Infection Control Risk Assessment (icra) Instructor Guide



Yüklə 338,53 Kb.

səhifə7/13
tarix15.11.2018
ölçüsü338,53 Kb.
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   10   ...   13

 

  

 



21 

 

Aspergillus fungus can cause an infection called 



aspergillosis. 

NOTES FOR SLIDE 25

 

 

Aspergillus fungus can cause an 

infection called aspergillosis. This 

disease usually affects people with 

weakened immune systems, such as 

hospital patients. A less-serious form 

of aspergillosis causes allergic 

symptoms like coughing and 

wheezing, but doesn’t invade the 

body and destroy tissues.  

 

Invasive aspergillosis most commonly causes lung disease, but it can spread 



throughout the body and infect other organs. Aspergillosis is usually caused by 

inhaling aspergillus spores. The very small size of aspergillus spores lets them 

settle deep into the lungs. A hospital patient could also become infected by 

spores on dust particles falling out of the air into an open wound or surgical 

incision. 

 

According to a 2006 report in the Journal of Hospital Infections*, medical 



researchers who traced aspergillosis outbreaks in hospitals found that almost 

half of those infections were related to construction activity in the hospital. Dust is 

a prime carrier of aspergillus spores, and construction activities create dust. This 

is why ICRA procedures to control dust are so critical. 

 

*(The Journal of Hospital Infection July 2006 Volume 63, Issue 3, Pages 246



254) 


 

Legi

onella is a bacterium that can cause Legionnaires’ 

disease. 

NOTES FOR SLIDE 26

 

 

These bacteria were named in 1976, 

when many people who went to an 

American Legion convention in 

Philadelphia got sick from this 

disease. 

Among more than 2,000 

attendees of a Legionnaires' 

convention held at the Bellevue-

Stratford Hotel, 221 attendees 

contracted the disease and 34 of them died.

 



 

  

 



22 

 

Legionnaires' disease is transmitted by inhalation of



 

water mist or vapor and/or 

soil contaminated with the

 

Legionella



 

bacteria. Legionnaires' disease is not 

transmitted from person to person. 

 

The



 

length of time between exposure to the bacteria and the appearance of 

symptoms

 

is generally two to 10 days, but can extend to as much as 20 days. 



For those in the hospital, between 0.4 to 14% exposed to the bacteria will 

develop the disease. While among those in the general population exposed, 

between 0.1 to 5% will develop the disease. 

 

Legionella can be found throughout healthcare facilities. 



NOTES FOR SLIDE 27 

 

Legionella bacteria are found 

naturally in the environment, usually 

in warm water. Sources where 

temperatures allow the bacteria to 

thrive include hot-water tanks, 

cooling towers, evaporative 

condensers of large air-conditioning 

systems, and even decorative fountains, such as those commonly found in 

hospitals.

  

 

During construction projects, hospital water systems are often disrupted. If the 



water is shut off, there could be legionella bacteria that were harmlessly stuck to 

the inside of a pipe that come loose when the water is turned back on. Shutting 

off some of the water during construction could create a dead end in the system, 

allowing water to stagnate and bacteria to multiply. 

 

In 2015, five cooling towers in the South Bronx NY tested positive for legionella 



 including towers at the Lincoln Medical and Mental Health Center. None of the 

people who became ill had been patients or staff members at Lincoln Medical 

and Mental Health Center. The towers at all five contaminated sites were flushed 

and cleaned with antibacterial solutions to decontaminate and sterilize them. 

 

 




 

  

 



23 

 

The reservoir is the environment in which the pathogen 



is found. 

NOTES FOR SLIDE 28

 

 



Only show the title of the 

PowerPoint slide 

“The reservoir is 

the environment in which the 

pathogen is found

.”

 

 

Construction projects uncover 



reservoirs of disease producing 

pathogens during demolition, 

renovation, maintenance and construction; the risk for transmittal must be 

identified prior to starting any work. 

 

ASK THE CLASS: 

Can you think of any areas in a hospital that would be considered a reservoir? 

 

Write the participant responses on a whiteboard or flipchart. 

Click on the PowerPoint to reveal the suggested areas. Compare the list the 

class generated with the list from the PowerPoint.  

 

ASK THE CLASS: 

Are there any new areas they have thought of after seeing the PowerPoint? 

 

Add them to your whiteboard or flip chart. 

 

Review the following areas as a minimum number of areas considered to 

be reservoirs: 

  Behind drywall 



  Ceilings/Plenum spaces 

  Ductwork 



  Plumbing systems 

  Cooling towers 



 

 





Dostları ilə paylaş:
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   10   ...   13


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©genderi.org 2017
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə