Long-billed Curlew (Numenius americanus): a technical Conservation Assessment Prepared for the usda forest Service, Rocky Mountain Region, Species Conservation Project December 12, 2006 James A. Sedgwick



Yüklə 1,74 Mb.
Pdf görüntüsü
səhifə22/29
tarix17.11.2018
ölçüsü1,74 Mb.
#80481
1   ...   18   19   20   21   22   23   24   25   ...   29

36

37

declines  in  numbers  prior  to  the  initiation  of  the 



BBS,  habitat  losses  to  agriculture  and  development, 

and  concerns  over  habitat  fragmentation,  the  species 

is  listed  as  a  species  of  management  concern  by  a 

variety of conservation organizations (see Management 

Status and History). Additionally, Region 2 added the 

long-billed curlew to its Regional Forester’s Sensitive 

Species List in 2003.

The  long-billed  curlew  is  a  native  prairie 

specialist,  restricted  to  mixed-grass  and  shortgrass 

prairies,  and  preservation  and  proper  management  of 

these habitats remain key to its conservation. Viability 

of  this  species  could  be  impaired  throughout  Region 

2 by continued fragmentation of habitats, which have 

altered natural expanses of mixed-grass and shortgrass 

prairies  to  a  mosaic  of  pastures  variably  grazed  by 

cattle  and  fragmented  by  agricultural  activities  and 

human  development  (O’Connor  et  al.  1999).  Current 

management does not appear to be placing demands on 

the species, with the following major caveats:

v

  shortgrass  and  mixed-grass  prairies  must  be 



grazed at appropriate levels

v

  prescribed  burns  may  be  necessary  to 



maintain  vegetation  stature  and  reduce  the 

shrub component on native prairies

v

  the  long-term  effects  (i.e.,  fragmentation, 



disturbance,  habitat  loss)  of  oil  and  gas 

development  on  curlew  populations  are 

unknown and have not been investigated.

Because much of the long-billed curlew range falls 

within Region 2 and because this species is restricted to 

shortgrass and mixed-grass prairies, risks in Region 2 

parallel  continent-wide  risks.  Continued  conversion 

of  shortgrass  and  mixed-grass  prairies  to  cropland, 

fragmentation  of  curlew  habitats,  indiscriminant  use 

of pesticides, prairie fire suppression, and oil and gas 

development all put the long-billed curlew at risk.

Management of Long-billed Curlews in 

Region 2

Implications and potential conservation 

elements

Long-billed  curlews  prefer  vast  areas  of  native, 

undisturbed,  unfragmented  prairie,  where  native 

herbivores  (i.e.,  bison,  pronghorn,  prairie  dogs)  and 

domestic  cattle  combine  to  mimic  historical  grazing 

patterns, and where uncontrolled wildfire or prescribed 

burning  are  used  to  mirror  historical  fire  regimes. 

Preferred environmental conditions include:

v

  native grasslands, usually a mix of short and 



mixed-grasses

v

  open areas of vegetation low in height



v

  moist, low areas with taller, thicker grasses in 

shortgrass prairies

v

  a preference for grazed areas in mixed-grass 



prairies

v

  limited cover of shrubs



v

  an average vegetation height <30 cm

v

  no tall exotic grasses



v

  no trees.

To replicate the native, historic prairie condition, 

two primary management tools are available: prescribed 

fire and grazing by cattle. Both of these tools can help 

to create and maintain the vegetation profile favored by 

this species on breeding and wintering grounds.

Fire


The  fragmentation  of  the  mixed-grass  and 

shortgrass  prairies  by  agricultural  conversion  has 

prevented  uncontrolled  wildfires,  and  those  that  do 

occur are often contained to the smallest area possible 

(Bent 1968). Fire may serve in maintaining the stature 

of  curlew  breeding  habitat  (Bent  1968,  Oberholser 

1974).  Prescribed  burns  can  be  used  in  shortgrass  to 

remove  woody  vegetation,  cactus,  and  accumulated 

litter and to improve grazing conditions for livestock, 

but the grasses recover slowly, requiring 2 to 3 years 

with normal precipitation (Wright and Bailey 1980).

Grazing


Grazing can be beneficial to curlews if it provides 

suitably  short  vegetation,  particularly  during  the  pre-

laying period (Bicak et al. 1982, Cochran and Anderson 

1987).  Timing  and  intensity  of  grazing  treatments 

should  be  adjusted  according  to  local  climate  and 

habitat  characteristics  (Bicak  et  al.  1982,  Bock  et  al. 

1993).  Curlews  prefer  grazed  prairie,  but  they  will 

forage and occasionally even nest in cropland, including 

fallow fields, forage crops, and grain crops (McCallum 

et al. 1977, Pampush 1980, Renaud 1980, Cochran and 




36

37

Anderson 1987, Pampush and Anthony 1993). Grazing 



during  breeding  can  result  in  destruction  of  eggs  or 

entire clutches by trampling (4.2 percent of 119 nests; 

Redmond and Jenni 1986). In Wyoming, nests in areas 

that were grazed during the incubation period had lower 

hatching  success  rates  than  nests  in  ungrazed  areas 

(Cochran  and  Anderson  1987).  However,  only  very 

heavy  grazing  would  result  in  a  significant  source  of 

nest loss (Redmond and Jenni 1986).

Cultivation, seeding, exotics

Long-billed  curlews  prefer  native  grasslands 

to  non-native  pastureland  seeded  with  exotics.  Older 

plantings  of  crested  wheatgrass  and  infestation  of 

knapweeds  can  severely  degrade  nesting  habitat  by 

creating  dense,  tall  stands  of  vegetation.  Conversely, 

because  of  its  sparse,  open  growth  characteristics, 

cheatgrass  appears  to  provide  better  nesting  habitat 

than  natural  bunchgrass  habitats  (Allen  1980,  Jenni 

et  al.  1981,  Pampush  and  Anthony  1993).  In  some 

areas,  numbers  of  breeding  curlews  have  increased 

in  response  to  invasion  by  cheatgrass.  Agricultural 

cropland  (e.g.,  hay  meadows,  alfalfa,  some  cereal 

grains)  also  may  benefit  curlews  in  some  regions 

(Idaho,  Jenni  et  al.  1981;  Wyoming,  Cochrane  and 

Anderson 1987; Oregon, Pampush and Anthony 1993). 

Haying  can  be  used  to  provide  the  short  vegetation 

preferred by nesting curlews, but it should be timed so 

that short vegetation is available early in the season and 

active nests are not damaged (Cochran and Anderson 

1987).  In  north-central  Oregon,  curlews  foraged  in 

alfalfa  fields  as  long  as  vegetation  remained  <30  cm 

tall (Pampush 1980, Pampush and Anthony 1993). On 

the other hand, they will occupy former breeding areas 

when  croplands  are  restored  to  grasslands  (Yocum 

1956). Trees are not a historical element of the mixed-

grass  or  shortgrass  prairie  landscapes,  and  trees  (e.g., 

plantings, treerows) may result in increased predation 

by  providing  perches  for  avian  predators  such  as 

magpies, ravens, and raptors.

Tools and practices

Population or habitat management approaches 

and their effectiveness

The historical impact of grazing by bison, prairie 

dogs, and pronghorn as an ecological force established 

the  precedent  of  manipulating  cattle  grazing  as  the 

primary  wildlife  habitat  management  tool  for  mixed-

grass  and  shortgrass  prairies.  The  key  management 

goal  for  long-billed  curlews  is  to  provide  adequate 

size  blocks  of  short-  to  medium-height  grassland. 

Mixed-grass areas or areas where the grass is too tall 

or thick can be made suitable for breeding long-billed 

curlews  by  implementing  moderate  grazing  (Dechant 

et  al.  2003).  Burning  and  heavy  grazing  by  livestock 

reduces  vegetation  coverage  and  density,  improving 

habitat; however, these practices must be conducted at 

the right time of year. Areas where vegetation is already 

sparse and short from overgrazing should be protected, 

especially  in  areas  of  low  precipitation.  Prescribed 

prairie burns may be appropriate for historically burned 

areas where fire has been suppressed. New construction 

for oil and gas exploration, wind-power development, 

and water well drilling should be restricted during the 

breeding season; this is already done in some areas of 

Colorado, Wyoming, and Utah (Knopf 1996).

Management  approaches  that  benefit  the  long-

billed  curlew  and  address  the  factors  that  place  this 

species at risk include:

v

  protect  prairie  areas  from  plowing  and 



cultivation.

v

  provide large blocks of suitable habitat; blocks 



should be ≥ 3 times as large as territories (~14 

ha; Redmond et al. 1981)

v

  provide  areas  of  adequate  size  to  support 



multiple long-billed curlew territories

v

  delay grazing until after the breeding season 



(~15  July),  and  avoid  grazing  during  the 

incubation period

v

  Use  light  grazing  and  occasional  prescribed 



burning  to  maintain  vertical  vegetation 

structure

v

  Remove tall, dense residual vegetation before 



the pre-laying period (March to April) so that 

adults do not have to leave their territories to 

forage (Redmond 1986)

v

  implement  prescribed  burns  where  fire  will 



improve habitat by reducing shrub coverage 

and  increasing  habitat  openness  (Redmond 

and Jenni 1986, Pampush and Anthony 1993)

v

  avoid  grasshopper  control;  adopt  integrated 



pest  management  practices  to  retain  some 

populations of prey species

v

  maintain a landscape mosaic with vegetation 



of different heights and densities to provide 



Yüklə 1,74 Mb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:
1   ...   18   19   20   21   22   23   24   25   ...   29




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©genderi.org 2022
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə