Long-billed Curlew (Numenius americanus): a technical Conservation Assessment Prepared for the usda forest Service, Rocky Mountain Region, Species Conservation Project December 12, 2006 James A. Sedgwick



Yüklə 1,74 Mb.
Pdf görüntüsü
səhifə16/29
tarix17.11.2018
ölçüsü1,74 Mb.
#80481
1   ...   12   13   14   15   16   17   18   19   ...   29

26

27

Sensitivity  is  the  effect  on  λ  of  an  absolute  change 



in  the  vital  rates  (a

ij

,  the  arcs  in  the  life  cycle  graph 



[Figure 8] and the cells in the matrix, A [Figure 9]). 

Sensitivity  analysis  provides  several  kinds  of  useful 

information  (see  Caswell  2001,  pp.  206–225).  First, 

sensitivities  show  how  important  a  given  vital  rate  is 

to λ, which Caswell (2001, pp. 280–298) has shown to 

be a useful integrative measure of overall fitness. One 

can  use  sensitivities  to  assess  the  relative  importance 

of  survival  (P

ij

)  and  fertility  (F



ij

)  transitions.  Second, 

sensitivities  can  be  used  to  evaluate  the  effects  of 

inaccurate estimation  of  vital  rates  from  field  studies. 

Inaccuracy will usually be due to a paucity of data, but 

it could also result from use of inappropriate estimation 

techniques  or  other  errors  of  analysis.  In  order  to 

improve the accuracy of the models, researchers should 

concentrate  additional  effort  on  transitions  with  large 

sensitivities. Third, sensitivities can quantify the effects 

of environmental perturbations, wherever those can be 

linked  to  effects  on  stage-specific  survival  or  fertility 

rates.  Fourth,  managers  can  concentrate  on  the  most 

important  transitions.  For  example,  they  can  assess 

which stages or vital rates are most critical to increasing 

the  population  growth  of  endangered  species  or  the 

“weak  links”  in  the  life  cycle  of  a  pest.  Figure  10 

shows the “possible sensitivities only” matrices for this 

analysis (one can calculate sensitivities for non-existent 

transitions, but these are usually either meaningless or 

biologically impossible – for example, the biologically 

impossible sensitivity of λ to the transition from Stage 2 

“adult” back to being a Stage 1 first-year bird).

The  summed  sensitivity  of  λ  to  changes  in 

survival  (65.2  percent  of  total  sensitivity  accounted 

for  by  survival  transitions)  was  greater  than  the 

summed  sensitivity  to  fertility  changes  (34.8  percent 

of  total).  The  single  transition  to  which  Stage  l  was 

most sensitive was first-year survival (47.4 percent of 

total). The second most important transition was first-

year  reproduction  (21.8  percent  of  total).  The  major 

conclusion from the sensitivity analysis is that survival 

rates  and  both  kinds  of  first-year  vital  rates  are  most 

important to population viability.



Elasticity analysis

Elasticities  are  useful  in  resolving  a  problem 

of  scale  that  can  affect  conclusions  drawn  from  the 

sensitivities. Interpreting sensitivities can be somewhat 

misleading  because  survival  rates  and  reproductive 

rates  are  measured  on  different  scales.  For  instance, 

an  absolute  change  of  0.5  in  survival  may  be  a  large 

alteration  (e.g.,  a  change  from  a  survival  rate  of  90 

percent to 40 percent). On the other hand, an absolute 

change of 0.5 in fertility may be a very small proportional 

alteration (e.g., a change from a clutch of 3,000 eggs to 

2,999.5  eggs).  Elasticities  are  the  sensitivities  of  λ  to 

proportional  changes  in  the  vital  rates  (a

ij

)  and  thus 



partly  avoid  the  problem  of  differences  in  units  of 

measurement (for example, we might reasonably equate 

changes  in  survival  rates  or  fertilities  of  1  percent). 

The  elasticities  have  the  useful  property  of  summing 

to 1.0. The difference between sensitivity and elasticity 

conclusions results from the weighting of the elasticities 

by the value of the original arc coefficients (the a

ij

 cells 



of the projection matrix). Management conclusions will 

depend on whether changes in vital rates are likely to 

be  absolute  (guided  by  sensitivities)  or  proportional 

(guided  by  elasticities).  By  using  elasticities,  one  can 

further assess key life history transitions and stages as 

well as the relative importance of reproduction (F

ij

) and 


survival (P

ij

) for a given species. It is important to note 



1

2

3



1

0.393


1.27

0.796


2

0.28


3

0.67


0.42

1

2



3

1

P

21

m

1

P

32

m

a

P

a

m

a

2



P

21

3



P

32

P

a

Figure 9a. Symbolic values for the projection matrix of vital rates, A (with cells a

ij

) corresponding to the long-billed 



curlew life cycle graph of Figure 8. Meanings of the component terms and their numeric values are given in Table 

1.

Figure 9b. Numeric values for the projection matrix of vital rates, A (with cells a

ij

) corresponding to the long-billed 



curlew life cycle graph of Figure 8.


26

27

that elasticity as well as sensitivity analysis assumes that 



the  magnitude  of  changes  (perturbations)  to  the  vital 

rates  is  small.  Large  changes  require  a  reformulated 

matrix and reanalysis.

Figure  11  shows  elasticities  for  the  long-billed 

curlew.  λ  was  most  elastic  to  changes  in  first-year 

survival  (e

21

  =  29.7  percent  of  total  elasticity).  Next 



most  elastic  were  first-  and  second-year  reproduction 

(e

11

 = 19.1 percent; e



12

 = 17.3 percent of total elasticity). 

Survival of older birds was relatively unimportant (e

12

 



=  17.3  percent  of  total  elasticity).  The  sensitivities 

and  elasticities  for  long-billed  curlew  were  generally 

consistent  in  emphasizing  first-year  transitions.  Thus, 

first-year transitions, particularly survival rates, are the 

data elements that warrant careful monitoring in order 

to refine the matrix demographic analysis.



Other demographic parameters

The  stable  stage  distribution  (SSD;  Table  2

describes  the  proportion  of  each  stage  or  age-class 

in  a  population  at  demographic  equilibrium.  Under 

a  deterministic  model,  any  unchanging  matrix  will 

converge  on  a  population  structure  that  follows  the 

stable  age  distribution,  regardless  of  whether  the 

population is declining, stationary, or increasing. Under 

most  conditions,  populations  not  at  equilibrium  will 

converge to the SSD within 20 to 100 census intervals. 

For long-billed curlew at the time of the post-breeding 

annual census (just after the end of the breeding season), 

fledglings  represent  62.6  percent  of  the  population, 

yearlings (second-year birds) represent 17.4 percent of 

the population, and older birds represent 20 percent of 

the population. Reproductive values (Table 3) can be 

thought of as describing the value of a stage as a seed for 

population growth relative to that of the first (newborn 

or,  in  this  case,  fledgling)  stage  (Caswell  2001).  The 

reproductive value is calculated as a weighted sum of 

the  present  and  future  reproductive  output  of  a  stage 

discounted  by  the  probability  of  surviving  (Williams 

1966). The reproductive value of the first stage is, by 

definition, 1.0. A second-year female individual (Stage 

2) is “worth” 2.2 fledglings, and older females are worth 

1.4 fledglings. The second-year females are the core of 

the population under this model. The cohort generation 

time for this species was 2.1 years (SD = 1.1 years).



Stochastic model

We  conducted  a  stochastic  matrix  analysis  for 

long-billed  curlew.  We  incorporated  stochasticity 

in  several  ways  (Table  4),  by  varying  different 

combinations of vital rates, and by varying the amount 

of  stochastic  fluctuation.  We  varied  the  amount  of 

fluctuation  by  changing  the  standard  deviation  of  the 

truncated  random  normal  distribution  from  which  the 

stochastic vital rates were selected. To model high levels 

of stochastic fluctuation, we used a standard deviation 

of one quarter of the “mean” (with this “mean” set at the 

value of the original matrix entry [vital rate], a

ij

 under 


the deterministic analysis). Under Case 1, we subjected 

all  the  fertility  arcs  (F

11

,  F



12

,  and  F

13

)  to  high  levels 



of  stochastic  fluctuations  (SD  one  quarter  of  mean). 

Under  Case  2,  we  varied  all  the  survival  arcs  (P

21



P



32

 and P

33

) with high levels of stochasticity (SD one 



quarter of mean). Under Case 3, we varied the first-year 

transitions (P

21

 and F



11

) with high levels of stochastic 

fluctuation. In Case 4, we varied those same first-year 

transitions, but with only half the stochastic fluctuations 

(SD one eighth of mean). Each run consisted of 2,000 

census  intervals  (years)  beginning  with  a  population 

1

2

3



1

0.489


0.136

0.157


2

1.065


3

0.186


0.214

1

2



3

1

0.191



0.173

0.125


2

0.297


3

0.125


0.09

Figure 10. Possible sensitivities only matrix, S

p

 (blank cells correspond to zeros in the original matrix, A). The λ of 



long-billed curlew is most sensitive to changes in first-year survival (Cell s

21

 = 1.065).and first-year fertility (Cell s



11

 

= 0.489).



Figure 11. Elasticity matrix, E (remainder of matrix consists of zeros). The elasticities have the property of summing 

to 1.0. The λ of long-billed curlew is most elastic to changes in first-year survival (e

21

 = 0.297), followed by first- and 



second-year fertility (e

11

 = 0.191, e



12

 = 0.173).





Yüklə 1,74 Mb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:
1   ...   12   13   14   15   16   17   18   19   ...   29




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©genderi.org 2022
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə