such a synthesis might be achieved

without  the  assistance  of  electrical  energy.  Against  this  there  was  the  fact  that

neither Deville nor Ramsay and Young had obtained ammonia by heating

nitrogen and hydrogen.

Ramsay  and  Young  who,  in  1884,  during  their  study  of  the  decomposi-

tion of the gas in the neighbourhood of 800

o

C  had  consistently  observed  a



trace  of  undecomposed  ammonia,  made  great  efforts  to  obtain  this  trace

from the elements at this temperature using iron as a carrier. But with pure

gases  the  experiment  was  unsuccessful.  There  was  a  point  of  uncertainty

here,  and  if  this  could  be  cleared  up  it  would  indicate  the  possibility  of  a

direct synthesis of ammonia from the elements.

I

therefore began tentatively to determine the approximate position of the



ammonia equilibrium in the vicinity of 1000

o

C. It now transpired that ear-



lier trials had only proved negative by accident; it was easy, in the vicinity

of 1000


o

C and using iron as a catalyst, to obtain the same ammonia content

from both approaches. The results of individual experiments fluctuated be-

tween  1/200%  and  1/80%,  and  some  discrepant  values  seemed  to  me  to

point  to  the  upper  limit  as  the  probable  value;  later  more  precise  data  proved

the lower limit to be the correct figure and showed the origin of the higher

values to be in the properties of the catalysts, which when fresh temporarily

bring about the synthesis of surplus ammonia.




A M M O N I A   S Y N T H E S I S   F R O M   E L E M E N T S

335


It  was  further  shown  that  the  same  results  could  be  obtained  with  nickel  as

with iron, and it was found that calcium and in particular manganese were

catalysts  which  would  bring  about  a  combination  of  the  elements  even  at

lower  temperatures.  At  1,000

o

C  the  rate  of  reaction  was  adequate  with  a



small  amount  to  produce  continuously  a  comparatively  large  quantity  of

ammonia. By having a circulation system which alternately brought the gas

at high temperature in contact with the metal and then washed out the am-

monia at normal temperature, the conversion of a given mass of gas to am-

monia could proceed stage by stage.

By  determining  results  at  a  given  pressure,  temperature  and  initial  mix-

ture  of  nitrogen  and  hydrogen,  the  state  of  the  theory  allowed  obtainable

results  to  be  approximately  predicted  for  optional  temperatures,  pressures

and mixtures of nitrogen and hydrogen. In the light of the formula, it was

possible at once to foresee the increase of attainable maximum content with

decreasing temperature, its proportional relationship with the gas pressure,

and the fact that a mixture of 3 parts of hydrogen to 

part of nitrogen must



result in the highest ammonia content.

The most important point realized at that time was that from the begin-

ning of red heat onwards no catalyst will produce more than a trace of am-

monia  from  the  most  favourable  gas  mixture  at  normal  pressure,  and  that

even  at  greatly  increased  pressure  the  point  of  equilibrium  must  continue

very unfavourable. If one wished to obtain practical results with a catalyst

at normal pressure, then the temperature must not be allowed to rise much

beyond  300

o

.

At  that  point  it  seemed  to  me,  in  1905,  useless  to  pursue  the  problem



further. A combination of the elements had certainly been achieved, and the

requirements for large-scale synthesis had been outlined; but these require-

ments appeared so unfavourable that they deterred one from a deeper study

of the problem. The discovery of catalysts which would provide a rapid ad-

justment  of  the  point  of  equilibrium  in  the  vicinity  of  300

and  at  normal



pressure seemed to me quite unlikely: and they have not been found any-

where in the 15 years that have since elapsed.

The synthesis of ammonia which had been demonstrated at normal pres-

sure could be carried out at high pressure on a laboratory scale without any

great difficulties. It needed only a slight modification of the pressure oven,

such  as  that  used  by  Hempel  15  years  earlier  to  carry  out  nitrogen  absorption

in the case of indirect ammonia synthesis under pressures of up to 66 atmo-

spheres. But I did not think it worth the trouble; at that time I supported the




336

        1918  F.  HABER

widely-held opinion that a technical realization of a gas reaction at the be-

ginning  of  red  heat  under  high  pressure  was  impossible.  Here  the  matter

rested for the next three years.

Already in 1906, on the other hand, a new determination of the ammonia

equilibrium  proved  necessary.  In  the  course  of  his  investigations  into  the

heat theorem which has been named after him, Nernst succeeded in finding

an  approximate  formula  which  permitted  a  prediction  of  the  equilibria  based

on the values of the heat effect and the so-called chemical constants. In the

case of ammonia this gave a deviation from the values obtained at my first

measurements which, as later became apparent, was caused by the original

value  of  the  conventional  chemical  constant  of  hydrogen  then  used.  This

deviation led to fresh determinations of the equilibrium which Nernst had

carried out at his Institute in a pressure oven indicated by him while I, in

collaboration with Robert le Rossignol, repeated the determinations at nor-

mal pressure with greater care than before.

Further  work  followed,  devoted  to  determining  the  equilibrium  at  nor-

mal  pressure  and  at  30  atmospheres  over  an  extended  range  of  temperatures,

to calculating the heat of formation of ammonia from the elements at nor-

mal temperature and at the threshold of red heat, and finally to obtaining

knowledge of its specific heat at increased temperature. (See Annotation on

p.340.)

During  the  course  of  these  investigations,  together  with  my  young  friend



and  co-worker  Robert  le  Rossignol,  whose  work  I  would  like  to  mention

here with particular sincerity and gratitude, I took up once again, in 1908,




A M M O N I A   S Y N T H E S I S   F R O M   E L E M E N T S

337


the problem of ammonia synthesis abandoned three years earlier. Immedi-

ately  prior  to  this  I had  become  acquainted  with  the  technical  processes  in  the

liquefaction of air, and had simultaneously caught a glimpse of the formate

industry, which caused flowing carbon monoxide to act upon alkali under

heat and increased pressure, and I no longer considered it impossible to pro-

duce ammonia on a technical scale under high pressure and at high temper-

ature. But the unfavourable opinion of colleagues taught me that an impres-

sive advance would be needed to arouse technical interest in the subject.

To begin with, it was clear that a change to the use of maximum pressure

would  be  advantageous.  It  would  improve  the  point  of  equilibrium  and

probably  the  rate  of  reaction  as  well.  The  compressor  which  we  then  pos-

sessed  allowed  gas  to  be  compressed  to  200  atmospheres,  and  thus  deter-

mined  our  working  pressure  which  could  not  easily  be  exceeded  for  any

very large series of experiments. In the neighbourhood of this pressure, the

catalysts, with which we had become familiar in the course of our equilib-

rium determinations, very easily provided a rapid combination of nitrogen

and hydrogen at above 700

o

C; this applied notably to manganese, followed



by  iron.

To  achieve  impressive  results,  however,  we  needed  to  discover  catalysts

which  would  induce  rapid  conversion  at  between  500

and  600



o

C. We hit

upon the idea of searching the sixth, seventh and eighth groups in the Peri-

odic System, whose principal metals chromium, manganese, iron and nickel

possessed  very  definite  catalytic  properties,  for  metals  which  acted  even

more favourably; these we found in uranium and osmium. At the same time

we  discovered  in  osmium  an  excellent  example  of  the  extent  to  which  the

performance  of  a  catalyst  depends  on  its  composition.  When  used  at  200

atmospheres,  both  requirements  which  we  deemed  necessary  to  a  techni-

cally-convincing  conduct  of  the  experiment,  were  met;  the  first  concerned

the  ammonia  content,  the  second  the  amount  of  ammonia  produced  per

cubic  centimetre  of  contact  space  per  hour.

With  a  content  of  about  5%  the  circulation  process  described  in 

1905


was no longer a description of a method of synthesis, but a means of manu-

facture. With a yield of several grams of ammonia per hour per cubic centi-

metre  of  heated  high-pressure  chamber  the  dimensions  of  the  chamber

could be made so small that we felt the objections from the industry must

d i s a p p e a r .

Finally we needed an improvement in the circulation system which could

act as model for technical realization; separating the synthesis of ammonia



338

      1918  F.HABER

and its removal from the flow of gas by means of reducing the pressure was

not a suitable method. The cycle of ammonia production and removal must

clearly be achieved by the simplest possible means at a constant high pres-

sure. It seemed essential that the heat produced during the synthesis of am-

monia should be removed from exhaust gases, where it had only a deleteri-

ous effect, and be led to the fresh gas so that the process itself yielded the heat

required  for  its  operation.  The  construction  and  operation  (carried  out  in

collaboration with Robert le Rossignol) of a small-scale plant which suited

these requirements, together with the performance of the new catalysts men-

tioned, was indeed sufficient to persuade the "Badische Anilin- und Soda-

fabrik" which thus far had devoted its attention to the indirect method of

producing ammonia by means of the nitrides of aluminium, silicium and ti-

tanium, to undertake high-pressure synthesis from the elements.

The company then studied the catalysts on a large scale, using far more

substantial  means,  and  discovered  ways,  in  the  temperature  employed  in

their  production  plant  and  particularly  in  the  deliberate  use  of  inert  ma-

terials,  of  improving  the  performance  of  poor  catalysts  to  the  level  of  os-

mium and uranium. Their results were, indeed, important in the case of the

classic  ammonia  catalyst  employed  by  Ramsay  and  Young,  namely  iron.

They also discovered an improvement in the design of the oven which over-

came the effect of hydrogen on the carbon content of steel which they had

observed over a long period of operation.

The main work of the company however, was in substituting electrolytic

hydrogen,  with  which  we  conducted  our  experiments,  for  water-gas  hy-

drogen  which  introduced  impurities.  The  difficulties  encountered  by  the

Technical  Director  Dr.  Bosch  resembled  those  which  his  predecessor  Knietsch

had overcome with equal success in the course of his technical application of

the sulphuric acid contact process. Dr. Bosch has made a large-scale industry

of ammonia synthesis.

Present-day  industrial  working  pressures  in  the  vicinity  of  200  atmo-

spheres,  a  working  temperature  of  about  500-600

o

C,  circulation  under



constant  high  pressure,  and  the  method  of  heat  exchange  from  exhaust  to

inlet gas are all main features of laboratory work which have been retained.

Recently Claude has announced an improvement of the process in the ap-

plication  of  higher  pressures.  The  pressure  range  around  200  atmospheres

was originally chosen since it represented the limit of easily attainable levels

at the current stage of development in compressor technique. In subsequent

experiments Mr. Greenwood and I have gone as far as 370 atmospheres. An



A M M O N I A   S Y N T H E S I S   F R O M   E L E M E N T S

339


increase in pressure is basically only of interest if it considerably reduces the

temperature of rapid conversion without creating fresh technical difficulties.

From the tabulated equilibria (p. 336), it can be seen that the change from

normal  pressure  to  200  atmospheres  creates  favourable  equilibrium  condi-

tions  -  existing  between  200

o

and  300



o

C  -  at  a  temperature  300

o

C  higher,



which  stimulates  more  greatly  the  activity  of  the  catalysts.  Why  a  higher

temperature is needed is a question which we must leave to a more enlight-

ened period of science to answer. The heterogenous catalysis of the gas re-

actions is a process which in the initial phase apparently represents an elec-

trodynamic distortion of the molecule by the atomic fields at the boundary

of  the  solid  catalyst  material  with  the  gas  space;  it  is  thus  a  phenomenon

from a field of molecular physics into which Stark’s discovery had just given

us a first glimpse.

The  synthesis  of  ammonia  from  the  elements  is  a  result  which  physical

chemistry was bound to reach. The notion of the reversibility of the break-

down of ammonia was already held by Deville, Ramsay and Young, and by

1901  Le  Chatelier  had  already  given  thought  to  the  effects  of  temperature

and pressure. Failure of the first attempts at synthesis however led him to

abandon the matter and to publish his deliberations only in the obscurity of

a French patent taken out under a foreign name. This only came to my no-

tice a long time after the successful conclusion of my experiments.

The solution to the problem which has been found assumes its importance

from the fact that very high temperature levels are not employed and that

this  makes  the  ratio  of  coal  consumption  to  nitrogen  production  more  fa-

vourable than is the case with other processes. Results are enough to show

that,  in  combination  with  other  methods  of  nitrogen  fixation  which 

have



mentioned, they relieve us of future worries caused by the exhaustion of the

saltpetre deposits that has threatened us these 20 years.

It may be that this solution is not the final one. Nitrogen bacteria teach us

that Nature, with her sophisticated forms of the chemistry of living matter,

still understands and utilizes methods which we do not as yet know how to

imitate.  Let  it  suffice  that  in  the  meantime  improved  nitrogen  fertilization

of  the  soil  brings  new  nutritive  riches  to  mankind  and  that  the  chemical

industry  comes  to  the  aid  of  the  farmer  who,  in  the  good  earth,  changes

stones into bread.



340

      1918  F.HABER



Annotation to p.336

The  results,  in  brief,  were  as  follows:

(a) Actual specific heat Cp of the ammonia gas per mol at constant pressure between

309


o

C and 523

o

C is:


Cp  =  8.62  3.5  x  10

-3t 


+  5.1  x  10

-6

t



2

.

(b) Heat of formation Q of the ammonia gas at constant pressure in gramcalories per



mol from the elements at t

o

is:

Q = 


10,950 

+  4.85t  -  0.93 

1 0


-3

t

2



-1.7  X  10

-6

t



3

(c) Percent content of ammonia in equilibrium with nitrogen-hydrogen mixture

(3 Vol. H

+ 1 Vol. N



2

):

The following expression has been used for the calculation:



Also expressions with higher temperature links may be adapted to the observations. A

rational expression can only then be postulated when a rational statement concerning



the  specific  heat  of  all  three  participant  gases  has  succeeded.


Yüklə 118,87 Kb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©genderi.org 2023
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə