Long-billed Curlew (Numenius americanus): a technical Conservation Assessment Prepared for the usda forest Service, Rocky Mountain Region, Species Conservation Project December 12, 2006 James A. Sedgwick



Yüklə 1,74 Mb.
Pdf görüntüsü
səhifə9/29
tarix17.11.2018
ölçüsü1,74 Mb.
#80481
1   ...   5   6   7   8   9   10   11   12   ...   29

16

17

migration used sparsely vegetated wetlands (less than 



33 percent vegetation cover), and use of such wetlands 

exceeded  availability  during  later  summer  and  fall 

(Davis 1996). Deep water (over 16 cm deep) was not 

used,  but  use  (46.2  percent)  of  shallowly  flooded  (0 

to  4  cm)  habitat  exceeded  availability  (10.2  percent); 

moderately flooded (4 to 16 cm) and wet mud were used 

in proportion to availability (Davis 1996).

Microhabitat

Dominant  plants  in  different  parts  of  the 

curlew’s range include common buffalo grass (Buchloe 

dactyloides),  blue  grama  grass  (Bouteloua  gracilis), 

and  prickly  pear  cactus  (Opuntia  spp.)  in  Colorado 

(Graul 1971, King 1978); several species of bluestem 

(Andropogon spp.), needle and thread (Stipa comata), 

sixweek’s fescue (Festuca bromides), and sand dropseed 

(Sporobolus  cryptandrus)  in  Nebraska  (Bicak  1977); 

cheatgrass brome (Bromus tectorum) and medusa-head 

wild rye (Taeniatherum asperum) in Idaho (Redmond 

et  al.  1981);  cheatgrass  brome,  Sandberg’s  bluegrass, 

and  medusa-head  wild  rye,  but  also  shrubbier 

habitats  dominated  by  saltgrass  (Distichlis  spicata), 

greasewood  (Sarcobatus  vermiculatus),  or  sagebrush 

in  southeastern  Washington  and  the  Columbia  and 

Northern  Great  Basins  (Pampush  1980);  blue  grama 

grass,  spike  moss  (Selaginella  densa),  fringed 

sagebrush (Artemisia frigida), golden aster (Chrysopsis 



villosa), and blackroot sedge (Carex eleocharis) in the 

Northern  Great  Plains  (Kantrud  and  Kologiski  1982); 

pickleweed (Salicornia europaea), Bassia spp., Suaeda 

spp.,  saltgrass,  and  pigweed  (Chenopodium  album

around  Great  Salt  Lake,  Utah  (Paton  and  Dalton 

1994); and wire grass (Juncus balticus) and mountain 

timothy (Phleum alpinum) in Wyoming (Cochrane and 

Anderson 1987). Based on nest density (Oregon), long-

billed curlews favored cheatgrass-dominated grasslands 

(9 nests per km

2

, range = 5–22.5) over bunchgrass (3.5 



nests per km

2

, range = 0–7.5), dense forb (3.3 nests per 



km

2

, range = 0–5), open low shrub (2.5 nests per km



2

range = 0–5), or bitterbrush (1.3 nests per km



2

, range 


= 0–2.5) habitats (Pampush and Anthony 1993). These 

preferences  are  likely  related  to  vegetation  structure 

and  not  specific  plant-species  composition  (Jenni  et 

al. 1981).

Long-billed curlews also nest in agricultural fields 

in  the  Great  Basin,  including  wheat  stubble;  fallow 

fields;  and  short,  dry,  cereal-grain  fields  (Pampush 

1980). Curlews use cultivated hay fields dominated by 

timothy (Phleum pratense), redtop (Agrostis palustris), 

reed  canary  grass  (Phalaris  arundinacea),  alsike 

clover  (Trifolium  hybridum),  milkvetch  (Astragalus 

spp.),  meadow  foxtail  (Alopecurus  pratensis),  and 

alfalfa  (Medicago  sativa)  in  Wyoming  (Cochrane 

and Anderson  1987).  Curlews  are  not  reported  to  use 

agricultural  fields  for  nesting  in  Idaho,  but  they  do 

forage  in  agricultural  fields  throughout  the  breeding 

season  (Jenni  et  al.  1981).  During  brood  rearing, 

curlews  use  habitats  with  taller  vegetative  structure 

(up  to  25  cm) and  greater vertical density (76  to  100 

percent) than nest-site habitats (King 1978).

Vegetation at nest sites is “patchier” than curlew 

habitat in general (Pampush and Anthony 1993, Hooper 

and  Pitt  1996),  with  mean  vegetation  height  <10  cm 

(King  1978,  Allen  1980,  Jenni  et  al.  1981,  Hooper 

and  Pitt  1996)  and  mean  vertical  vegetation  density 

<50 percent (Jenni et al. 1981, Hooper and Pitt 1996). 

In  Colorado,  mean  vegetation  height  at  nests  was  11 

cm ± 6.73 SD (range = 4-23, n = 7); mean vegetation 

density was 72.1 percent ± 19.55 SD (range = 50-95; 

King  1978).  In  Utah,  nests  were  in  clumps  of  thick 

residual  and  growing  vegetation  with  relatively  little 

bare ground present (n = 10; Paton and Dalton 1994). 

In British Columbia, preferred nest sites included flat, 

grassy uplands or gravelly ridges and hillsides; curlews 

avoided  tall,  thick  patches  of  grass  or  sagebrush 

(Campbell et al. 1990). In Idaho, curlew abundance was 

negatively correlated with vegetation height and percent 

vertical coverage (Bicak et al. 1982).

Long-billed  curlews  generally  choose  relatively 

dry, exposed sites for nests. However, the presence of 

water has a direct bearing on the initiation of nesting, 

and curlews may desert otherwise appropriate areas in 

dry  years (Ligon 1961).  Long-billed curlews frequent 

areas of moist soils where prey populations are higher. 

In the Riske Creek area of British Columbia, nests were 

more  common  on  gentle,  north-facing  slopes  (3°)  at 

high elevations (mean = 940 m; Hooper and Pitt 1996). 

The average slope at nests in Colorado was 1.3 percent ± 

0.85 SD (range = 0.6–3.0, n = 7; King 1978). In Alberta, 

nests  tended  to  occur  more  often  along  transects  that 

did  not  include  wetlands  (Gratto-Trevor  1999).  In 

Wyoming, nests were more common on hummocks or 

higher, drier ground (Cochrane and Anderson 1987). In 

Colorado, nests were located 50 m to over 1.6 km from 

water, but 41 percent were located within 100 m (n = 63; 

McCallum et al. 1977).

Nests are often located near conspicuous objects, 

including livestock dung piles, rocks, and dirt mounds 

(King 1978, Allen 1980, Cochrane and Anderson 1987). 

In southeastern Colorado, six of seven nests were were 

no more than 20 cm from dung piles (King 1978). In 

southeastern Washington, 37 percent of the nests were 




Yüklə 1,74 Mb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:
1   ...   5   6   7   8   9   10   11   12   ...   29




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©genderi.org 2022
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə