Long-billed Curlew (Numenius americanus): a technical Conservation Assessment Prepared for the usda forest Service, Rocky Mountain Region, Species Conservation Project December 12, 2006 James A. Sedgwick



Yüklə 1,74 Mb.
Pdf görüntüsü
səhifə5/29
tarix17.11.2018
ölçüsü1,74 Mb.
#80481
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   29

8

9

Scope

This  assessment  examines  the  biology,  ecology, 

conservation,  and  management  of  the  long-billed 

curlew  with  specific  reference  to  the  geographic  and 

ecological characteristics of the USFS Rocky Mountain 

Region. Although some of the literature on the species 

originates  from  field  investigation  outside  the  region, 

this  document  places  that  literature  in  the  ecological 

and  social  context  of  Region  2.  Similarly,  this 

assessment  is  concerned  with  reproductive  behavior, 

population  dynamics,  and  other  characteristics  of 

long-billed  curlew  in  the  context  of  the  current 

environment.  The  evolutionary  environment  of  the 

species is considered in conducting the syntheses, but 

placed in a current context.

In producing the assessment, I reviewed refereed 

literature,  non-refereed  publications,  research  reports, 

and  data  accumulated  by  resource  management 

agencies.  Not  all  publications  on  long-billed  curlew 

are referenced in the assessment, nor were all published 

materials  considered  equally  reliable.  The  assessment 

emphasizes  refereed  literature  because  this  is  the 

accepted standard in science. Non-refereed publications 

or  reports  were  used  when  refereed  information  was 

unavailable,  but  these  were  regarded  with  greater 

skepticism.  Unpublished  data  (e.g.,  Natural  Heritage 

Program  records)  were  important  in  estimating  the 

geographic  distribution  of  this  species.  These  data 

required  special  attention  because  of  the  diversity  of 

persons and methods used in their collection.

Treatment of Uncertainty

Science  represents  a  rigorous,  systematic 

approach  to  obtaining  knowledge.  Competing  ideas 

regarding  how  the  world  works  are  measured  against 

observations.  However,  because  our  descriptions  of 

the world are always incomplete and our observations 

are limited, science focuses on approaches for dealing 

with  uncertainty.  A  commonly  accepted  approach  to 

science is based on a progression of critical experiments 

to  develop  strong  inference  (Platt  1964).  However,  it 

is  difficult  to  conduct  experiments  that  produce  clean 

results in the ecological sciences. Often, we must rely 

on observations, inference, good thinking, and models 

to  guide  our  understanding  of  ecological  relations.  In 

this  assessment,  I  note  the  strength  of  evidence  for 

particular  ideas,  and  describe  alternative  explanations 

where appropriate.

Publication of Assessment on the World 

Wide Web

To  facilitate  the  use  of  species  conservation 

assessments, they are being published on the Region 2 

World Wide Web site (http://www.fs.fed.us/r2/projects/

scp).  Placing  the  documents  on  the  Web  makes  them 

available  to  agency  managers  and  biologists,  and  the 

public  more  rapidly  than  publishing  them  as  reports. 

More  importantly,  Web  publication  will  facilitate 

updating  and  revising  the  assessments,  which  will 

be  accomplished  based  on  protocols  established  by 

Region 2.

Peer Review

In  keeping  with  the  standards  of  scientific 

publication,  assessments  developed  for  the  Species 

Conservation Project have been externally peer reviewed 

prior to their release on the Web. This assessment was 

reviewed through a process administered by the Society 

for Conservation Biology, which chose two recognized 

experts (on this or related taxa) to provide critical input 

on the manuscript.

M

ANAGEMENT 

S

TATUS AND 

N

ATURAL 

H

ISTORY

Management Status

Long-billed curlews are endemic breeding birds 

of the mixed-grass and shortgrass prairies of the Great 

Plains. Although  the  species  is  not  federally  listed  or 

a  candidate  for  listing  under  the  Endangered  Species 

Act,  a  decline  in  abundance  on  both  the  breeding 

and  wintering  grounds,  has  lead  to  the  following 

conservation status rankings:

v

  Natural Heritage Program (NHP) global rank 



of G5 (globally secure, but indication of long-

term population declines)

v

  USDA  Forest  Service  Region  2  Sensitive 



Species

v

  Bureau  of  Land  Management  sensitive 



species  rankings  of  1  (under  status  review 

by  U.S.  Fish  and  Wildlife  Service)  and  3 

(typically small and dispersed populations)



8

9

v



  U.S.  Fish  and  Wildlife  Service  (USFWS) 

Bird  of  Conservation  Concern  throughout 

its  breeding  and  wintering  ranges  (ranked 

nationally in USFWS Regions 1, 2, 4, and 6, 

and in all Bird Conservation Regions where 

the  species  occurs)  (U.S.  Fish  and  Wildlife 

Service 2002)

v

  Partners  in  Flight  (PIF)  Species Assessment 



Breeding  Scores  of  20  (moderately  high 

priority)  and  24  (significant  declines)  for 

the  Wyoming  Basin  and  Central  Shortgrass 

Prairie  physiographic  areas  (S86  and  S36), 

respectively

v

  PIF priority bird species in northern shortgrass 



prairie  (Wyoming,  Montana;  physiographic 

area 39), central shortgrass prairie (Colorado; 

physiographic  area  36),  Pecos  and  Staked 

Plains (eastern New Mexico, western Texas; 

physiographic  area  55),  central  mixed-grass 

prairie  (Nebraska;  physiographic  area  34), 

Columbia  Plateau  shrubsteppe  (Washington, 

Oregon,  Idaho;  physiographic  area  89), 

Basin  and  Range  (Nevada,  western  Utah, 

southeastern  Idaho;  physiographic  area  80), 

and Level 1 species in need of conservation 

action (Wyoming)

v

  Wyoming  NHP  rank  of  S3B  (rare  or  local, 



or restricted range) and Wyoming Species of 

Concern


v

  Colorado  NHP  rank  of  S2B/SZN  (breeding 

populations  state  imperiled)  and  a  Colorado 

Division  of  Wildlife  Species  of  Special 

Concern

v

  listed  as  vulnerable  in  Canada  (De  Smet 



1992)

v

  categorized  as  “highly  imperiled”  in  U.S. 



Shorebird  Conservation  Plan  (Brown  et  al. 

2000).


Existing Regulatory Mechanisms

Management Plans, and Conservation 

Strategies

Laws, regulations, and management direction

Although the long-billed curlew is on the Region 

2 Regional Forester’s Sensitive Species List, there are 

no  existing  legal  mechanisms,  management  plans, 

or  conservation  strategies  that  apply  specifically  to 

this  species.  It  does  receive  protection  under  several 

laws, including the Migratory Bird Treaty Act (1918), 

the  National  Forest  Management Act  (1976),  and  the 

Neotropical  Migratory  Bird  Conservation Act  (2000). 

The Migratory Bird Treaty Act prohibits, with certain 

exceptions, the pursuit, hunting, capture, killing, taking, 

sale, purchase, transport, receipt for shipment, or export 

of  any  migratory  bird,  or  the  nest  or  eggs  of  such 

birds  (16  U.S.C.  703;  http://laws.fws.gov/lawsdigest/

migtrea.html).  Furthermore,  treaties  formed  because 

of  the  Act  require  the  federal  government  to  protect 

ecosystems  of  special  importance  to  migratory  birds 

against  pollution,  detrimental  alterations,  and  other 

environmental degradations.

The  National  Forest  Management  Act  and  its 

implementing  regulations  and  policies  require  the 

USFS  to  sustain  habitats  that  support  healthy,  well-

distributed populations of native and desired non-native 

plant  and  animal  species  on  National  Forest  System 

lands.  Legally  required  activities  include  monitoring 

population  trends  of  management  indicator  species 

in  relationship  to  habitat  change,  determining  effects 

of  management  practices,  monitoring  the  effects  of 

oil  and  gas  development  and  off-road  vehicles,  and 

maintaining  biological  diversity.  By  policy,  sensitive 

species designation is a tool to help ensure that species 

with identifiable viability concerns are conserved.

The Neotropical Bird Conservation Act provides 

grants  to  U.S.,  Latin  American,  and  Caribbean 

organizations for the conservation of birds that breed in 

the United States and winter south of the U.S.-Mexico 

border.  It  encourages  habitat  protection,  education, 

research,  monitoring,  and  the  long-term  protection 

of  Neotropical  migratory  birds  (http://laws.fws.gov/

lawsdigest/neotrop.html).

The  standards  and  guidelines  of  the  Forest 

Service  Government  Performance  Results Act  ensure 

that resources are managed in a sustainable manner. The 

National  Environmental  Policy  Act  requires  agencies 

to  specify  environmentally  preferable  alternatives  in 

land  use  management  planning. Additional  laws  with 

which  USFS  management  plans  must  comply  are  the 

Endangered Species, Clean Water, Clean Air, Mineral 

Leasing, Federal Onshore Oil and Gas Leasing Reform, 

and Mining and Minerals Policy acts; all are potentially 

relevant to long-billed curlew conservation.

National  monitoring  and  conservation-related 

programs  relevant  to  the  long-billed  curlew  include 

the  North  American  Breeding  Bird  Survey  (BBS), 




Yüklə 1,74 Mb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   29




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©genderi.org 2022
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə