Long-billed Curlew (Numenius americanus): a technical Conservation Assessment Prepared for the usda forest Service, Rocky Mountain Region, Species Conservation Project December 12, 2006 James A. Sedgwick



Yüklə 1,74 Mb.
Pdf görüntüsü
səhifə8/29
tarix17.11.2018
ölçüsü1,74 Mb.
#80481
1   ...   4   5   6   7   8   9   10   11   ...   29

14

15

Long-billed Curlew 



RE6

0

2



1

COUNT

YEAR

1967


1972

1977


1982

1987


1992

1997


2002

3

4



Long-billed Curlew 

CE

0

3



2

1

COUNT



YEAR

4

1967



1972

1977


1982

1987


1992

1997


2002

Figure 5. Population trend (average number of birds per route) of long-billed curlew for U.S. Fish and Wildlife 

Service Region 6 (Mountain-Prairie Region) from 1966 to 2004.



Figure 6. Population trend (average number of birds per route) of long-billed curlew for the Central Region of the 

Breeding Bird Survey from 1966 to 2004.




14

15

Figure 7. Breeding Bird Survey trend map (average percent population change per year) for long-billed curlew from 

1966 to 2003.

southwestern  Idaho  (Dugger  and  Dugger  2002),  and 

the last week of March for Kansas (Thompson and Ely 

1989),  South  Dakota  (South  Dakota  Ornithologists’ 

Union  1991),  Utah  (Paton  et  al.  1992),  and  Oregon 

(Gilligan et al. 1994). The spring migration peak occurs 

in mid-March in Texas and in mid-April in Utah (Paton 

et  al.  1992).  Curlews  arrive  in  Colorado  in  mid-  to 

late-March (King 1978), and in Wyoming from mid- to 

late-April (Salt and Wilk 1966). Early arrival dates in 

Canada are the first week in April in British Columbia 

(Campbell  et  al.  1990),  8  April  in  Saskatchewan 

(Renaud 1980), and 16 April in Alberta (Salt and Wilk 

1966).  Peak  arrival  occurs  in  British  Columbia  from 

late March to early April (Campbell et al. 1990), and in 

Saskatchewan and Alberta from mid- to late-April (Salt 

and Wilk 1966, Renaud 1980).

Long-billed  curlews  arrive  on  breeding  areas 

in  small,  heterosexual  groups  (Jenni  et  al.  1981), 

averaging  two  or  three  individuals  (Saskatchewan) 

(Renaud  1980),  but  flocks  of  50  have  been  reported 

in  British  Columbia.  Some  non-breeders  summer  on 

coastal wintering areas (Colwell and Mathis 2001), and 

small flocks of apparent non-breeders occur on breeding 

areas  in  southeastern  Washington  (Allen  1980)  and 

British Columbia (Campbell et al. 1990).

The  breeding  season  for  long-billed  curlews  in 

most areas is from early April through June, extending 

into  July  in  some  areas  (Dugger  and  Dugger  2002). 

Median  clutch-completion  dates  for  3  years  in  Idaho 

were  14,  19,  and  24 April  (Redmond  1986),  but  late 

egg-laying  dates  include  the  end  of  May  in  Colorado 

and  Utah,  4  June  in  British  Columbia  (Campbell  et 

al.  1990),  and  early  July  in  Saskatchewan  and  Idaho 

(Dugger  and  Dugger  2002).  Egg  hatching  normally 

occurs  from  May  through  June  (Oregon,  Idaho, 

Washington, Utah, and Colorado) to early to mid-July 

(Wyoming) (Dugger and Dugger 2002).

Curlews periodically depart the breeding grounds 

in  small  flocks,  with  no  real  evidence  of  fall  staging 

(Campbell  et  al.  1990).  During  late  summer  and 

migration, flocks of 10 to 50 birds are common (range = 

100 to 500; Allen 1980, Renaud 1980, Pampush 1981, 

Campbell et al. 1990, Roy 1996). Small migratory flocks 

in Utah during fall contain one or two adults and two to 

four juveniles, suggesting that family groups sometimes 

migrate together (Paton and Dalton 1994).

Long-billed  curlews  depart  their  breeding 

grounds  relatively  early.  In  Saskatchewan  and  British 

Columbia,  most  birds  depart  by  late August  (Renaud 

1980, Campbell et al. 1990); early August is believed 

to be the peak of fall migration in South Dakota (South 

Dakota  Ornithologists’  Union  1991).  In  Utah,  the 

number  of  breeders  on  areas  around  Great  Salt  Lake 

declines after the first week of June (Paton and Dalton 



16

17

1994).  In  Kansas,  fall  migrants  are  commonly  seen 



from 21 August to 25 September (Thompson and Ely 

1989). Curlews first arrive in the Playa Lakes region, 

Texas, between 28 July and 13 August, and in Sonora, 

Mexico,  most  curlews  pass  through  in  August  and 

September (Russell and Monson 1998). In the southern-

most portion of their winter range (Costa Rica), curlews 

have been recorded beginning in mid-December (Stiles 

and Skutch 1989).

Habitat

Habitat associations

Long-billed curlews are native prairie specialists, 

nesting  primarily  in  shortgrass  or  mixed-grass  prairie 

habitat  with  flat  to  rolling  topography  (King  1978, 

Pampush  1980,  Jenni  et  al.  1981,  Pampush  and 

Anthony 1993, Hooper and Pitt 1996). They prefer short 

vegetation, generally less than 30 cm tall (often less than 

10 cm), and generally avoid habitats with trees, a high 

density of shrubs (e.g., sagebrush [Artemisia spp.]), and 

tall, dense grass (Pampush 1981, Campbell et al. 1990, 

Pampush  and Anthony  1993).  Open,  sparse  grassland 

habitats may facilitate predator detection, and foraging 

with  such  a  long  bill  may  be  difficult  or  inefficient 

in  tall,  dense  habitats  (Redmond  1986).  Curlews  use 

taller,  denser  grass  during  brood  rearing  when  shade 

and  camouflage  from  predators  are  presumably  more 

important for chicks (Jenni et al. 1981), but this may 

also  reflect  a  decline  in  the  availability  of  shorter 

habitats  later  in  the  season.  Curlews  will  also  nest 

in  croplands  if  vegetation  is  of  the  correct  height. 

Climate  modeling  indicates  that  the  limits  of  curlew 

breeding distribution are correlated with high summer 

precipitation  (average  >68.1  mm)  in  the  east,  high 

winter  precipitation  (average  >89.5  mm)  in  the  west, 

low  winter  temperatures  (average  <-12.2  °C)  in  the 

north,  and  high  summer  temperatures  (average  >24.9 

°C) in the south (Price 1995).

Long-billed curlews in Colorado used shortgrass, 

mixed-grass,  and  weedy  areas  more  than  expected 

based on the availability of those habitats (King 1978). 

They  used  agricultural  areas  (i.e.,  cropland,  stubble 

fields,  bare  ground)  less  than  expected  based  on 

availability  and  did  not  use  areas  dominated  by  sand 

sagebrush (Artemisia filifolia). In the Platte River Valley 

of Nebraska, curlews nested at higher densities in wet 

meadows  than  in  upland  prairie  (Faanes  and  Lingle 

1995).  Within  the  sandhill  grasslands  of  Nebraska, 

proximity  of  mixed-grass  uplands  to  wet  meadows 

was the most important criterion in nest-site selection 

(Bicak 1977). In north-central Oregon, areas of shrubs 

or areas of downy brome (Bromus tectorum) intermixed 

with patches of Sandberg’s bluegrass (Poa sandbergii

were  preferred  or  used  in  proportion  to  availability 

(Pampush 1980, Pampush and Anthony 1993). Areas of 

dense forbs, antelope bitterbrush (Purshia tridentata), 

and  bunchgrasses  were  used  in  proportion  to  their 

availability or were avoided.

In  winter  along  the  Pacific  Coast,  curlews  use 

tidal estuaries, wet pasture habitats, and sandy beaches; 

unlike  willets  (Catoptrophorus  semipalmatus)  and 

marbled  godwits  (Limosa  fedoa),  curlews  use  beach 

habitat  infrequently  (Stenzel  et  al.  1976,  Colwell  and 

Sundeen 2000). They commonly roost in high-elevation 

salt marsh during high tide (Page et al. 1979, Danufsky 

2000). In California (Humboldt Bay), wintering curlews 

regularly  occur  only  in  tidal  mudflats  (27  percent  of 

surveys)  and  salt  marshes  (37  percent)  (Gerstenberg 

1979)  or  use  flooded  and  unflooded  cultivated  rice 

(Oryza  spp.),  managed  wetlands,  evaporation  ponds, 

sewage ponds, and grassland habitats (Central Valley) 

(Day  and  Colwell  1998,  Shuford  et  al.  1998,  Elphick 

2000).  Along  the  Gulf  Coast  of  southeastern  Texas, 

long-billed  curlews  almost  exclusively  use  shallowly 

inundated mudflats (Brush 1995) but frequently move 

between intertidal flats and inland areas (Brush 1995).

Of  the  shallow-water  habitats,  curlews  use 

flooded agricultural fields most in winter and managed 

wetlands  most  in  spring;  in  late  summer/fall,  most 

were  reported  in  pastures,  drainage  ditches,  sloughs, 

streams,  farm  ponds,  and  reservoirs  (Shuford  et  al. 

1998).  Curlews  used  flooded  rice  fields  more  during 

dry versus wet years. Use was independent of harvest 

practices  (i.e.,  conventional  vs.  stripper-header), 

winter  hydroperiods  (i.e.,  dry,  puddled,  intentionally 

flooded),  and  post  harvest  treatment  of  stubble  (i.e., 

none,  burned,  chopped,  rolled,  plowed)  (Elphick  and 

Oring  1998,  Shuford  et  al.  1998).  Curlews  occurred 

more frequently in fields flooded <16 cm deep, where 

median water depth was approximately 5 cm (Elphick 

and Oring 1998).

Long-billed  curlews  favor  a  wide  range  of 

habitats  during  migration,  including  dry  short-grass 

prairie,  wetlands  associated  with  alkali  lakes,  playa 

lakes,  wet  coastal  pasture,  tidal  mudflats,  salt  marsh, 

alfalfa fields, barley fields, fallow agriculture fields, and 

harvested  rice  fields  (Colwell  and  Dodd  1995,  Davis 

1996,  Warnock  et  al.  1998,  Manzano-Fischer  et  al. 

1999, Danufsky 2000). In northern Chihuahua, Mexico, 

curlews occur in association with prairie dog colonies in 

fall (Manzano-Fischer et al. 1999). In the Playa Lakes 

region  of  Texas,  at  least  95  percent  of  flocks  during 




Yüklə 1,74 Mb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:
1   ...   4   5   6   7   8   9   10   11   ...   29




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©genderi.org 2022
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə