Karl Bücher



Yüklə 285,49 Kb.
Pdf görüntüsü
səhifə1/13
tarix15.08.2018
ölçüsü285,49 Kb.
#62687
  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   13


 

1

Karl Bücher 



Theory — History — Anthropology —  

Non Market Economies 

 

Edited by 



Jürgen G. Backhaus 

Metropolis-Verlag  

Marburg 2000 

*    *    * 

 

 

 



Karl Bücher and the Geographical Dimensions of Techno-Economic Change 

Production-Based Economic Theory and the Stages of Economic Development 



 

Erik S. Reinert 

 

‘In every inquiry concerning the operations of men when united together in society, 



the first object of attention should be their mode of subsistence. Accordingly as that 

varies, their laws and policies must be different’  

William Robertson (1721-1793), The History of America, 1777 

 

1. The Idea of Stages — from Tacitus to Karl Bücher and Carlota Perez  

History – it has been said – was created to prevent everything from happening simultaneously. 

History implies that events happen in sequence. Stage theories are attempts, based on different 

criteria, to organise history in sequential stages. In their most general form, stage theories postu-

late that a key factor in the process of socio-economic development is the mode of subsistence, 

i.e. what, how, and with which tools a society produces. Stage theories are tools that can be used 

to study both the qualitative changes in the division of labour over time, and the processes of in-

stitutional design and change which accompany these changes. Stage theories point towards ar-

eas  where  the  focus  of  human  learning  is  concentrated  at  any  point  in  time,  and  as  such  they 

serve as a basis for a qualitative understanding of processes of techno-economic change and of 

income inequality. 

[177] 

Theories of periods and stages have been used in most of the social sciences. In the history 

profession the material from which Man’s tools were made (e.g. stone or bronze) has become 

universally accepted as the basis for establishing early historical periods: the Stone Age (Meso-

lithic, Neolithic), the Bronze Age. Other criteria could have been used, e.g. based on social or-

ganisation, but the technology variable was chosen. Not only in the history profession, but also 



Jürgen Backhaus (ed.) Karl Bücher, pages 177 to 222, 

of this volume. Page numbers indicated in brackets at 

end of original page.

 



 

2

in anthropology the idea that technology is an important determinant for society is an old one; 



the discussion of the relationship between irrigation and centralised government being a classical 

example.  In  political  science,  the  idea  of  stages  of  Man’s  development  is  born  –  with  Jean 

Bodin’s (1530-1596) study of the Republic – with the commencing of the science itself. If we 

define sociology as starting with Auguste Comte (1798-1857), the idea of stages was there from 

the very beginning of that science as well. In economics, theories of stages were central both to 

the  important  French  economist  and  statesman  Robert  Jacques  Turgot  (1727-1781)  and  in  the 

teachings  of  Adam  Smith  (1723-1790).  In  his  book  on  the  early  stage  theories  from  1750  to 

1800, Ronald Meek goes so far as to suggest that ‘there was a certain sense...in which the great 

eighteenth-century  systems  of  ‘classical’  political  economy  in  fact  arose  out  of  the  four  stage 

theories.’

1

 In spite of this, today any idea of economic stages is peripheral, almost alien, to the 



economics profession. In this paper we shall explore stage theories as they relate to economics, 

and discuss their usefulness from the point of view of understanding human welfare. 

Incipient ideas of stage theories are found in antiquity, both in Greece and in Rome. One may 

read Tacitus’ (55 ?– after 117 AD) Germania in such a way that ‘the relative degree of civilisa-

tion of the different German tribes depended upon the extent to which agriculture and pasturage, 

rather than hunting, preponderated in their mode of subsistence’.

2

 The idea of stages grew out of 



the idea of cycles, which in political history is an old one. Cycle theories are 

[178] given impor-

tance both by the influential Arab historian Ibn-Khaldun (1332-1406) and by Machiavelli (1469-

1527). With Jean Bodin, one of the path breakers of the Renaissance, comes the idea that histori-

cal cycles may have a cumulative and upward trend: the idea of progress. With Bodin, the idea 

of progressive stages is born as a child of the optimistic spirit of the Renaissance. Bodin at the 

same time discusses the embryonic nation-state (the Republic), its institutions, laws and taxation. 

Whereas Bodin puts much emphasis on geographical and climatic conditions, Francis Bacon 

(1561-1626), in his Novum Organum gives a different explanation when discussing the startling 

difference between the conditions of life in the various parts of the world. Bacon postulates that 

‘this difference comes not from soil, not from climate, not from race, but from the arts.’

3

 Bacon 


is probably the true founder of what we shall label the production-based and activity-specific 

theory of welfare. As we shall see, his idea that the material condition of a people is determined 

by its arts – i.e. by the professions exercised – is central to the 19the Century German and North 

American conflict with England over economic theory and industrial policy. 

During the Enlightenment, particularly between 1750 and 1800, stage theories were – so to 

say – at centre stage, particularly in England and France. During the expansion and geographical 

extension of industrial society from the 1840’s onwards, stage theories again became part of the 

economists’ toolbox – this time particularly in the US and in Germany. At the time, the funda-

mental changes which could be observed made it obvious that the world was entering a histori-

cal period that was qualitatively different from all previous ones. 

The  stage theories  born  during  the First  Industrial  Revolution  –  those of  Turgot  and  of  the 

early Adam Smith teaching in the 1750’s – follow Man first as a hunter and gatherer, then as a 

shepherd of domesticated animals, then as a farmer, finally to reach the stage of commerce. Most 

                                                           

1

  Meek,  Ronald,  Social  Science  and  the  Ignoble  Savage,  Cambridge,  Cambridge  University  Press,  1976,  p.  219. 



Emphasis in original.  

2

 Ibid.,p 12.  



3

 The Works of Francis Bacon, quoted in Meek, op. cit. p. 13.  





Yüklə 285,49 Kb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:
  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   13




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©genderi.org 2022
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə