Long-billed Curlew (Numenius americanus): a technical Conservation Assessment Prepared for the usda forest Service, Rocky Mountain Region, Species Conservation Project December 12, 2006 James A. Sedgwick



Yüklə 1,74 Mb.
Pdf görüntüsü
səhifə15/29
tarix17.11.2018
ölçüsü1,74 Mb.
#80481
1   ...   11   12   13   14   15   16   17   18   ...   29

24

25

often  forage  outside  of  territories,  and  broods  leave 



territories  after  hatching.  Curlews  quickly  disperse 

after  they  arrive  on  the  breeding  grounds  to  establish 

territories  in  suitable  habitat.  Returning  breeders 

establish territories with less agonistic interaction than 

first-time breeders do. After pairing, primarily the males 

defend  territory  boundaries  only  against  conspecifics. 

One  study  (Nebraska)  reported  that  some  breeders 

defended  a  feeding  territory  in  addition  to  a  nest 

territory (Bicak 1977). Territory size at Humboldt Bay, 

California averaged 3.0 ha ± 2.1 SD (range = 1.3–7.5, n 

= 8) in summer, with overlap averaging 28.5 percent ± 

29.7 SD (range = 1.3–88.1, n = 12; Mathis 2000).

Away  from  breeding  areas,  territoriality  has 

been  reported  for  intertidal  habitat;  territoriality  was 

not  observed  in  wet  pastures  (Dugger  and  Dugger 

2002).  Not  all  individuals  establish  territories  during 

migration  or  on  winter  areas. Territories  at  Humboldt 

Bay, California, which are occupied during winter and 

summer, averaged 2.4 ha ± 1.6 SD (range = 1.3–4.2, n = 

3), similar in size to summer territories (Mathis 2000).



Dispersal

Juvenile  curlews  may  move  extensively  after 

hatching.  One  brood  that  was  relocated  6  days  after 

banding  was  6.5  km  from  the  nest  site  (Sadler  and 

Maher  1976).  Curlew  chicks  fledge  at  38  to  45  days 

after hatching (King 1978, Allen 1980, Redmond and 

Jenni 1986) and depart the breeding grounds relatively 

early (most from mid-June to mid-August) and in small 

flocks, with no real evidence of fall staging (Campbell 

et al. 1990). During late summer and migration, flocks 

of 10 to 50 birds are common (range = 100–500) (Allen 

1980,  Renaud  1980,  Pampush  1981,  Campbell  et  al. 

1990, Roy 1996). Small migratory flocks in Utah during 

fall contain one or two adults and two to four juveniles, 

suggesting  that  family  groups  sometimes  migrate 

together (Paton and Dalton 1994).

There is little information on natal philopatry, but 

no birds marked as chicks were ever seen in subsequent 

years  on  breeding  areas  as  yearlings  (Redmond  and 

Jenni  1986).  Compared  to  females,  male  curlews  are 

more  likely  to  return  and  breed  (first  time)  near  the 

natal nest site (Redmond and Jenni 1982). Return rates 

of breeding adults (based on resighting data) over three 

years in Idaho were 89 percent ± 0.10 SD, 64 percent ± 

0.10 SD, and 0.84 percent ± 0.16 SD.

Source/sink, demographically linked 

populations

There  is  no  evidence  of  source-sink  dynamics 

in this species. Because there has been only one long-

term study of a marked population (Redmond and Jenni 

1986), and few recoveries of banded individuals, there 

is no information on the possible linkage of populations 

or metapopulation dynamics.

Factors limiting population growth

Curlew deaths have been reported from predators, 

disease,  and  contaminants.  There  are  no  mortalities 

reported  due  to  exposure,  but  the  impact  of  climate 

on  prey  abundance  and  availability  may  influence 

population growth. Decreased food availability—either 

on  breeding  areas  or  along  migration  routes  to  the 

south—is  presumed  to  be  responsible  for  interannual 

variation  in  clutch  size,  and  may  limit  population 

growth (Redmond and Jenni 1986).

With  the  exception  of  habitat  loss,  predation 

on  eggs  and  chicks  is  probably  the  single  greatest 

factor  limiting  population  growth.  Gopher  snakes 

(Pituophis spp.) and a variety of mammalian and avian 

predators  are  known  to  depredate  nests.  In  Idaho, 

28.6  percent  of  the  nests  were  destroyed  by  canids 

(coyote [Canis latrans], red fox [Vulpes vulpes], feral 

dog  [C.  familiaris]),  badgers  (Taxidea  taxis),  or  other 

undetermined mammals; 6.7 percent were destroyed by 

birds (primarily black-billed magpie [Pica hudsonia]); 

4.2 percent of nests were abandoned due to disturbance 

by  livestock  (n  =  119;  Redmond  and  Jenni  1986).  In 

Oregon, nest predators (including badger, coyote, and 

various corvids) destroyed 10 to 16 percent of 101 nests 

(Pampush  and  Anthony  1993).  Other  potential  nest 

predators include feral cat (Felis catus), striped skunk 

(Mephitis  mephitis),  raccoon  (Procyon  lotor),  and 

long-tailed weasel (Mustela frenata). Livestock destroy 

curlew nests by trampling (Dugger and Dugger 2002).

Predation  of  adult  long-billed  curlews  has  not 

been confirmed, but prairie falcons (Falco mexicanus

have  been  observed  making  unsuccessful  attempts  on 

curlews, and raptors took two radio-marked chicks in 

Idaho one week after they fledged (Redmond and Jenni 

1986).  During  one  year,  almost  all  chick  deaths  were 

attributed to raptors (a long-tailed weasel ate one chick) 

(Jenni et al. 1981).



24

25

Life cycle graph and model development

The  studies  of  Dugger  and  Dugger  (2002) 

provided the basis for formulating a life cycle graph for 

long-billed curlew that comprised two stages (censused 

at the fledgling stage and “adults”). The scanty data on 

survival suggested highest survival of yearlings (20 of 

30 males returning) and lower survival of older birds 

(5  of  12  returning). We  further  assumed  considerably 

lower  survival  in  the  first  year,  a  value  for  which  we 

solved  by  assuming  λ  (population  growth  rate)  was 

1.003. This “missing element” method (McDonald and 

Caswell 1993) is justified by the fact that, over the long 

term, λ must be near 1 or the species will go extinct or 

grow unreasonably large. In addition, we assumed that 

first-year  reproduction  was  lower  than  that  of  “adult” 

birds  (Table  1).  From  the  resulting  life  cycle  graphs 

(Figure 8), we produced a matrix population analysis 

with a post-breeding census for a birth-pulse population 

with a one-year census interval (McDonald and Caswell 

1993, Caswell 2001). The models had two kinds of input 

terms:  P

i

  describing  survival  rates  and  m



i

  describing 

number  of  female  fledglings  per  female  (Table  1). 

Figure  9a  and  Figure  9b  show  the  numeric  values 

for  the  matrix  corresponding  to  the  life  cycle  graph 

of Figure 8. The model assumes female demographic 

dominance so that, for example, fertilities are given as 

female offspring per female; thus, the fledgling number 

used was half the total annual production of fledglings, 

assuming a 1:1 sex ratio. Note also that the fertility terms 

(F

ij

) in the top row of the matrix include both a term for 



fledgling production (m

i

) and a term for the survival of 



the mother (P

i

) from the census (just after the breeding 



season) to the next birth pulse almost a year later. The 

population  growth  rate,  λ,  was  1.003,  based  on  the 

estimated vital rates used for the matrix. Although this 

suggests a stationary population, the value was used as 

an assumption for deriving a vital rate, and it should not 

be interpreted as an indication of the general well-being 

of the population. Other parts of the analysis provide a 

better guide for assessment.



Sensitivity analysis

A useful indication of the state of the population 

comes  from  the  sensitivity  and  elasticity  analyses. 

Table 1. Parameter values for the component terms (P

i

 and m



i

) that make up the vital rates in the projection matrix for 

long-billed curlew.

Parameter

Numeric value

Interpretation

m

1

1.4



Number of female fledglings produced by a first-year female

m

a

1.9



Number of female fledglings produced by an “adult” female

P

21

0.28



First-year survival rate

P

32

0.67



Second-year survival rate

P

a

0.42



Survival rate of “older adults”

P

21

m

1

1

2

3

P

21

P

32

P

a

P

a

m

a

P

32ma

Figure 8. Life cycle graph for long-billed curlew. The numbered circles (“nodes”) represent the three stages (first-

year birds, second-year birds and “older adults”). The arrows (“arcs”) connecting the nodes represent the vital rates 

– transitions between age-classes such as survival (P

ji

) or fertility (F



ij

) (the arcs pointing back toward the first node).





Yüklə 1,74 Mb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:
1   ...   11   12   13   14   15   16   17   18   ...   29




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©genderi.org 2022
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə