Hubblerpp dvi



Yüklə 227,21 Kb.

səhifə1/8
tarix14.12.2017
ölçüsü227,21 Kb.
  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8


24. The Cosmological Parameters

1

24. THE COSMOLOGICAL PARAMETERS



Updated November 2013, by O. Lahav (University College London) and A.R. Liddle

(University of Edinburgh).

24.1. Parametrizing the Universe

Rapid advances in observational cosmology have led to the establishment of a precision

cosmological model, with many of the key cosmological parameters determined to one

or two significant figure accuracy. Particularly prominent are measurements of cosmic

microwave background (CMB) anisotropies, with the highest precision observations being

those of the Planck Satellite [1,2] which for temperature anisotropies supersede the

iconic WMAP results [3,4]. However the most accurate model of the Universe requires

consideration of a range of different types of observation, with complementary probes

providing consistency checks, lifting parameter degeneracies, and enabling the strongest

constraints to be placed.

The term ‘cosmological parameters’ is forever increasing in its scope, and nowadays

often includes the parameterization of some functions, as well as simple numbers

describing properties of the Universe. The original usage referred to the parameters

describing the global dynamics of the Universe, such as its expansion rate and curvature.

Also now of great interest is how the matter budget of the Universe is built up from its

constituents: baryons, photons, neutrinos, dark matter, and dark energy. We need to

describe the nature of perturbations in the Universe, through global statistical descriptors

such as the matter and radiation power spectra. There may also be parameters describing

the physical state of the Universe, such as the ionization fraction as a function of time

during the era since recombination. Typical comparisons of cosmological models with

observational data now feature between five and ten parameters.

24.1.1.


The global description of the Universe

:

Ordinarily, the Universe is taken to be a perturbed Robertson–Walker space-time with



dynamics governed by Einstein’s equations. This is described in detail by Olive and

Peacock in this volume. Using the density parameters Ω

i

for the various matter species



and Ω

Λ

for the cosmological constant, the Friedmann equation can be written



i

i



+ Ω

Λ

− 1 =



k

R

2



H

2

,



(24.1)

where the sum is over all the different species of material in the Universe. This equation

applies at any epoch, but later in this article we will use the symbols Ω

i

and Ω



Λ

to refer


to the present values.

The complete present state of the homogeneous Universe can be described by giving the

current values of all the density parameters and the Hubble constant h (the present-day

Hubble parameter being written H

0

= 100h km s



−1

Mpc


−1

). A typical collection would be

baryons Ω

b

, photons Ω



γ

, neutrinos Ω

ν

, and cold dark matter Ω



c

(given charge neutrality,

the electron density is guaranteed to be too small to be worth considering separately and

is included with the baryons).

The spatial curvature can then be determined from the

other parameters using Eq. (24.1). The total present matter density Ω

m

= Ω


c

+ Ω


b

is

sometimes used in place of the cold dark matter density Ω



c

.

K.A. Olive et al. (PDG), Chin. Phys. C38, 090001 (2014) (http://pdg.lbl.gov)



August 21, 2014

13:18



2

24. The Cosmological Parameters

These parameters also allow us to track the history of the Universe back in time, at

least until an epoch where interactions allow interchanges between the densities of the

different species, which is believed to have last happened at neutrino decoupling, shortly

before Big Bang Nucleosynthesis (BBN). To probe further back into the Universe’s

history requires assumptions about particle interactions, and perhaps about the nature of

physical laws themselves.

The standard neutrino sector has three flavors. For neutrinos of mass in the range

5 × 10


−4

eV to 1 MeV, the density parameter in neutrinos is predicted to be

ν

h



2

=

m



ν

93 eV


,

(24.2)


where the sum is over all families with mass in that range (higher masses need a more

sophisticated calculation). We use units with c = 1 throughout. Results on atmospheric

and Solar neutrino oscillations [5] imply non-zero mass-squared differences between the

three neutrino flavors. These oscillation experiments cannot tell us the absolute neutrino

masses, but within the simple assumption of a mass hierarchy suggest a lower limit of

approximately 0.06 eV on the sum of the neutrino masses.

Even a mass this small has a potentially observable effect on the formation of structure,

as neutrino free-streaming damps the growth of perturbations. Analyses commonly now

either assume a neutrino mass sum fixed at this lower limit, or allow the neutrino mass

sum as a variable parameter. To date there is no decisive evidence of any effects from

either neutrino masses or an otherwise non-standard neutrino sector, and observations

impose quite stringent limits, which we summarize in Section 24.3.4. However, we note

that the inclusion of the neutrino mass sum as a free parameter can affect the derived

values of other cosmological parameters.

24.1.2.

Inflation and perturbations



:

A complete model of the Universe should include a description of deviations from

homogeneity, at least in a statistical way. Indeed, some of the most powerful probes of

the parameters described above come from the evolution of perturbations, so their study

is naturally intertwined in the determination of cosmological parameters.

There are many different notations used to describe the perturbations, both in terms

of the quantity used to describe the perturbations and the definition of the statistical

measure. We use the dimensionless power spectrum ∆

2

as defined in Olive and Peacock



(also denoted P in some of the literature). If the perturbations obey Gaussian statistics,

the power spectrum provides a complete description of their properties.

From a theoretical perspective, a useful quantity to describe the perturbations is the

curvature perturbation R, which measures the spatial curvature of a comoving slicing of

the space-time. A simple case is the Harrison–Zel’dovich spectrum, which corresponds

to a constant ∆

2

R

. More generally, one can approximate the spectrum by a power-law,



writing

2



R

(k) = ∆


2

R

(k



)

k



k

n



s

−1

,



(24.3)

August 21, 2014

13:18





Dostları ilə paylaş:
  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©genderi.org 2019
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə