Heat recovery


Enzymatic degumming: a missing link in the



Yüklə 116,32 Kb.
Pdf görüntüsü
səhifə6/7
tarix18.04.2022
ölçüsü116,32 Kb.
#85567
1   2   3   4   5   6   7
14-amaliy, курсовая муратовой Ситоры ту25 (Unicode Encoding Conflict 1)
5.3

Enzymatic degumming: a missing link in the

physical refining of soft oils?

Physical refining was originally developed for high(er) FFA oils (such as palm

oil) for which chemical refining is not economically attractive. Physical refining

results in more easily valorised side products (e.g. deodoriser distillate), but

generally requires better quality crude oil. It is therefore more suitable for

integrated crushing–refining plants with better control over the incoming

crude oil quality.

The broader industrial application of physical refining first requires an

efficient degumming process that can ensure a very good degummed oil

quality (P



<

10 ppm) even when applied to lower quality crude (soft) oils.

The traditional classification of phospholipids into so-called hydratable

and nonhydratable components is well known in the literature. Hydratable

phospholipids can easily be removed during water degumming, which is

generally applied as first refining step in the oilseed extraction plant. The

resulting gums can either be added back to the deoiled meal or valorised

separately as lecithin.

Nonhydratable phospholipids are removed during so-called acid degum-

ming. This is usually the first stage of physical refining and can be considered

the equivalent process to alkali neutralisation in chemical refining. Important

developments in acid degumming date from the 1980s, driven by the first real

interest in physical refining. New features such as improved dosing systems,

more powerful mixing systems (to get finer dispersion of the degumming

acid), addition of caustic and oil cooling for gum hydration were successfully



132

CH 5


EDIBLE OIL REFINING: CURRENT AND FUTURE TECHNOLOGIES

implemented and resulted in a significant improvement in degumming effi-

ciency. Processes such as TOP degumming (Vandemoortele) and Super- and

Uni-degumming (Unilever), which are still used today in edible oil refining,

were developed during that period.

First-generation enzymatic degumming (Enzymax process), soft degum-

ming (Tirtiaux) and membrane degumming (Cargill, Desmet) were developed

in the 1990s. The need for a milder but still efficient degumming process

requiring less chemicals was the main driver. Unfortunately, these degum-

ming processes were never broadly implemented on an industrial scale.

Miscella membrane degumming (Lin & Koseoglu, 2004) was applied indus-

trially for a short time but was soon abandoned due to excessive problems

with irreversible membrane fouling. Industrial application of soft degumming

(Deffense, 2002) was hindered by the fact that ethylenediaminetetraacetic

acid (EDTA) was used as a chelating agent, which raised some acceptability

issues. The main drawbacks of the Enzymax process (Clausen, 2001) were the

high enzyme cost, the relatively poor stability and selectivity of the enzyme

and the fact that a porcine pancreas lipase was used.

A renewed interest in enzymatic degumming has been observed in recent

years. This is mostly due to the commercial availability of several new, cost-

efficient and stable phospholipases with sufficiently high enzyme activity,

developed and guaranteed by various suppliers (Table 5.1). In addition, there

is the new market approach of the enzyme producers, who no longer present

enzyme degumming as an efficient degumming process but rather as a process

that results in a significantly higher refined oil yield. With the current high

edible oil prices, oil refiners are very sensitive to this feature, making it the

most important driver for the wider application of ‘new-generation’ enzymatic

degumming.

Current commercial phospholipases are all of microbial origin. Their mode

of action is illustrated in Figure 5.2. Phospholipase A1 (PL-A1, e.g. Lecitase

Ultra from Novozymes) and phospholipase A2 (PL-A2, e.g. Rohalase MPL

from AB Enzymes, GumZyme from DSM) both release a fatty acid from

the phospholipid molecule, resulting in a lysophospholipid and an FFA.


Yüklə 116,32 Kb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:
1   2   3   4   5   6   7




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©genderi.org 2022
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə