Luiz A. A. Eva



Yüklə 296,66 Kb.

səhifə1/11
tarix17.11.2018
ölçüsü296,66 Kb.
  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   10   11


 

 



Kriterion vol.2 no.se Belo Horizonte 2006 

 

 



 

On the affinities between Bacon's philosophy and skepticism 

 

 

 

 

Luiz A. A. Eva 

 

Artigo substituído em Setembro de 2008 por solicitação do editor do periódico. 



 

 

 

ABSTRACT 

 

This  text  aims  at  examining  the  relations  between  Bacon’s  reflections  on  the  limits  of  our 



faculties and philosophical skepticism — a theme not so dominant in the most recent literature, 

despite the many references to that philosophy. Even though these references seem at first sight 

somewhat  vague  and  imprecise,  we  came  to  the  conclusion  that  not  only  a  close  exam  can 

reveal the relevance of the theme in regard to the comprehension of Bacon’s own philosophy, 

but  also  show  his  interest  in  contemporary  skeptical  literature.  The  distinctive  features  of  his 

own interpretation seem to anticipate how skepticism is to be understood by future philosophers 

as Hume, for instance. 

 

Keywords: Bacon, Skepticism, Idols, Empiricism, Montaigne, Descartes. 



 

 

As Michel Malherbe says in his edition of the French version of Novum organum



this work of Bacon, at times celebrated, at times neglected, has always been poorly read. 

Although he alludes here to its fortunes in France, his remark is relevant in a much more 

general  way,  in  spite  of the  fact  that  some  of  the  most important  modern philosophers 

have  made  use  of  this  author  in  order  to  define  the  meaning  of  their  own  enterprises. 

Hume  refers  to  Bacon  as  the  father  of  experimental  physics  and  depicts  his  science  of 

human  nature  as  an  attempt  to  continue  the  work  he  embarked  upon  and  which  was 

carried  on  by  other  British  moralists,  since  they  made  experience  the  foundation  for 

reflection.

1

  As  an  epigraph  to  his  Critique  of  Pure  Reason,  Kant  picked  out  a  passage 



                                                 

1

  HUME  (1984),  p.  44.  It  is  worth  comparing  the  Introduction  of  the  Treatise  with  aphorism  I,  §80  of  Novum 



Organum, where Bacon maintains that a new link between natural philosophy and particular sciences could afford 

progress and depth, not only to mechanical arts and medicine, but also to “logical sciences” and “civil and moral 

philosophy”.  The  references  to  the  Novum  Organum  indicate  firstly  the  book,  then  the  number  of  the  aphorism, 



 

 



from the Preface to Magna instauratio in which Bacon presents himself as the one who, 

instead  of  founding  a  new  sect,  aimed  to  lay  the  foundations  for  a  collective  work, 

capable of eradicating a recurrent mistake.

2

 



However  —  and  we  hope  we  are  not  committing  an  injustice  or  endorsing  an 

overstatement  -  not  even  the  relative  lack  of  studies  on  Baconian  philosophy  seems  to 

us  to  justify  the  shortcomings  in  the  approaches  to  his  relations  with  philosophical 

skepticism.  We  are  aware  of  only  one  paper  entirely  devoted  to  this  theme  —  a  quite 

recent  article,  incidentally;

3

  and  the  topic  received  nothing  but  casual  or  general 



mentions  by  the  classic  commentaries  in  the  course  of  the  twentieth  century,  even 

though  Bacon  frequently  refers  to  skepticism  and  its  adepts  in  acatalepsia  throughout 

his work, from his earlier writings, such as The Praise of Knowledge (1592), up to such 

mature works as the Novum organum (1620).

4

 Considering that the commentaries have 



very often focused on the examination of the connections between Bacon’s thought and 

the  intellectual  traditions  of  the  Renaissance  —  such  as  that  by  Lisa  Jardine,  who  was 

concerned with dialectic, or that of Paolo Rossi, who highlighted, among other aspects, 

Bacon’s  relationship  with  so-called  “natural  magic”

5

  —  the  gap  becomes  even  more 



noticeable insofar as the works of Charles Schmitt and Richard Popkin provide a clearer 

vision of how the skeptical traditions of the Renaissance, both academic and Pyrrhonist, 

have  contributed  towards  the  constitution  of  modern  thought  in  a  not  yet  well-defined 

                                                                                                                                               

and finally the page number of the first volume of The Works of Francis Bacon, Spedding-Ellis-Heath edition (see 

Bibliography).  All the references to this edition here will include “Sp”. 

2

  KANT (1980). This epigraph was included in the Second Edition of this work. 



3

    Cf.  GRANADA.  This  author  evaluates  the  state  of  art  of  the  question  closely  to  the  way  we  do  here.  We  are 

grateful  for  his  kindness  in  allowing  us  to  refer  to  a  preliminary  version  of  his  article  which  has  not  yet  been 

published. 

4

  There  are  other  works  in  which  Bacon  explicitily  alludes  to  skepticism,  such  as  Valerius  Terminus  (1603),  The 



advancement  of  learning  (1605),  Temporis  Partus  Masculus  (after  1605),  Scala  Intelectus  (before  1612)  and  De 

augmentis scientiarum (1623). 

5

 JARDINE (1974); ROSSI (1968); GRANADA 






Dostları ilə paylaş:
  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   10   11


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©genderi.org 2017
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə