Investigating the Relationship Between Exposure to Television Programs that Depict Paranormal



Yüklə 199,07 Kb.
Pdf görüntüsü
səhifə7/7
tarix13.11.2017
ölçüsü199,07 Kb.
#10230
1   2   3   4   5   6   7

survey was weighted more toward reality programs, this difference could play some

role in the different pattern of findings uncovered in the two surveys. For example, it

could be that the results reported in this study supporting the resonance hypothesis

are more likely to hold when a measure of fictional programming is used. For

respondents who reported a prior experience with the paranormal, fictional pro-

grams may constitute the “double-dose” of the paranormal message referred to in

the resonance hypothesis. For those with no prior paranormal experience, viewing

fictional paranormal programming does not constitute a double-dose, thus reducing

the likelihood of a relationship between viewing these programs and belief in the

paranormal. In the study by Sparks et al. (1997) that relied upon a measure of

paranormal programs that was weighted toward reality programs, viewing of

these programs was significantly related to paranormal beliefs for viewers with

no prior experience with the paranormal. It could be that for these viewers, the

reality of the depictions tends to be persuasive because the viewers have no

personal experience to counter the “reality” depicted. The fact that Sparks et al.

(1997) failed to confirm the resonance hypothesis for those with prior experience

with the paranormal may suggest that when reality programs are involved, a

different process takes place that overrides the cultivation process of resonance.

Perhaps for these viewers, the apparent reality of the depictions triggers a

cognitive process that involves contrast and comparison between the “real”

experiences depicted in the media and the viewers’ own private experiences.

Perhaps these processes lead viewers to note the dissimilarities between the

“real” experiences depicted in the media and personal experiences. In such

cases, instead of a “double-dose” of the same message, viewers may process the

media message as running counter to their own experiences.

If the above analysis has any merit, it suggests that future attention should be

directed toward studying the role of fiction and reality programs in the cultiva-

tion of paranormal beliefs. It is interesting to note that Sparks et al. (1997)

underscored the need to examine perceived realism of paranormal depictions as

an important variable in understanding the impact of paranormal TV on

paranormal beliefs. We believe it is important to re-emphasize this point.

Following Potter’s work on perceived reality (Potter, 1986, 1988), we expect that

media impact in this domain might be dependent on such reality judgments. It is

also the case that paranormal programming probably produces a much wider

range of reality judgments than other types of programming (e.g., news program-

ming). Therefore, it appears critical to examine this variable in future studies. Of

course, this analysis is only one possible explanation for the conflicting results

between the two studies, but it would appear to be a plausible explanation that is

worth exploring in future investigations.

RQ2, which asked about the impact of demographic variables on paranormal

beliefs, was evaluated in the regression equations. The findings that emerged in the

regression equations were informative with respect to these variables. There was no

evidence that age, income, weekly attendance at a religious service, or general

intensity of religious belief were related to paranormal beliefs. This might not be

surprising with respect to age or income, but the skeptical community has often

associated religious belief with belief in the paranormal. However, our finding that

neither of the measures pertaining to religion were predictors of paranormal belief is

consistent with the findings of several other studies (Duncan, Donnelly, & Nichol-

110

COMMUNICATION MONOGRAPHS




son, 1992; Grimmer & White, 1990; Williams, Taylor, & Hintze, 1989). Data seems

to be accumulating to suggest that the relationship between religious belief and

paranormal belief may not be very strong. Undoubtedly, there are conceptual

grounds for distinguishing between these two domains.

There was some evidence for a weak relationship between biological sex and

belief in the paranormal; females showed a slight tendency to endorse paranor-

mal beliefs more than males. There is some precedent in the literature for this

finding (Wolfradt, 1997), but in general, the differences between males and

females in this realm appear to be small. The largest relationship between

paranormal beliefs and a demographic variable was found for level of education.

As one might expect, individuals with higher levels of education were less likely

to endorse paranormal beliefs. This finding appears to be consistent with the

notion that education encourages the development of critical thinking skills that

result in closer scrutiny and ultimate rejection of many paranormal claims.

Consistent with this idea, Gray and Mill (1990) found a significant relationship

between the application of critical thinking skills and rejection of paranormal

beliefs.

The data accumulating on the relationship between media exposure and beliefs in

the paranormal suggest that there may be an important media effect in this realm

that has received relatively little attention from scholars of mass communication. It is

important for future studies to replicate the findings that have been reported thus far

and, in the case of the resonance hypothesis, seek to untangle the inconsistent results

that have emerged to date. Like the survey reported by Sparks et al. (1997), this study

has the strength of using a random sampling procedure of an entire city. This

method is considerably stronger than one that appears frequently in the literature—

convenience samples of college students. The use of random samples of larger

populations enables some meaningful generalization of research findings. Labora-

tory experiments and surveys of this type should continue to be useful tools for

advancing our knowledge about the media’s role in beliefs about paranormal

phenomena.

Conclusion

Research on the influence of the media on beliefs in the paranormal is still in

its infancy. The studies to date, including this one, demonstrate that this area of

inquiry may hold considerable promise in advancing our understanding about

media effects. One glaring hole in the current literature is the lack of any

systematic content analysis of media content that focuses on paranormal themes.

Clearly, this sort of study is overdue and stands to inform us about the prevalence

of these themes in a systematic way. Ultimately, we believe that research on the

media and paranormal beliefs stands to offer new insights about media effects as

well as the way individuals form their basic belief systems. There may also be

implications for the design of educational curricula on critical thinking and the

media. In the final analysis, we believe that paranormal beliefs and the media’s

role in cultivating or discouraging them is a critical topic for mass communica-

tion scholars to understand well. Society is shaped by what people believe. If the

media play a central role in encouraging people to adopt beliefs about reality that

are unsubstantiated, there may well be widespread implications for future society

that are incalculable at the present time.

111


TELEVISION AND PARANORMAL BELIEFS


Notes

1

Robert Kiviat is a Hollywood producer who has worked on a number of programs that deal with the



paranormal. His most famous work is probably the “Alien Autopsy” series produced for the FOX network. In a

series of programs, Kiviat shows footage of an alien autopsy that supposedly originated from the now infamous

Roswell incident in the late 1940s. Over the series of programs, it becomes clear that there is good reason to

conclude that the film is a hoax. Kiviat takes primary responsibility for investigating the film’s origins and for

tracking down the evidence that led to the verdict that the film was a hoax.

2

The sample was random with respect to the numbers dialed, but not with respect to the people living in the



household contacted. Unless the person answering the phone was under 18-years of age, the interview was

presented to the person who answered the phone. Persons under 18-years old were not used due to the

additional contingencies of parental permission that would have been involved in order to satisfy guidelines for

ethical treatment of human subjects. In the case of 5 respondents, data on sex was not collected. The city used

for the sample was the same one used in the study by Sparks et al. (1997). It has a population of about 50,000

with a very small minority population (i.e., less than 2% of any particular minority group).

3

Although “uncertainty,” “belief,” and “disbelief” appear to be categories on a nominal scale, they clearly



represent levels of certainty in the belief system such that the scales are at least ordinal. In this respect, the scale

is no different than any 5-point scale that calls for an indication of agreement with an attitude statement.

Although strictly qualifying as only ordinal measures, such scales are commonly treated as if they are interval.

A long history of statistical testing reveals that in most cases, treating ordinal level data as if it were interval level

causes few differences of consequence in the data analysis.

References

Alcock, J.E. (1981). Parapsychology: Science or magic? Oxford, England: Pergamon Press.

Arkes, H.R., Hackett, C., & Boehm, L. (1989). The generality of the relation between familiarity and judged

validity. Journal of Behavioral Decision Making, 2, 81–94.

Bacon, F.T. (1979). Credibility of repeated statements: Memory for trivia. Journal of Experimental Psychology:



Human Learning and Memory, 5, 241–252.

Begg, I., & Armour, V. (1991). Repetition and the ring of truth: Biasing comments. Canadian Journal of



Behavioral Science, 23, 195–213.

Begg, I.M., Anas, A., & Farinacci, S. (1992). Dissociation of processes in belief: Source recollection, statement

familiarity, and the illusion of truth. Journal of Experimental Psychology: General, 121, 446 – 458.

Doob, A.N., & Macdonald, G.E. (1979). Television viewing and fear of victimization: Is the relationship causal?



Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 37, 170 –179.

Duncan, D.F., Donnelly, J.W., & Nicholson, T. (1992). Belief in the paranormal and religious belief among

American college students. Psychological Reports, 70, 15–18.

Evans, C. (1973). Parapsychology—what the questionnaire revealed. New Scientist, 25, 209.

Feder, K.L. (1984). Irrationality and popular archaeology. American Antiquity, 49, 525–541.

Gallup, G.H., & Newport, F. (1991). Belief in paranormal phenomena among adult Americans. Skeptical



Inquirer, 15, 137–146.

Gerbner, G., Gross, L., Morgan, M., & Signorielli, N. (1986). Living with television: The dynamics of the

cultivation process. In J. Bryant & D. Zillmann (Eds.), Perspectives on media effects (pp. 17– 40). Hillsdale, New

Jersey: Lawrence Erlbaum.

Gerbner, G., Gross, L., Morgan, M., & Signorielli, N. (1994). Growing up with television: The cultivation

perspective. In J. Bryant and D. Zillmann (Eds.), Media effects: Advances in theory and research (pp. 17– 41). New

Jersey: Lawrence Erlbaum.

Gersh, D. (March 18, 1987). Disclaiming horoscopes. Editor an Publisher, 22–23.

Gray, T., & Mill, D. (1990). Critical abilities, graduate education (Biology vs. English), and belief in

unsubstantiated phenomena. Canadian Journal of Behavioural Science, 22, 162–172.

Gray, K., & Sparks, G.G. (1996). [A Content Analysis of Paranormal Events on Prime-Time Television.]

Unpublished raw data.

Grimmer, M.R., & White, K.D. (1990). The structure of paranormal beliefs among Australian psychology

students. Journal of Psychology, 124, 357–370.

Groth-Marnat, G., & Pegden, J.A. (1998). Personality correlates of paranormal belief: Locus of control and

sensation seeking. Social Behavior & Personality, 26, 291–296.

Hasher, L., Goldstein, D., & Toppino, T. (1977). Frequency and the conference of referential validity. Journal of

Verbal Learning and Verbal Behavior, 16, 107–112.

Hawkins, R.P., Pingree, S., & Adler, I. (1987). Searching for cognitive processes in the cultivation effect: Adult

and adolescent samples in the United States and Australia. Human Communication Research, 13, 553–577.

Heard, K.V., & Vyse, S.A. (1999). Authoritarianism and paranormal beliefs. Imagination, Cognition &



Personality, 18, 121–126.

112


COMMUNICATION MONOGRAPHS


Hirsch, P.M. (1980). The “scary world” of the nonviewer and other anomalies: A reanalysis of Gerbner et al.’s

findings on cultivation analysis, part I. Communication Research, 7, 403– 456.

Jaroff, L. (1995). Weird Science. Time, (May, 15), 75–76.

Jones, W.H., Russell, D.W., & Nickel, T.W. (1977). Belief in the paranormal scale: An objective instrument to

measure belief in magical phenomena and causes. JSAS Catalog of Selected Documents in Psychology, 7, 100. (Ms.

No. 1577).

Korem, D. (1988). Powers: Testing the psychic & supernatural. Downers Grove, IL: InterVarsity Press.

Kurtz, P. (1985). The responsibilities of the media and paranormal claims. Skeptical Inquirer, 9, 357–362.

Lange, R. (1999). The role of fear in delusions of the paranormal. Journal of Nervous & Mental Disease, 187,

159 –166.

Maione, I. (1998). Testing Put to the Test. Skeptical Inquirer, 22(3), 21–22.

Maller, J.B., & Lundeen, G.E. (1932). Sources of superstitious beliefs. Journal of Education Research, 26, 321–343.

Morgan, R.K., & Morgan, D.L. (1998). Critical thinking and belief in the paranormal. College Student Journal, 32,

135–139.


National Television Violence Study, Volume 1. (1997). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications.

Ogles, R.M. (1987). Cultivation analysis: Theory, methodology, and current research on television-influenced

constructions of social reality. Mass Comm Review, 14, 43–53.

Ogles, R.M., & Hoffner, C. (1987). Film violence and perceptions of crime: The cultivation effect. In M.L.

McLaughlin (Ed.), Communication yearbook 10 (pp. 384 –394). Newbury Park, CA: Sage.

Potter, W.J. (1986). Perceived reality and the cultivation hypothesis. Journal of Broadcasting & Electronic Media,



30, 159 –174.

Potter, W.J. (1988). Perceived reality in television effects research. Journal of Broadcasting & Electronic Media, 32,

23– 41.

Potter, W.J. (1994). Cultivation theory and research: A methodological critique. Journalism Monographs, 147,



1–34.

Randi, J. (April 13, 1992). Help stamp out absurd beliefs. Time, 80.

Regan, D. (1988). For the record. New York: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich.

Schwartz, M. (1982). Repetition and the rated truth value of statements. American Journal of Psychology, 95,

393– 407.

Shrum, L.J. (1996). Psychological processes underlying cultivation effects: Further tests of construct accessibil-

ity. Human Communication Research, 22, 482–509.

Sparks, G.G. (1998). Paranormal depictions in the media: How do they affect what people believe. Skeptical



Inquirer, 22, 35–39.

Sparks, G.G., Hansen, T., & Shah, R. (1994). Do televised depictions of paranormal events influence viewers’

paranormal beliefs? Skeptical Inquirer, 18, 386 –395.

Sparks, G.G., Nelson, C.L., & Campbell, R.G. (1997). The relationship between exposure to televised messages

about paranormal phenomena and paranormal beliefs. Journal of Broadcasting & Electronic Media, 41,

345–359.


Sparks, G.G., & Ogles, R.M. (1990). The difference between fear of victimization and the probability of being

victimized: Implications for cultivation. Journal of Broadcasting & Electronic Media, 34, 351–358.

Sparks, G.G., & Pellechia, M. (1997). The effect of news stories about UFOs on readers’ UFO beliefs: The role

of confirming or disconfirming testimony from a scientist. Communication Reports, 10, 165–172.

Sparks, G.G., Pellechia, M., & Irvine, C. (1998). Does television news about UFOs affect viewers’ UFO beliefs?:

An experimental investigation. Communication Quarterly, 46, 284 –294.

Sparks, G.G., Sparks, C.W., & Gray, K. (1995). Media impact on fright reactions and belief in UFOs: The

potential role of mental imagery. Communication Research, 22, 3–23.

Thalbourne, M.A. (1994). Belief in the paranormal and its relationship to schizophrenia-relevant measures: A

confirmatory study. British Journal of Clinical Psychology, 33, 78 – 80.

Tobacyk, J., & Milford, G. (1983). Belief in paranormal phenomena: Assessment instrument development and

implications for personality functioning. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 44, 1029 –1037.

Tversky, A., & Kahneman, D. (1973). Availability: A heuristic for judging frequency and probability. Cognitive

Psychology, 5, 207–232.

Williams, R.N., Taylor, C.B., & Hintze, W.J. (1989). The influence of religious orientation on belief in science,

religion and the paranormal. Journal of Psychology and Theology, 17, 352–359.

Wolfradt, U. (1997). Dissociative experiences, trait anxiety and paranormal beliefs. Personality and Individual



Differences, 23, 15–19.

Zaragoza, M.S., & Mitchell, K.J. (1996). Repeated exposure to suggestion and the creation of false memories.



Psychological Science, 7, 294 –300.

Received: July 19, 2000

Accepted: December 20, 2000

113


TELEVISION AND PARANORMAL BELIEFS

Yüklə 199,07 Kb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:
1   2   3   4   5   6   7




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©genderi.org 2023
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə