Long-billed Curlew (Numenius americanus): a technical Conservation Assessment Prepared for the usda forest Service, Rocky Mountain Region, Species Conservation Project December 12, 2006 James A. Sedgwick



Yüklə 1,74 Mb.
Pdf görüntüsü
səhifə17/29
tarix17.11.2018
ölçüsü1,74 Mb.
#80481
1   ...   13   14   15   16   17   18   19   20   ...   29

28

29

Table 4. Results of four cases of different stochastic projections for long-billed curlew. Stochastic fluctuations have 

the greatest effect when acting on first-year transitions (Case 3).

Case 1

Case 2

Case 3

Case 4

Input factors:

Affected cells

All the F

ij

All the P



ij

P

21

 and F



11

(first year)



P

21

 and F



11

(first year)

S.D. of random normal distribution

1/4


1/4

1/4


1/8

Output values:

Deterministic λ

1.003

1.003


1.003

1.003


# Extinctions/100 trials

1

3



3

0

Mean extinction time



1,667

1,445


1,445

N.a.


# Declines/# survived pop

34/99


56/97

62/97


3/100

Mean ending population size

5.6 X 10

6

461,697



185,499

3.9 X 10


6

Standard deviation

4.6 X 10

7

2.5 X 10



6

533,737


1.0 X 10

7

Median ending population size



26,204

3,405


2,544

815,138


Log λ

s

0.0004



-0.0005

-0.0011


0.002

λ

s



1.0004

0.9995


0.9989

1.002


% reduction in λ

0.26


0.35

0.4


0.09

Table 3. Reproductive values (left eigenvector). Reproductive values can be thought of as describing the “value” 

of an age class as a seed for population growth relative to that of the first (newborn or, in this case, fledgling) stage. 

The reproductive value of the first age-class or stage is, by definition, 1.0. The peak reproductive value (second-year 

females) is highlighted.



Age Class

Description

Reproductive value

1

Fledglings/first-year females



1.0

2

Second-year females



2.2

3

“Older adult” females



1.4

Table 2. Stable age distribution (right eigenvector). At the census, 63 percent of the individuals in the population 

should be fledglings. An additional 17 percent will be yearlings (females beginning their second year). The rest will 

be “older adult” females in their third year or older.

Stage

Description

Proportion

Mean age (± SD) Variant 1

1

Fledglings (to yearling)



0.63

0 ± 0


2

Second-year females

0.17

1 ± 0


3

“Older adult” females

0.20

2.7 ± 1.1



size  of  10,000  distributed  according  to  the  SSD  of 

the  deterministic  model.  Beginning  at  the  SSD  helps 

to  avoid  the  effects  of  transient,  non-equilibrium 

dynamics. The overall simulation consisted of 100 runs 

(each with 2,000 cycles). We calculated the stochastic 

growth rate, logλ

S

, according to Eqn. 14.61 of Caswell 



(2001), after discarding the first 1,000 cycles in order to 

further avoid transient dynamics.

The  stochastic  model  (Table  4)  produced  two 

major  results.  First,  only  high  levels  of  stochastic 

fluctuations had appreciable detrimental effects. Low-

level stochastic fluctuations (Case 4, SD of one eighth) 

resulted  in  no  extinctions  and  only  three  declines. 

Second,  varying  the  first-year  transitions  had  the 

greatest  detrimental  effects  (Case  3,  three  extinctions 

and 65 declines). The difference in the effects of which 

arc was most important is predictable largely from the 

elasticities. λ was most elastic to changes in the first-

year transitions. This detrimental effect of stochasticity 

occurs despite the fact that the average vital rates remain 

the same as under the deterministic model - the random 

selections  are  from  a  symmetrical  distribution.  This 

apparent paradox is due to the lognormal distribution of 

stochastic ending population sizes (Caswell 2001). The 

lognormal distribution has the property that the mean 



28

29

exceeds  the  median,  which  exceeds  the  mode.  Any 



particular realization will therefore be most likely to end 

at a population size considerably lower than the initial 

population size. These results indicate that populations 

of  long-billed  curlew  are  somewhat  vulnerable  to 

stochastic fluctuations in first-year survival or fertility 

(due,  for  example,  to  annual  climatic  variation  or  to 

human disturbance) when the magnitude of fluctuations 

is  high.  Nevertheless,  the  relatively  even  elasticity 

values  (Figure  11)  in  the  life  cycle  of  long-billed 

curlews may, to some extent, help buffer them against 

environmental  stochasticity.  Pfister  (1998)  showed 

that  for  a  wide  range  of  empirical  life  histories,  high 

sensitivity or elasticity was negatively correlated with 

high rates of temporal variation. That is, most species 

appear to have responded to strong selection by having 

low  variability  for  sensitive  transitions  in  their  life 

cycles. Long-billed curlews, however, may have little 

flexibility in reducing variability in first-year transition 

rates.  Variable  early  survival,  and  perhaps  fertility,  is 

likely to be the rule rather than the exception.



Potential refinements of the models

Clearly,  improved  data  on  survival  rates  and 

age-specific  fertilities  are  needed  in  order  to  increase 

confidence  in  any  demographic  analysis.  The  most 

important “missing data elements” in the life history for 

long-billed curlew are for first-year transitions, which 

emerge as vital rates to which λ is most sensitive as well 

as  most  elastic.  Data  from  natural  populations  on  the 

range of variability in the vital rates would allow more 

realistic functions to model stochastic fluctuations. For 

example, time series based on actual temporal or spatial 

variability  would  allow  construction  of  a  series  of 

“stochastic” matrices that mirrored actual variation. One 

advantage of such a series would be the incorporation of 

observed correlations between variations in vital rates. 

Using  observed  correlations  would  improve  on  our 

“uncorrelated” assumption by incorporating forces that 

we  did  not  consider.  Those  forces  may  drive  greater 

positive  or  negative  correlation  among  life  history 

traits. Other potential refinements include incorporating 

density-dependent  effects. At  present,  the  data  appear 

insufficient  to  assess  reasonable  functions  governing 

density dependence.

Summary  of  major  conclusions  from  matrix 

projection models:

v

   Survival accounts for 65 percent of the total 



“possible” sensitivity, with first-year survival 

as  the  most  important  (47  percent  of  total) 

followed  by  first-year  fertility  (22  percent 

of  total). Any  absolute  changes  in  first-year 

rates will have major impacts on population 

dynamics.

v

   First-year  survival  (e



21

  =  30  percent)  and 

first-year fertility (e

11

 = 19 percent) account 



for  almost  40  percent  of  the  total  elasticity. 

Proportional  changes  in  first-year  transition 

rates will have a major impact on population 

dynamics.

v

   The  reproductive  value  of  “older”  females 



is  relatively  low.  Thus  yearling  females 

appear to be the key reservoir of population 

dynamics under the model formulated here.

v

   Stochastic  simulations  echoed  the  elasticity 



analyses  in  emphasizing  the  importance  of 

first-year survival and fertility to population 

dynamics. In comparison to life histories of 

other vertebrates, long-billed curlews appear 

slightly  less  vulnerable  to  environmental 

stochasticity (because of the buffering effect 

of  a  relatively  even  importance  of  different 

vital  rates,  as  assessed  by  the  sensitivities 

and elasticities).

Community ecology



Predators and habitat use

Predator response to grazing or to fragmentation 

of  prairie  habitats  and  how  this  might  influence 

reproductive  success  of  long-billed  curlews  have  not 

been studied. Trees are not a historical element of the 

mixed-grass and shortgrass prairie landscapes, and their 

presence  (e.g.,  plantings,  treerows,  windbreaks)  may 

result in increased predation by providing perches for 

avian predators such as magpies, ravens, and raptors.

Parasites and disease

Aspergillosis  killed  15  percent  (two  of  13)  of 

prefledglings  during  one  season  in  Idaho  (Redmond 

and  Jenni  1986).  Three  species  of  lice  from  curlews 

were  reported  in  Texas  and  New  Mexico  studies 

(Cummingsiella  longistricola,  Lunaceps  numenii 



numenii,  and  Austromenopon  crocatum;  Wilson 

1937,  Butler  and  Pfaffenberger  1981).  Other  records 

of  ectoparasites  include  a  chigger  (Toritrombicula 

dupliseta;  Loomis  1966)  and  a  species  of  louse 

(Cummingsiella ovalis; Malcomson 1960).





Yüklə 1,74 Mb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:
1   ...   13   14   15   16   17   18   19   20   ...   29




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©genderi.org 2022
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə