June 13 Replacement



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June 13 Replacement





June 13 Replacement






June 13






Jan 13





Jan 13





June 12





June 12






January 12





January 12





June 11

6. Jake and Kamil are sometimes late for school.

The events J and K are defined as follows


J = the event that Jake is late for school,

K = the event that Kamil is late for school.
P(J ) = 0.25, P(JK) = 0.15 and P(J ′  K′) = 0.7.
On a randomly selected day, find the probability that
(a) at least one of Jake or Kamil are late for school,

(1)

(b) Kamil is late for school.



(2)
Given that Jake is late for school,
(c) find the probability that Kamil is late.

(3)
The teacher suspects that Jake being late for school and Kamil being late for school are linked in some way.
(d) Determine whether or not J and K are statistically independent.

(2)

(e) Comment on the teacher’s suspicion in the light of your calculation in part (d).



(1)

6.







(a)

0.3

B1







(1)

(b)

P(K) = 0.05 + 0.15 or “0.3” – 0.25 + 0.15 or “0.3” = 0.25 +P(K) – 0.15

M1




May be seen on Venn diagram







= 0.2

A1







(2)

(c)



M1




=

A1




= or 0.6

A1







(3)

(d)

or or may see P(J|K) = 0.75 and P(J) = 0.25

M1




not equal therefore not independent

A1ft







(2)

(e)

Not independent so confirms the teacher’s suspicion or they are linked

B1ft




(This requires a statement about independence in (d) or in (e))

(1)







(9 marks)


June 11

8. A spinner is designed so that the score S is given by the following probability distribution.


s

0

1

2

4

5

P(S = s)

p

0.25

0.25

0.20

0.20

(a) Find the value of p.



(2)

(b) Find E(S).



(2)

(c) Show that E(S 2) = 9.45.



(2)

(d) Find Var(S).



(2)

Tom and Jess play a game with this spinner. The spinner is spun repeatedly and S counters are awarded on the outcome of each spin. If S is even then Tom receives the counters and if S is odd then Jess receives them. The first player to collect 10 or more counters is the winner.


(e) Find the probability that Jess wins after 2 spins.

(2)

(f) Find the probability that Tom wins after exactly 3 spins.



(4)

(g) Find the probability that Jess wins after exactly 3 spins.



(3)

8.







(a)

= or 0.1

M1, A1







(2)

(b)

E(S) = , (or equiv. in decimals) = 2.55

M1, A1







(2)

(c)

E or 0.25 + 1 + 3.2 + 5 = 9.45 (*)

M1, A1cso








(2)

(d)

Var(S) = 9.45 , = 2.9475 or (accept awrt 2.95)

M1, A1








(2)

(e)

P(5 and 5 ) = , =

M1, A1








(2)

(f)

P(4, 4, 2) = ( = 0.03 or )

M1, M1





P(4, 4, 4) ( = 0.008 or )

B1





P(Tom wins in 3 spins) = 0.038

A1







(4)

(g)

P = 0.064 or

M1, M1, A1







(3)







17


Jan 11

7. The bag P contains 6 balls of which 3 are red and 3 are yellow.

The bag Q contains 7 balls of which 4 are red and 3 are yellow.

A ball is drawn at random from bag P and placed in bag Q. A second ball is drawn at random from bag P and placed in bag Q.

A third ball is then drawn at random from the 9 balls in bag Q.


The event A occurs when the 2 balls drawn from bag P are of the same colour.

The event B occurs when the ball drawn from bag Q is red.


(a) Copy and complete the tree diagram shown below.



(4)
(b) Find P(A).

(3)

(c) Show that P(B) = .



(3)

(d) Show that P(A B) = .



(2)

(e) Hence find P(A B).



(2)

(f) Given that all three balls drawn are the same colour, find the probability that they are all red.



(3)





June 10

2. An experiment consists of selecting a ball from a bag and spinning a coin. The bag contains 5 red balls and 7 blue balls. A ball is selected at random from the bag, its colour is noted and then the ball is returned to the bag.
When a red ball is selected, a biased coin with probability of landing heads is spun.

When a blue ball is selected a fair coin is spun.


(a) Copy and complete the tree diagram below to show the possible outcomes and associated probabilities.



(2)
Shivani selects a ball and spins the appropriate coin.
(b) Find the probability that she obtains a head.

(2)

Given that Tom selected a ball at random and obtained a head when he spun the appropriate coin,


(c) find the probability that Tom selected a red ball.

(3)

Shivani and Tom each repeat this experiment.


(d) Find the probability that the colour of the ball Shivani selects is the same as the colour of the ball Tom selects.

(3)


June 10

4. The Venn diagram in Figure 1 shows the number of students in a class who read any of 3 popular magazines A, B and C.

Figure 1
One of these students is selected at random.
(a) Show that the probability that the student reads more than one magazine is .

(2)

(b) Find the probability that the student reads A or B (or both).



(2)

(c) Write down the probability that the student reads both A and C.



(1)
Given that the student reads at least one of the magazines,
(d) find the probability that the student reads C.

(2)

(e) Determine whether or not reading magazine B and reading magazine C are statistically independent.



(3)


Jan 10

1. A jar contains 2 red, 1 blue and 1 green bead. Two beads are drawn at random from the jar without replacement.
(a) Draw a tree diagram to illustrate all the possible outcomes and associated probabilities. State your probabilities clearly.

(3)

(b) Find the probability that a blue bead and a green bead are drawn from the jar.



(2)



Jan 10

4. There are 180 students at a college following a general course in computing. Students on this course can choose to take up to three extra options.
112 take systems support,

70 take developing software,

81 take networking,

35 take developing software and systems support,

28 take networking and developing software,

40 take systems support and networking,

4 take all three extra options.
(a) Draw a Venn diagram to represent this information.

(5)
A student from the course is chosen at random.
Find the probability that the student takes
(b) none of the three extra options,

(1)

(c) networking only.



(1)
Students who want to become technicians take systems support and networking. Given that a randomly chosen student wants to become a technician,
(d) find the probability that this student takes all three extra options.

(2)


June 09
2. On a randomly chosen day the probability that Bill travels to school by car, by bicycle or on foot is , and respectively. The probability of being late when using these methods of travel is , and respectively.
(a) Draw a tree diagram to represent this information.

(3)

(b) Find the probability that on a randomly chosen day


(i) Bill travels by foot and is late,
(ii) Bill is not late.

(4)

(c) Given that Bill is late, find the probability that he did not travel on foot.



(4)



June 09

7. (a) Given that P(A) = a and P(B) = b express P(A B) in terms of a and b when
(i) A and B are mutually exclusive,
(ii) A and B are independent.

(2)
Two events R and Q are such that
P(R Q ‘ ) = 0.15, P(Q) = 0.35 and P(R | Q) = 0.1
Find the value of
(b) P(R Q),

(1)

(c) P(R Q),



(2)

(d) P(R).



(2)



Jan 09

2. A group of office workers were questioned for a health magazine and were found to take regular exercise. When questioned about their eating habits said they always eat breakfast and, of those who always eat breakfast also took regular exercise.
Find the probability that a randomly selected member of the group
(a) always eats breakfast and takes regular exercise,

(2)

(b) does not always eat breakfast and does not take regular exercise.



(4)

(c) Determine, giving your reason, whether or not always eating breakfast and taking regular exercise are statistically independent.



(2)



June 08

1. A disease is known to be present in 2% of a population. A test is developed to help determine whether or not someone has the disease.
Given that a person has the disease, the test is positive with probability 0.95.
Given that a person does not have the disease, the test is positive with probability 0.03.
(a) Draw a tree diagram to represent this information.

(3)
A person is selected at random from the population and tested for this disease.
(b) Find the probability that the test is positive.

(3)
A doctor randomly selects a person from the population and tests him for the disease. Given that the test is positive,
(c) find the probability that he does not have the disease.

(2)

(d) Comment on the usefulness of this test.



(1)



June 08

5. A person’s blood group is determined by whether or not it contains any of 3 substances A, B and C.
A doctor surveyed 300 patients’ blood and produced the table below.


Blood contains

No. of Patients

only C

100

A and C but not B

100

only A

30

B and C but not A

25

only B

12

A, B and C

10

A and B but not C

3

(a) Draw a Venn diagram to represent this information.



(4)

(b) Find the probability that a randomly chosen patient’s blood contains substance C.



(2)

Harry is one of the patients. Given that his blood contains substance A,


(c) find the probability that his blood contains all 3 substances.

(2)

Patients whose blood contains none of these substances are called universal blood donors.


(d) Find the probability that a randomly chosen patient is a universal blood donor.

(2)


Jan 08

5. The following shows the results of a wine tasting survey of 100 people.
96 like wine A,

93 like wine B,

96 like wine C,

92 like A and B,

91 like B and C,

93 like A and C,

90 like all three wines.
(a) Draw a Venn Diagram to represent these data.

(6)

Find the probability that a randomly selected person from the survey likes


(b) none of the three wines,

(1)

(c) wine A but not wine B,



(2)

(d) any wine in the survey except wine C,



(2)

(e) exactly two of the three kinds of wine.



(2)
Given that a person from the survey likes wine A,
(f) find the probability that the person likes wine C.

(3)



Jan 08
7. Tetrahedral dice have four faces. Two fair tetrahedral dice, one red and one blue, have faces numbered 0, 1, 2, and 3 respectively. The dice are rolled and the numbers face down on the two dice are recorded. The random variable R is the score on the red die and the random variable B is the score on the blue die.
(a) Find P(R = 3 and B = 0).

(2)

The random variable T is R multiplied by B.


(b) Complete the diagram below to represent the sample space that shows all the possible values of T.



3















2





2








1


0











0














B
R

0

1

2

3


Sample space diagram of T

(3)
The table below represents the probability distribution of the random variable T.


t

0

1

2

3

4

6

9

P(T = t)

a

b





c



d

(c) Find the values of a, b, c and d.



(3)
Find the values of
(d) E(T),

(2)

(e) Var(T).



(4)


June 07

4. A survey of the reading habits of some students revealed that, on a regular basis, 25% read quality newspapers, 45% read tabloid newspapers and 40% do not read newspapers at all.
(a) Find the proportion of students who read both quality and tabloid newspapers.

(3)

(b) Draw a Venn diagram to represent this information.



(3)
A student is selected at random. Given that this student reads newspapers on a regular basis,
(c) find the probability that this student only reads quality newspapers.

(3)



Jan 07

2. In a factory, machines A, B and C are all producing metal rods of the same length. Machine A produces 35% of the rods, machine B produces 25% and the rest are produced by machine C. Of their production of rods, machines A, B and C produce 3%, 6% and 5% defective rods respectively.
(a) Draw a tree diagram to represent this information.

(3)

(b) Find the probability that a randomly selected rod is


(i) produced by machine A and is defective,
(ii) is defective.

(5)

(c) Given that a randomly selected rod is defective, find the probability that it was produced by machine C.



(3)



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