International refereed journal of design and architecture print issn



Yüklə 32 Kb.

səhifə78/147
tarix17.11.2018
ölçüsü32 Kb.
1   ...   74   75   76   77   78   79   80   81   ...   147

MTD
www.mtddergisi.com
ULUSLARARASI HAKEMLİ TASARIM VE MİMARLIK DERGİSİ
Ocak  /  Şubat / Mart  / Nisan  2017 Sayı: 10 Kış - İlkbahar 
INTERNATIONALREFEREEDJOURNAL OF DESIGNANDARCHITECTURE
January / February / March / April 2017 Issue: 10 Winter – Spring
ID:123 K:210
ISSN Print: 2148-8142 Online: 2148-4880
 (ISO 18001-OH-0090-13001706 / ISO 14001-EM-0090-13001706 / ISO 9001-QM-0090-13001706 / ISO 10002-CM-0090-13001706)
(Marka Patent No / Trademark)
(2015/04018 – 2015/GE/17595)
166
ULUSLARARASI HAKEMLİ
TASARIM MİMARLIK DERGİSİ
INTERNATIONAL REFEREED
JOURNAL OF DESIGN AND ARCHITECTURE
PRINT ISSN: 2148-8142 - ONLINE ISSN: 2148-4880
INTRODUCTION
From  the  early  20th  century  to  the  present 
day,  rapid  revolution  in  production  forms, 
technological  advances,  the  increasingly 
shrinking world caused by globalization and 
the Internet and different ideologies develo-
ped from all these changes have caused mo-
dern cities to become crowded and complex, 
leading to difficult problems. Of course, the 
community as a whole is most affected as a 
result of these phenomena. Individuals in so-
ciety exist between buildings that are greater 
than the human scale: they are stuck in their 
routines, isolated from other members of the 
community and uprooted from their own cul-
tural habits which represents a threat to cities. 
The Internet seems to promise freedom, but 
is actually isolating individuals and similarly, 
technology is increasing the distances between 
people while increasing the speed of transpor-
tation. All social life is based on consumption. 
“The public spaces of modern cities are limi-
ted by consumption and only put consuming 
on stage or they are limited by touristic life 
and put tourism on stage” (Sennet, 1999:14). 
The Open spaces in the cities are no longer a 
reflection of the inner life. The buildings and 
their surrounding open spaces, which appear 
to be open to the public, are serving capital 
and spurning public interest. Hovewer, rese-
arch in recent years points out that the presen-
ce of public spaces in a city is extremely im-
portant to improve the social life of citizens. 
The individuals can reach them easily on foot 
and are able to roam freely in public spaces, 
may become friends by interacting with other 
people, can socialize and can get rid of their 
loneliness by feeling a part of the city. In this 
way,  happier and more effective people can 
grow up in such cities. 
CONVERSION of OPEN CITY AREAS to 
the PUBLIC SPACES
To be able to accept the open city areas like 
plazas and streets as public spaces; Habermas 
(2004)  explained  that  “free  access”,  “equal 
participation” and “social equality” must be 
obvious. These  properties  should  be  combi-
ned with “interaction”. Because, when the pe-
ople interact with each other, share common 
activities  and  even  project  their  own  ideas 
onto these spaces, they will feel more a part 
of the community.
Public Art for the Public Spaces 
The  most  effective  tool  is  of  course  “art” 
bringing  communities  together,  providing 
interaction  and  building  a  bridge  between 
people from different cultures. Art activities 
embracing people of all ages can be organi-
zed in various forms in the public spaces in 
the cities. These can be combined with tech-
nological installations such as light, laser and 
projection  and  different  disciplines  such  as 
the performing arts and sculpture can be com-


MTD
www.mtddergisi.com
ULUSLARARASI HAKEMLİ TASARIM VE MİMARLIK DERGİSİ
Ocak  /  Şubat / Mart  / Nisan  2017 Sayı: 10 Kış - İlkbahar 
INTERNATIONALREFEREEDJOURNAL OF DESIGNANDARCHITECTURE
January / February / March / April 2017 Issue: 10 Winter – Spring
ID:123 K:210
ISSN Print: 2148-8142 Online: 2148-4880
 (ISO 18001-OH-0090-13001706 / ISO 14001-EM-0090-13001706 / ISO 9001-QM-0090-13001706 / ISO 10002-CM-0090-13001706)
(Marka Patent No / Trademark)
(2015/04018 – 2015/GE/17595)
167
ULUSLARARASI HAKEMLİ
TASARIM MİMARLIK DERGİSİ
INTERNATIONAL REFEREED
JOURNAL OF DESIGN AND ARCHITECTURE
PRINT ISSN: 2148-8142 - ONLINE ISSN: 2148-4880
bined for these art activities. All art facilities 
that are oriented towards the public and are 
open to spontaneous, friendly interaction, are 
defined as “public art”. The example of “The 
RedBall Public Art Project”—( an invitation 
to engage and to collectively imagine.),  ig-
nites  a  sense  of  wonder,  curiosity,  commu-
nity engagement, and is just plain fun (Blank 
Space  2016).  The  project  has  been  touring 
for several years making its way through all 
the  capitals  of  the  world  (Figure  1).  In  this 
example, both audience and artist can interact 
with each other and the people start to beco-
me aware of things around them by watching, 
listening and/or touching. “These interventi-
ons of art interrogate the quality of life, the 
social awareness and the spatial memory and 
force the audiences to have an intellectual un-
derstanding of visuals” (Ergin, 2005:111).
Figure 1. The RedBall Public Art Project
The aim of artistic activity is to create awa-
reness of the citizens about the environment 
they live in. It may not convey any message. 
People walking with haste to reach somewhe-
re, without self-will, uninvited and even a litt-
le forced, can witness these activities. Those 
who  want  to  watch  will  stop,  while  others 
will keep going. Being loved or hated is of 
no importance, hence the citizen would be af-
fected in such a way by experiencing the art. 
To make public art more effective, the artist 
must  surprise  people,  entertain  and  be  very 
creative.
GUERRILLA  MARKETING  on  the 
STREETS and GRAPHIC DESIGN
The characteristics of public art have attracted 
the  interest  of  marketing  firms. The  variety 
of products in the global market, public we-
ariness towards of advertising and publicity 
bombardment,  and  the  high  costs  spent  on 
marketing have encouraged marketing firms 
to find new methods. The necessity to deve-
lop more specific strategies has enhanced the 
importance of guerrilla marketing.  The gene-
ral definition of “Guerrilla Marketing”, first 
defined by Jay Conrad Levinson in 1984, in 
America, is the effort to influence people by 
catching  them  in  unexpected  places  and  ti-
mes (Figure 2). The messages of portrayed in 
guerrilla marketing also create a viral adver-
tising  effect  by  enthralling  the  target  group 
with  amazing  ideas,  provocative  action  and 
creativity. (Dadaart 2015).



Dostları ilə paylaş:
1   ...   74   75   76   77   78   79   80   81   ...   147


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©genderi.org 2017
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə