Luiz A. A. Eva



Yüklə 296,66 Kb.

səhifə11/11
tarix17.11.2018
ölçüsü296,66 Kb.
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   10   11

 

 

27 



enough to keep his approximations on a hypothetical level, given the lack of conclusive 

evidence.  However,  the  existing  indications  not  only  impelled  him  to  conclude  that 

Bacon  surely  read  Montaigne,  but  also  that  such  reading  would  have  awakened  and 

kindled  his  critical  spirit,  so  as  to  appreciate  the  weakness  of  available  philosophical 

methods  as  well  as  of  human  reason  left  to  its  own  powers.  In  consequence,  an 

approximation  between  these  two  authors  is  more  justifiable  than  the  one  commonly 

made between Montaigne, Descartes and Pascal.

77

 



In short, it is possible that Bacon was an important link in the very constitution of 

the so-called mitigated skepticism,

78

 as well as in the modern construction of the image 



of Pyrrhonist skepticism — which is historically inaccurate —  as a philosophy whose 

radicalism  fatally  opposed  it  to  the  modern  ideals  of  natural  investigation.  Bacon  has 

been  read  with  great  interest  by  other  philosophers  who  were  fundamental  in  the  way 

this image was spread by posterity — such as Hume, for instance. On the other hand, as 

we  saw,  this  does  not  mean  that  he  did  not  assimilate  skeptical  and  even  Pyrrhonist 

elements  into  his  own  reflections,  however  transformed  and  adapted,  in  a  much  more 

expressive  philosophical  dimension  than  that  which  can  be  observed  in  other  modern 

authors  more  often  associated  with  skepticism.  However  different  the  philosophies  of 

Descartes  and  Bacon  might  be,  it  is  plausible  to  say  that  in  the  First  Cartesian 

Meditation as well as in the Baconian doctrine of the idols we are dealing with methodic 

reconstructions that were not only inspired by skeptical doubt, but which aim to express, 

to some extent, the cogency and actuality of the skeptical diagnosis concerning the lack 

of grounds for knowledge. Without being skeptical in themselves, those reconstructions 

                                                 

77

 Ibid., p. 109. Even here the links between Bacon, Montaigne and Sanchez could be tightened, both regarding the 



separation  of  religious  questions  and  natural  research  and  the  evaluation  of  experience  that  we  observe  also  in 

Montaigne, as stressed by OLIVEIRA (2002), p. 78. The latter author’s remarks concerning relations on the theme 

of  the  “limits  of  knowledge”  and  the  passage  from  the  “phenomena  to  nature”  do  not  seem  to  me  so  clear  and 

precise. 

78

 For similar remarks, see OLIVEIRA (2002), p. 75. 




 

 

28 



aimed  to  embrace  the  profundity  of  the  problems  exposed  by  the  very  authors  they 

wished  to  overcome.  Equally,  the  singularity  of  the  strategies  applied  by  each  one  of 

them  is  already  noticeable  in  the  reformulation  of  those  problems,  i.  e.,  in  the 

“destructive” and “dubitative” parts of their reflections, by virtue of which both prepare 

the ground for the advent of a new philosophy. 

But it is worth noticing  here the  gap that separates Descartes from  Bacon.  In the 

first case, even though the methodic doubt lasts till the end of the Sixth Meditation, the 

road  to  its  suppression  begins  in  the  opening  of  the  Second  Meditation,  where  it  is 

already  possible  to  admit  the  Archimedean  certainty  of  the  cogito,  which  will 

acknowledge clear, distinct ideas as a criterion of truth. In fact, however important the 

doubt might be in the construction of metaphysics, its ceaseless activity is limited to the 

First  Meditation,  and  in  the  Sixth,  by  the  end  of  the  journey,  it  might  reappear, 

according  to  the  author,  as  “hyperbolic  and  ridiculous”.

79

  Whereas  Descartes  presents 



himself as a philosopher capable of achieving a certainty beyond the most radical doubt 

a skeptic could ever imagine, Bacon is not willing to advance any complete or universal 

theory,  nor  can  he  take  it  as  something  possible  due  to  the  actual  state  of  affairs  and 

spirits.


80

  He  limits  himself  to  the  exposition  of  a  viable  alternative  to  overcome  the 

poverty of human knowledge, by offering relevant indications for a new induction able 

to  lead  men  progressively  to  a  complete  reinvention  of  principles  and  axioms.

81

  The 


undertaking he aims at announcing is not a task for one man alone, nor can it be limited 

to  individual  talents,  whose  power  of  persuasion  cannot  be  mistaken  for  real  research 

                                                 

79

 We argued in EVA (2001) that Descartes did not himself take the arguments of his hyperbolic doubt as possessing 



an autonomous validity. They should be seen as tied to the methodological decision taken at the beginning of the 

Meditations, where, looking for something “solid and stable in sciences”, he decides to identify the false and the 

doubtful,  deliberately  distorting  our  usual  cognitive  standards.  This  would  be  why  Descartes  describes  his  own 

doubt as only “pretended”, “hyperbolical and ridiculous”. 

80

 See N.O., I, §116.  



81

 See N.O., I §§101-105. 




 

 

29 



into nature.

82

 However, this collective enterprise remains useless if we do not manage to 



rectify the fatal mistakes that are already to be seen in the first digestion of experience 

— or, putting it another way, if it is not possible to find a way round the idols, whose 

presence  strengthens  the  skeptics  whenever  they  suspend  their  judgment  before  any 

available knowledge.

83

 

Thus, even if the  causes of our incapacity to know — identified by  Bacon in his 



doctrine of idols — might be different from those pointed out by the skeptics, he aimed 

at  taking  the  philosophical  relevance  of  skepticism  into  his  own  thinking  in  a  more 

generous  way  than  Descartes  did.  The  “temporary  skepticism”  that  should  be  adopted 

by this doctrine, although it corresponds to just one part of the method — according to 

Bacon’s  exact  formulation  —  is  not  limited  to  a  methodic  resolution  that  could  be 

suppressed together with this same resolution, but is the reflection of the evaluation of 

our  actual  cognitive  limitations.  Hence,  in  spite  of  the  fact  that  posterity  has  usually 

referred  to  Cartesian  methodic  doubt  whenever  it  looked  for  a  modern  version  of 

skepticism, might it not be better echoed in the doctrine of the idols — which, according 

to  Bacon,  carries  an  autonomous  interest  and  a  latent  philosophical  actuality  in  its 

problems, without however being skeptical, beyond its own attempt to solve them? At 

least,  Bacon’s  philosophy  offers  itself,  in  this  respect,  as  an  exclusive  chapter  —  all-

                                                 

82

 Arguing for the need for a new Natural History, he says: “Those however who aspire not to guess and divine, but to 



discover and know; who propose not to devise mimic and fabulous worlds of their own, but to examine and dissect 

the nature of this very world itself; must go to facts themselves for everything. Nor can the place of this labor and 

search  and  worldwide  perambulation  be  supplied  by  any  genius  or  meditation  or  argumentation;  no,  not  if  all 

men’s could meet in one. This therefore we must have or the business must be for ever abandoned...” (Sp. I, 140; 

IV, 28) 

83

  Cf.  I,  §30,  Sp.  IV,  52:  “Though  all  the  wits  of  all  the  ages  should  meet  together  and  combine  and  transmit  their 



labours, yet will no great progress ever be made in science by means of anticipations; because radical errors in the 

first concoction of the mind are not to be cured by the excellence of functions and remedies subsequent.” 




 

 

30 



important  and  insufficiently  explored  —  of  the  transmission  and  modification  of  the 

critical legacy of Ancient skepticism in modern times.

84

 

 



BIBLIOGRAPHY: 

 

BACON,  Francis  (1889)  The  Works  of  Francis  Bacon,  in  seven  volumes,  collected  and  



  

edited by Spedding, Ellis and Heath, London, Longmans & Co. 

 

———————  (1986).  Novum  Organum.  Introduction,  traduction  et  notes  par  Michel  



 

Malherbe  et  Jean-Marie  Pousseur.  Paris,  Presses  Universitaries  de  France.  Data  

 

da primeira edição: 1620. 



 

———————  (1987)  Récusation  des  doctrines  philosophiques  et  autres  opuscules.  

  

Traduction  par  Georges  Rombi  et  Didier  Deleule,  Introduction  et  notes  par  



  

Didier Deleule. Paris, PUF, col. Épimethé. 

 

 

BOLZANI  FILHO,  Roberto  (1990),  “Ceticismo  e  Empirismo”,  Discurso,  São  Paulo,  



  

FFLCH-USP, n. 18, p. 37-67 

 

CICERO  (1994),  De  Natura  Deorum  /  Academica.  Loeb  Classical  Editions,  vol.  268,  ed.  



 

H. Rackham, London, Cambridge, Harvard University Press. 

 

COLIE,  Rosalie  (1996),  Paradoxia  Epidemica  —  The  Renaissance  Tradition  of  Paradox,  



 

Princeton University Press 

 

EVA,  Luiz  A.,  (2001).  “Sobre  o  argumento  cartesiano  do  sonho  e  o  ceticismo  moderno”,  



 

Revista  Latinoamericana  de  Filosofia,  vol.  XXVII,  num.  2,  (Primavera  2001),  pp.  

 

199-225 



 

——————  (2007),  A  Figura  do  Filósofo  —  Ceticismo  e  Subjetividade  em  Montaigne,  

 

São Paulo, Loyola. 



 

FREDE,  Michael  (1987),  “The  Ancient  Empiricists”,  in  Essays  in  Ancient  Philosophy,  pp.  

  

243-260 


 

GRANADA,  M.  A.  (2006),  “Bacon  and  Scepticism”,  Nouvelles  de  la  Republique  des  



  

Lettres, 1 (We quote from this paper in a preliminary version) 

 

HUME, David (1984). A Treatise of Human Nature. London, Penguin Books. 



 

JARDINE, Lisa (1974). Francis Bacon — Discovery and the Art of Discourse, Cambridge, 

Cambridge University Press. 

 

KANT,  Emmanuel  (1980).  Œuvres  Philosophiques,  vol.  1,  Paris,  Editions  Gallimard.  



 

Data da primeira edição da Crítica da Razão Pura: 1781. 

 

                                                 



84

 I would like to thank Prof. Miguel Granada, of the University of Barcelona, for his useful suggestions regarding an 

earlier  version  of  this  text,  as  well  as  the  anonymous  referee  who  read  it  for  this  publication,  whose  comments 

were also most helpful. 




 

 

31 



LE  DOEUFF,  Michelle.  (1985)  “L´esperance  dans  la  science”  in  Francis  Bacon  Science  et  

  

Méthode.  Actes  du  colloque  de  Nantes  édités  par  Michel  Malherbe  et  Jean-Marie  

  

Pousseur, Paris, Vrin, pp. 37-51 



 

MONTAIGNE,  Michel  de  (1993),  An  Apology  for  Raymond  Sebond,  translation  M.A.  

 

Screech, London, Penguin Books.  



 

———————————  (1999)  Les  Essais,  édition  de  Pierre  Villey,  Paris,  Presses  

  

Universitaires de France, col. Quadrige. 



 

POPKIN,  Richard  (2000).  História  do  Ceticismo  de  Erasmo  a  Espinosa,  Rio  de  Janeiro:  

  

Francisco Alves, tradução de Danilo Marcondes,  



 

PORCHAT,  Oswaldo  (2005),  “Empirismo  e  Ceticismo”,  Discurso,  São  Paulo,  FFLCH- 

  

USP, n. 35 



 

PRIOR,  Moody  (1968),  “Bacon’s  Man  of  Science”,  in  Essential  Articles  for  the  Study  of  



  

Francis  Bacon,  edited  by  Brian  Vickers,  Connecticut,  Archon  Books,  reprinted  

  

from Journal of the History of Ideas, vol 15 (1954), pp. 348-70.  



 

ROSSI,  Paolo  (1968),  Francis  Bacon:  from  Magic  to  Science,  London,  Routledge  &  K.  

  

Paul. 


 

SANCHEZ, Francisco. (1988) That Nothing is Known (Quod Nihil Scitur), ed. trans. Elaine 

Limbrick, D F S Thomson, Cambridge, Cambridge University Press. 

 

SCHMITT, C. B. (1972) Cicero Scepticus: a study of the influence of the Academica in the  



Renaissance. The Hague. 

 

SEXTUS  EMPIRICUS  (1993),  Complete  Works  in  four  volumes,  ed.  R.  G.  Bury,  Loeb  



  

Classical Editions, Harvard University Press. 

 

TOURNON,  André  (1989).  “Images  du  pyrrhonisme  selon  quelques  écrivains  de  la  



 

Renaissance  (Pic  de  la  Mirandole,  Henri-Corneille  Agrippa,  Guy  de  Bruès,  Michel  

 

de  Montaigne,  Béroalde  de  Verville),  in  Les  Humanistes  et  l´Antiquité  Grecque,  



 

edité par Mitchiko Ishigami-Iagolnitzer, Paris, Presses du CNRS. 

 

VILLEY,  Pierre  (1973)  Montaigne  et  François  Bacon.  Slatkine  Reprints,  Genève. 



 

(Reprint from 1913 Paris edition) 

 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

Translated by Fernando Moraes Barros 

Reviewed by Michael Watkins and Luiz Eva 

Translation from Kriterion, Belo Horizonte, v.47, n.113, p.73-97, June 2006. 





Dostları ilə paylaş:
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   10   11


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©genderi.org 2017
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə