Infection Control Risk Assessment (icra) Instructor Guide



Yüklə 1,59 Mb.
Pdf görüntüsü
səhifə5/13
tarix15.11.2018
ölçüsü1,59 Mb.
#79822
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   13

 

  

 



14 

 

Click on the PowerPoint one more time so the following questions appear: 

What does “Code Blue” mean?

 

What does “Code Red” mean?



 

What does “Code Green” mean?

 

Ask the class  

Would anyone like to answer the first question?  



Once they answer it, click on the PowerPoint. Repeat this for the next 2 

questions until all 3 questions have been answered. 

Click on the PowerPoint once, “Site Specific Codes” appears. 

 

Explain that hospitals may have different codes. These will be explained in a 

facility briefing when you start working on the job. You need to know what these 

codes mean, and what to do when an alarm is announced. Some codes won’t 

affect you, but some might require you to evacuate the building. 

Working in a health care facility carries with it certain 

risks. 

NOTES FOR SLIDE 15 

Before working in a health care 

setting, all of your immunizations 

should be current. To avoid getting 

the hospital patients sick, it is very 

important not to come to work sick. 

Additionally, your supervisor should 

be notified if anyone on your crew 

becomes sick while working at a 

health care facility. 

The following are examples of immunizations workers should consider when 

working within an ICRA environment: 

  Influenza vaccination (flu shot) 



  Tetanus, diphtheria, and acellular pertussis (Td/Tdap) vaccination 

  Varicella vaccination (Chickenpox) 



  Measles, mumps, rubella (MMR) vaccination 

  Hepatitis B vaccination 



Something as simple as catching a cold at work may be an indication the 

precautions are not working. Any illness or infection contracted at the facility 




 

  

 



15 

 

should be reported to the infection control department so they can take whatever 



steps necessary to trace, track and contain any potential outbreaks. 

Examples of immune compromising conditions are: 

  Hepatitis 



  chronic pneumonia 

  HIV 


  asbestosis 



Hospitals hazards that are not on typical construction 

sites. 

NOTES FOR SLIDE 16 

Only show the title of the 

PowerPoint slide 



Hospitals 

hazards that are not on typical 

construction 

sites.”

 

 

ASK THE CLASS: 

Think about the various utilities and 

medical devices in a hospital room, are there any unique hazards in these rooms 

that are not found on typical construction hazards? 



 

Write the participant responses on a whiteboard or flipchart. 

Review the information on slide 16 to fill in any gaps the list might have. 

Mechanical, Electrical and Plumbing 

systems are critical, and can’t be 

interrupted.  

Medical Gas Lines - Medical gas lines are an extra utility to be concerned with in 

hospitals. You may encounter color-coded outlets, and lines inside the walls. 

  Oxygen 



  Nitrogen  

  Nitrous oxide  



  Carbon dioxide  

  Low-


pressure “medical air” 

 



  High-

pressure “instrument air”

 



  Negative-pressure vacuum  




 

  

 



16 

 

Glass Pipes - The glass is very resistant to chemicals 



and won’t corrode, so it is 

typically used for waste lines in hospitals and laboratories. You should assume 

that these lines contain hazardous chemicals or biohazards. 

Once the class has reviewed the hazards found in a hospital room ask 

them if there are any unique hazards outside of the hospital that we need to 

be aware of.  

Helipads - Many hospitals have helipads, landing areas for ambulance 

helicopters. If your construction project involves a crane or excavator, it must 

lower its boom when a helicopter is operating nearby, as well as at the end of the 

shift. Workers using aerial lifts near helipads must also watch for approaching 

helicopters, the downwash could cause the lift to overturn. 



Hospitals are concerned about hospital-acquired 

infections. 

NOTES FOR SLIDE 17 

Hospital-acquired infections or HAI, 

is when a patient acquires, or gets, 

an infection inside the hospital. 



ASK THE CLASS: 

Does anyone have an example of a 

hospital acquired infection that 

happened to them or someone they 

know? 

Limit the number of stories to one or two in the interest of time. 

Hospital-acquired infections are a huge problem. HAIs occur in all settings of 

care, including hospitals, surgical centers, ambulatory clinics, and long-term care 

facilities such as nursing homes and rehabilitation facilities. 

 

According to a study published online September 2, 2013 in JAMA Internal 



Medicine, HAIs are costing healthcare facilities almost $10 billion a year. 

According to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), about 1.7 million hospital-

acquired infections occur each year and more importantly, about 99,000 hospital 

patients die from HAIs each year. 

 

 




Yüklə 1,59 Mb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   13




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©genderi.org 2022
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə