Luiz A. A. Eva



Yüklə 296,66 Kb.

səhifə10/11
tarix17.11.2018
ölçüsü296,66 Kb.
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   10   11

 

 

24 



association with paradoxical and ironic rhetoric, as in Erasmus’ The Praise of Folly, in 

the works of Rabelais and in Agrippa’s Vanitate scientiarum itself.

65

 As we saw, Bacon 



admits  the  possibility  of  this  kind  of  association  in  authors  who  maintain  ambiguous 

positions, as in Socrates’ case, and in the same passage of Temporis partus masculus he 

confesses  that  he  himself  is  writing  under  the  veil  of  invective  (maledictus),  which 

allows  him  to  expose  his  critique  concisely  and  to  pick  and  choose  the  expressions  to 

aim  at  each  of  the  authors  he  criticizes.

66

  Might  not  Bacon’s  critique  of  Agrippa,  to 



some degree, be a product of the same rhetorical and ironical procedure? This would be 

quite in accordance with the hypothesis proposed by Deleule, for whom that opuscule, 

as well as others made before the Novum organum, consists of  a rhetorical experiment 

aimed at convincing different readers towards the collective task of Instauratio.

67

 In this 



case,  Bacon’s  critique  of  skepticism  would  merely  be  the  paradoxical  result  of  a 

skeptical literary strategy connected with the tradition of paradox. The initial impression 

of this critique of skeptical philosophers (for the way their own investigation leads them 

to an erratic research) could then give rise to another reading, apparently more faithful 

to  the  text,  and  according  to  which  skepticism  amuses  him  by  exhibiting  the 

shortcomings of those philosophies who claim to have  arrived at the truth (perhaps by 

pointing  out  how  they  move  in  demonstrative  “circles”).  Would  not  this  reading  be 

more appropriate for the praises that Bacon heaps on skeptical philosophers in the texts 

above? In one way or another, this passage appears to show that Bacon was sensitive to 

different facets of contemporary skepticism. 

However,  Agrippa  is  probably  not  the  most  relevant  reference  in  regard  to  the 

skeptical affinities accepted by Bacon. Formigari and Granada have consistently pointed 

                                                 

65

 On this ? theme see COLIE (1966) and TOURNON (1989). 



66

 See Sp. III, p. 536-537. 

67

 BACON (1987), p. 15. 




 

 

25 



out  how  some  aspects  of  Quod  nihil  scitur  (1581),  by  Francisco  Sanchez,  resemble 

certain  features  of  the  doctrine  of  the  idols  —  with  reference  to  the  attacks  on  the 

Aristotelian notion of science understood as perfect knowledge of the causes, as well as 

to the critique of language or to the recognition of the obstacles derived from the social 

organization of knowledge and brevity of life.

68

 Besides, like Bacon in the idola tribus



Sanchez  also  intends  to  expose  the  mistakes  and  imperfections  of  the  intellect  and 

human  senses,  which  are  incapable  of  offering  us  access  to  how  things  are  in 

themselves.

69

  Although  he  introduces  a  method  that  would  give  us  access  to  the  very 



form of things, Bacon likewise admits an “internal” dimension of nature itself, beyond 

the things offered to us  by the  conjunction or disjunction of natural bodies, and which 

would certainly be unintelligible to us due to the limitations of our faculties.

70

 And even 



though  Sanchez  grants  that  it  is  impossible  to  ever  acquire  “perfect  knowledge”,  he 

admits  that  experience  can  offer  us  a  limited  form  of  knowledge  of  things,  capable  of 

distinguishing them regarding their aim, clarity and degree, and also announces a work 

aimed  at  elaborating  a  method  designed  for  this.

71

  Thus,  however  different  both 



perspectives  might  be  in  regard  to  the  potential  extent  of  our  knowledge,  both 

philosophers  consider  experience  to  be  a  privileged  source  of  knowledge,  without 

thereby claiming that our perceptions can give us any sort of immediate certainty. Even 

though Sanchez develops his reflections mainly from Academic sources, and apparently 

was  not  acquainted  with  the  texts  of  Sextus,  he  is  a  strong  candidate  to  represent  the 

version of skepticism most in accordance with Bacon’s own philosophical positions.

72

  

                                                 



68

 See GRANADA, p. 3-5; FORMIGARI, 1970 apud GRANADA; SANCHEZ (1988), p. 20-28, 68. 

69

 See SANCHEZ, p. 55-57, 59-62. 



70

 N.O. I, §4, Sp. I, p. 157. 

71

 SANCHEZ (1988), p. 55. 



72

 There are scholars who hold an opposite view. We agree on this point with POPKIN (2000, p. 84-85), who refers to 

scholars who thought of Sanchez not as a skeptic, but as an empiricist opening new roads and preparing the ground 

for  Francis  Bacon,  and  using  skeptical  arguments  only  to  refute  Aristotelianism.  But  even  if  we  leave  aside  this 




 

 

26 



For the same reason, however, Quod nihil scitur seems to be an insufficient source 

to explain the existence of the Pyrrhonist elements which, as we said, appear here and 

there  in  Baconian  doctrine,  if  the  hypothesis  that  he  did  not  have  direct  access  to  the 

Hipotiposes  is  correct.  That  would  be  an  additional  reason  to  take  equally  into 

consideration the Essays (1580-1588) of Montaigne — in which, as Popkin pointed out, 

almost  all  the  items  of  the  Pyrrhonist  armory  of  argument  are  present  according  to 

Sextus’  presentation.

73

  In  a  remarkable  though  seldom  mentioned  study,  Pierre  Villey 



shows  us  that  Bacon  really  read  and  referred  to  Montaigne’s  Essays  —  translated  into 

English  and  published  by  John  Florio  in  1603  —  at  different  points  in  his  intellectual 

career.

74

 In Villey’s opinion, Montaigne’s strongest influence on Bacon’s thought is not 



to be found in Bacon’s Essay, the similarities of which with Montaigne’s work are quite 

small, although the Baconian title was surely inspired, according to that interpreter, by 

the  French  work.

75

  According  to  Villey,  the  philosophical  affinities  show  up  more 



clearly  in  his  mature  works,  and  especially  in  respect  to  the  relation  between  the 

critiques of human knowledge, as featured in the doctrine of the idols, and the skeptical 

pieces  of  reasoning  of  the  Apology,  as  demonstrated  by  the  multiple  and  detailed 

approximations  enumerated  by  the  interpreter  (including  texts  that  suggest  Bacon 

characterized  Montaigne  as  a  skeptic,  as  was  usual  at  that  time).

76

  Villey  is  cautious 



                                                                                                                                               

interpretation, we still have good reasons to see a similarity between Sanchez and Bacon due to a re-evaluation of 

the doctrine of idols. 

73

 Ibid., 103  



74

 VILLEY (1973), p. 10-14. Besides the fact that Bacon’s diplomat brother Anthony lived for twelve years in France 

and  kept  up  a  correspondance  with  Montaigne,  Villey  lists  as  a  sign  of  the  contact  of  Francis  Bacon  with  Les 

Essais the very title of his own Essays; an explicit mention of Montaigne in the De Augmentis Scientiarum, and an 

example  of  psychological  explanation  that  surely  comes  from  his  book.  However,  Villey  suggests  that  his 

influence  may  be  much  greater  than  it  appears,  due  to  the  codes  of  citation  of  this  period  and  the  rather 

unsystematic way Montaigne expounds his ideas. 

75

 See note below. 



76

  Ibid.  pp.  77,  110.  The  text  by  Bacon  that  Villey  refers  to  is  from  De  Aug.  V,  II,  which  he  compares  with 

Montaigne’s discussion on the likenesses between men and animals, in the Apology. Villey himself, however, feels 

it is going too far to see Montaigne as a skeptic. (p. 105) For a different interpretation I venture to refer the reader 

to to my own EVA (2007). 





Dostları ilə paylaş:
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   10   11


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©genderi.org 2017
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə