Long-billed Curlew (Numenius americanus): a technical Conservation Assessment Prepared for the usda forest Service, Rocky Mountain Region, Species Conservation Project December 12, 2006 James A. Sedgwick



Yüklə 1,74 Mb.
Pdf görüntüsü
səhifə20/29
tarix17.11.2018
ölçüsü1,74 Mb.
#80481
1   ...   16   17   18   19   20   21   22   23   ...   29

Figur

e 12c. 

Predators/competitors centrum of the long-billed curlew envirogram.



Web 4 

     Web 3 

 Web 2 

         Web 1 

 

CENTRUM  

P

re

da

to

rs

/C

om

pe

ti

to

rs

 

 



 

 

Topography



w

at

er



/w

ea

th



er

ve

ge



ta

tio


n

m

ic



ro

ha

bi



ta

 



     

av

ia



n,

 c

an



id

, c


or

vi



        p

re

da



tio

 



 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

W



at

er

/w



ea

th

er



 

 

ve



ge

ta

tio



n

in

se



ct

s/

ea



rt

hw

or



m

s_

__



 sm

all m


am

m

al                       



|

     a


bu

nd

an



ce

  

 



 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 



W

at

er



/w

ea

th



er

 

 



ve

ge

ta



tio

n

in



se

ct

s/



ea

rt

hw



or

m



     

co

m



pe

tit


io

n f


ro

m

 



 

|

     a



vi

an

  



 

 



     c

om

pe



tit

or

s  



 

|

Long-billed curlew 




34

35

Grazing



The  major  historical  threat  to  long-billed 

curlews  was  the  removal  of  primary,  native  grazers 

(i.e.,  bison  [Bison  bison],  pronghorn  [Antilocapra 

americana],  and  prairie  dogs),  which  has  altered 

the  mixed-grass  and  shortgrass  prairies  from  the 

once-heterogeneous,  patchy  grassland  landscape  that 

resulted  from  the  intense,  uneven  grazing  by  these 

species.  Today  cattle  and  sheep  have  replaced  bison, 

but  they  do  not  mimic  the  historical  grazing  patterns 

of  these  native  herbivores.

Because  long-billed  curlews  are  found  across 

such a wide range of climate regimes, from more xeric 

in the southern parts of their range to more mesic in the 

north,  the  grassland  prairie  systems  that  they  occupy 

express a similar diversity in plant species composition 

and  variety,  in  vegetation  height  and  density,  and  in 

growth form. As a result, one might expect a congruent 

variation,  from  xeric  to  mesic,  in  plant  species’ 

response to grazing and in grazing impacts on curlew 

habitats.  Optimal  grazing  intensity  and  appropriate 

grazing  regimes  vary  according  to  prairie  type  and 

climate regimes.

Grazing  generally  enhances  curlew  breeding 

habitats  because  it  produces  the  short  grass  and  open 

ground  that  curlews  favor  for  predator  detection  and 

chick mobility (e.g., King 1978, Pampush 1980, Jenni 

et al. 1981, Bicak et al. 1982, Cochrane and Anderson 

1987,  Hooper  and  Pitt  1996).  In  the  Northern  Great 

Plains,  highest  curlew  densities  occurred  in  lightly 

grazed  grasslands  on  dry  soils,  and  in  heavily  grazed 

areas on moister soils (Kantrud and Kologiski 1982). In 

Idaho, curlew numbers were positively correlated with 

grazing intensity (Bicak et al. 1982), and breeding was 

never observed on rangeland that had not been grazed in 

the previous 12 months (Jenni et al. 1981). In Nebraska, 

curlews were only observed on grazed areas (Cole and 

Sharpe 1976) and only in summer-grazed fields (Bicak 

1977). In British Columbia, highest breeding densities 

occurred on sites where spring grazing levels averaged 

1.4  animal  units  per  ha  (Hooper  and  Pitt  1996).  In 

habitats  with  dense  stands  of  perennial  bunchgrass, 

sheep  are  better  at  trampling  residual  vegetation  and 

creating  appropriate  breeding  habitat  than  cattle  are 

(Jenni et al. 1981, Bicak et al. 1982). In southwestern 

Idaho, areas grazed by sheep alone or sheep and cattle 

had higher densities of curlews than did areas grazed by 

cattle alone (Bicak et al. 1982). A year-round grazing 

schedule  was  least  attractive  to  breeding  curlews  in 

Idaho,  and  rest-rotation  systems  that  rested  pastures 

from  March  through  May  were  also  detrimental 

(Redmond  and  Jenni  1982).  The  best  rotation  system 

included  grazing  through  early  spring,  so  vegetation 

height and density were low during courtship and egg 

laying (Jenni et al. 1981).

Overgrazing in drier, shortgrass habitats may be 

a threat to long-billed curlews and should be avoided 

(Strong  1971,  Bock  et  al.  1993, Anstey  et  al.  1995). 

Areas  where  vegetation  is  already  sparse  and  short 

from overgrazing should be protected to improve their 

condition  (Oberholser  1974).  Grazing  in  more  mesic, 

mixed-grass  habitats  may  benefit  long-billed  curlews 

(Kantrud and Kologiski 1982, Messmer 1990). Mixed-

grass areas or areas where the grass is too tall or thick 

can be made suitable for breeding long-billed curlews 

by  implementing  moderate  grazing  (Dechant  et  al. 

2003).  Grazing  moister  areas  will  increase  vegetation 

diversity and patchiness and reduce tall, thick vegetation 

(Kantrud and Kologiski 1982). In such habitats, some 

grazing appears to benefit this species.

Fire and fire suppression

The  fragmentation  of  the  mixed-grass  and 

shortgrass  prairies  by  agricultural  conversion  has 

prevented extensive, uncontrolled wildfires, and those 

that do occur are often contained to the smallest area 

possible (Bent 1929, Samson and Knopf 1994, Risser 

1996). Long-billed curlews may benefit from wildfires 

on  grassland  habitats  during  late  summer  (Cannings 

1999).  Burning  can  improve  habitat  for  curlews  by 

removing  shrubs  and  increasing  habitat  openness 

(Pampush  and  Anthony  1993).  Fire  suppression  may 

negatively  affect  breeding  habitat  by  allowing  forest 

encroachment  and  growth  of  tall  grasses  and  shrubs 

(Cannings 1999). During the breeding season following 

a  fall  range  fire,  there  was  a  30  percent  increase  in 

estimated  curlew  breeding  density  in  western  Idaho 

(Redmond and Jenni 1986). Plant succession following 

fire can be rapid, so grazing or mowing must also be 

used  to  maintain  burned  areas  as  attractive  breeding 

habitat for curlews (Jenni et al. 1981).

Exotic species

Early attempts to rehabilitate grasslands included 

seeding  with  exotic  crested  wheatgrasses  imported 

from Siberia and planting trees to control wind erosion 

(implemented by the Civilian Conservation Corp from 

1938  to  1941)  (Samson  and  Knopf  1994).  Prairie 

restoration  efforts  that  seeded  degraded  grasslands 

with taller, exotic grasses have reduced habitat quality 

for grassland nesting birds (Samson and Knopf 1994). 

Throughout their range, long-billed curlews prefer native 





Yüklə 1,74 Mb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:
1   ...   16   17   18   19   20   21   22   23   ...   29




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©genderi.org 2022
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə