Heat recovery


Table 5.1 Commercially available phospholipases for enzymatic degumming. Enzyme trade name



Yüklə 116,32 Kb.
Pdf görüntüsü
səhifə7/7
tarix18.04.2022
ölçüsü116,32 Kb.
#85567
1   2   3   4   5   6   7
14-amaliy, курсовая муратовой Ситоры ту25 (Unicode Encoding Conflict 1)
Table 5.1

Commercially available phospholipases for enzymatic degumming.



Enzyme trade name

Producer

Activity

Lecitase Ultra

Novozymes

Phospholipase A1

Rohalase MPL

AB Enzymes

Phospholipase A2

GumZyme


DSM

Phospholipase A2

Lysomax

Danisco


Lipid Acyltransferase

(type A2)

Purifine

®

DSM



Phospholipase C


5.3

ENZYMATIC DEGUMMING: A MISSING LINK IN THE PHYSICAL REFINING OF SOFT OILS?



133

C

A2



A1

O

X = choline (phosphatidylcholine or PC)



ethanolamine

inositol, link in 1-position

choline

HO

C



H

2

C



NH

2

H



2

X = ehanolamine (phosphatidylethanolamine, PE)

X = inositol (phosphatidylinositol or PI)

X = hydrogen (phosphatidic acid or PA)

O

O

O



X

P



O

D

C



O

C

O



R

1

O



CH

H

2



C

H

2



C

R

2



HO

C

H



2

C

N



CH

3

CH



3

CH

3



H

2

OH



OH

O

OH



OH

OH

+



Figure 5.2

Specific activities of the various commercial phospholipases. A1, phospholipase

A1; A2, phospholipase A2; C, phospholipase C; D, phospholipase D.

Theoretically, conversion of 0.1% PL (40 ppm P) leads to formation of

0.036% FFA. With sufficient reaction time (depending on enzyme dosing),

phospholipases A1 and A2 are relatively unselective and will degrade nearly

all phospholipids. LysoMax (Danisco) is a lipid acyltransferase (PL-A2 type)

which transfers FFA released from phospholipids to free sterols, resulting

in the formation of sterol esters. Unlike FFA, sterol esters are not removed

during the refining process and thus represent a limited but real increase

in the refined oil yield. Phospholipase C (PL-C, e.g. Purifine

®

from DSM)



releases the P-containing part of the phospholipid molecule, with formation

of diacylglycerols and phosphate esters as degradation products. Conversion

of each 0.1% phospholipids results in the formation of 0.084% diacylglyc-

erols. Phospholipase C will only react with phosphatidylcholine (PC) and

phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) and has virtually no effect on phosphatidic

acid (PA) or phosphatidylinositol (PI) (Hitchman, 2009).

A general flow sheet of an enzymatic degumming process (basically inde-

pendent of the type of enzyme being used) is given in Figure 5.3. The first step is

the acid conditioning/pH adjustment of the crude or water degummed oil. This

step is required to make the nonhydratable phospholipids more accessible

for enzyme degradation at the oil–water interface and to bring the pH closer

to the optimal pH of the enzyme. Afterwards, the enzyme is added – either

pure or diluted in water. High shear mixing is required to ensure optimal

distribution in the oil. Enzyme dosing depends on the type of enzyme and

on the phospholipids content of the oil, but usually varies between 50 and

200 ppm. The optimal reaction temperature is 50–60

C, while the required




134

CH 5


EDIBLE OIL REFINING: CURRENT AND FUTURE TECHNOLOGIES

Steam


Deodorized Oil

Acid


Caustic

Acid Reaction

Tank

Degumming



Centrifuge

Enzyme


Enzyme

Reaction Tank

GUMS

Wash water



Washing

Centrifuge

Water

ENZYMATIC



DEGUMMED

OIL


Steam

To storage

CRUDE OIL

Steam


Figure 5.3

Typical process flow diagram of a deep enzymatic degumming process. Courtesy of Desmet Ballestra.




5.3

ENZYMATIC DEGUMMING: A MISSING LINK IN THE PHYSICAL REFINING OF SOFT OILS?



135

reaction time mainly depends on the enzyme dosing. While in the past it

was common practice to apply a longer reaction time with a low enzyme

dosage (e.g. 30 ppm enzyme for 6 hours’ reaction), preference is now given

to a shorter reaction time with higher enzyme dosage (e.g. 100 ppm enzyme

for 2 hours’ reaction). This practice is preferred because it increases the

flexibility of the process while keeping the operating (enzyme) cost at an

acceptable level. Finally, the heavy phase (consisting of water and lyso gums

or phosphate esters) is separated by centrifugation from the degummed oil.

Two different types of enzymatic degumming can be distinguished: so-called

enzymatic water degumming and deep enzymatic degumming. Enzymatic

water degumming is typically applied in (soybean) crushing plants. Several

large-capacity plants in South America (Argentina, Brazil etc.) are already

running in this mode. Increased oil yield is the main driver for its implemen-

tation. The expected yield increase depends on the type of oil (P content) and

the type of enzyme used. The highest increase (up to 1.8%) can be expected

when crude soybean oil is enzymatically degummed with PL-C (Hitchmann,

2009; Kellens, 2009); in this case, the oil yield increase is the sum of the dia-

cylglycerols formed and the lower neutral oil entrainment in a smaller heavy

phase (gums fraction). A lower yield increase (1.0–1.5%) will be obtained

from PL-C degumming of crude rapeseed oil or when phospholipase A1 or A2

is used on crude soybean oil (Kellens, 2009). In the latter case, the net oil yield

increase is due to the lower neutral oil entrainment in the gums fraction alone.

An increase in refined oil yield is obviously a very attractive feature

of enzymatic (PL-C) water degumming, but by itself it is not enough to

lead to implementation in all crushing plants. In the overall cost/benefit

analysis of the process, the enzyme cost and side-stream valorisation are

also taken into account. Depending on the value of (lyso-) lecithin, it may

be more profitable for a crusher to apply simple water degumming or

enzymatic water degumming with PL-A1/PL-A2. The latter gives a lower net

oil yield improvement compared to PL-C enzymatic degumming but yields a

lysolecithin side stream that may have value for specific applications.

PL-C enzymatic degummed soybean oil typically still has 100–150 ppm

residual P (mainly present in PA and PC). A significantly better degumming

efficiency (P

<

10 ppm) can be obtained when crude or water degummed

vegetable oils are enzymatically degummed with commercial PL-A1 or

PL-A2. This so-called ‘deep enzymatic degumming’ is already applied in

several industrial plants. In addition to the increased oil yield, the very effi-

cient phospholipid removal – making the degummed oil suitable for physical

refining – is of great interest to refiners. As an alternative option, a combina-

tion of PL-C and PL-A1/PL-A2 can be used for deep enzymatic degumming

(Dayton, 2011; Galhardo & Dayton, 2012). The two enzymes can be added

either separately or as a cocktail, depending on the plant design. Although the

potential advantages of the latter process are well described in the (patent)



136

CH 5


EDIBLE OIL REFINING: CURRENT AND FUTURE TECHNOLOGIES

literature (Dayton & Galhardo, 2008; Gramatikova



et al

., 2011), it is still

rarely applied on industrial scale.

A potential alternative to enzymatic degumming is the direct enzymatic

deoiling of the lecithin fraction resulting from the water degumming of crude

oils. In this patented process (De Greyt & Kellens, 2010), a phospholipase

(e.g. Lecitase Ultra) is added to the wet lecithin and the phospholipids are

degraded into much less hydrophobic lysophospholipids. As a result, 80–90%

of the entrapped neutral oil can be recovered by simple static decantation

or centrifugation (Kellens, 2009; Kellens



et al

., 2010). The recovered neutral

oil (FFA content: 25–30%) can be recycled to the crude or degummed oil

or can be used as such as biodiesel feedstock, while the lysolecithin can

be added back to the deoiled meal. The main advantages of the enzymatic

lecithin deoiling process over enzymatic degumming are the lower enzyme

consumption (

50% less) and the fact that it is applied on a small side stream,



with no impact on the oil degumming/refining process. The process has been

tested successfully on a pilot scale but is currently not yet applied on an

industrial scale.

5.4

Bleaching: from single-stage colour removal

to multistage adsorptive purification

Bleaching was introduced in edible oil refining at the end of the 19th

century to improve the colour of cottonseed oil. Originally, it was a batch

process at atmospheric pressure, in which natural bleaching clay was added

to hot oil with the sole objective of removing colouring pigments. Today

this is no longer the case, and bleaching has become a critical process in

edible oil refining. It has gradually turned from a single-stage ‘bleaching’

into a multistage adsorptive purification process in which a wide range

of unwanted components (soaps, phospholipids, oxidation products, trace

metals, contaminants etc.) are removed prior to deodorisation.

In order to reach this point, a whole series of process improvements was

gradually introduced, with the aim of reducing the overall processing cost

and improving the bleached oil quality. Vacuum bleaching was implemented

first, in order to avoid oxidation and related colour fixation and improve

the oxidative stability. Later, as the capacity of refining plants increased,

bleaching evolved from a batch to a (semi-) continuous process. This evolu-

tion further improved the bleached oil quality and made the process more

energy efficient. Another process improvement was the implementation of

(horizontal/vertical) pressure leaf filters. Initially, plate and frame filters were

used, but these lost favour over the years due to the too high residual oil



content in the spent bleaching earth (typically 35–40%) (Veldkamp, 2012).

Yüklə 116,32 Kb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:
1   2   3   4   5   6   7




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©genderi.org 2022
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə