Luiz A. A. Eva



Yüklə 296,66 Kb.

səhifə2/11
tarix17.11.2018
ölçüsü296,66 Kb.
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   10   11

 

 



dimension.

6

 It is true that, in his classical work, Popkin considers Bacon as a proponent 



of a kind of “temporary  or partial skepticism”, nonetheless assuming that, in this case, 

he is not dealing with a skeptic, but instead, as he sees it, with the leading figure of an 

“Aristotelian”  strategy  to  respond  to  skepticism.  Once  again,  however,  these  are  just 

passing  allusions  and,  as  such,  are  not  developed  into  a  more  detailed  examination  of 

how  he  understood  and  solved  the  skeptical  problem  within  his  personal  reflection.

7

 



However, even if it is hard to determine the sources on which Bacon relied, it seems to 

us that there are enough elements to argue that skepticism played a much more relevant 

role in his philosophical reflection than has usually been acknowledged. 

Here, we shall neither deal with a close investigation into the question of whether 

those aspects of Baconian philosophy which seem to bear some relation with skeptical 

themes are closely connected or not with the skeptical way of advancing doubtful pieces 

of  reasoning,  nor  shall  we  offer  an  examination  of  the  way  he  expected  to  respond  to 

skeptical problems. Before doing this, it seems to us important to examine how far we 

can  evaluate  the  philosophical  significance  of  the  affinities  acknowledged  by  Bacon 

between  his  ideas  and  that  sort  of  philosophy,  bearing  in  mind  the  very  passages  in 

which he expresses his opinion about it. As we shall see, they seem to indicate that it is 

possible to go beyond the general remarks on the “influences” of this philosophy upon 

his  own  reflection  and  to  make  precise  the  meaning  that  he  conveyed  to  that 

relationship,  even  though  we  cannot  argue  that  Bacon  considers  his  own  “Doctrine  of 

                                                 

6

 SCHMITT (1972); POPKIN (2001) 



7

  Cf.  POPKIN  (2001),  pp.  85,  156,  174,  202.  Popkin  does  not  provide  a  clear  justification  for  this  assimilation  of 

Bacon’s case into the  Aristotelian type of responses to skepticism.  On p. 208, he nevertheless says that all these 

Aristotelian responses bear the common feature that there would be normal conditions of our faculties functioning 

according  to  which  we  could  attain  knowledge,  but  it  is  doubtful  whether  we  should  include  the  case  of  Bacon 

here,  as  we  shall  see.  Even  though  we  may  recognize  several  points  of  contact  between  his  philosophy  and  

Aristotelianism—  see  MALHERBE,  1986,  p.  36  —  Popkin’s  hypothesis  has  to  be  contrasted  with  the  many 

criticisms  Bacon  directs  towards  that  philosopher,  whom  he  sees  as  a  paradigm  of  “rationalist”  corruption  of 

Philosophy (cf. N.O., I, §§54, 63, 67, 77). The new edition of Popkin’s History (2003) contains nothing new about 

Bacon. In his turn, OLIVEIRA (2002) devotes to the theme a chapter of his book, which we will consider next. 

 



 

 



Idols”  as  a  skeptical  doctrine.  The  affinity  that  he  accepts  between  the  diagnosis  of 

knowledge  offered  by  this  doctrine  and  the  skeptical  position  seems  to  be  so  that  his 

revocation would not only depend, according to Bacon, upon the possession of the new 

method to investigate nature which he aims at announcing, but also upon the complete 

fulfillment  of  the  project  on  the  foundation  of  a  science  of  the  Forms  of  the  things 

themselves — something that Bacon himself takes as an impossible task and delegates 

to  the  work  of  future  generations.  Furthermore,  most  of  the  discussions  about 

philosophical skepticism are frequently  compromised by the vagueness of this concept 

— and Bacon’s case is far from being an exception. Therefore, we will also try to keep 

in  mind  the  way  his  reflections  take  into  account  the  different  aspects  with  which  the 

skeptical  way  of  thinking  presents  itself  in  the  midst  of  the  intellectual  atmosphere  of 

the Renaissance (including the association between skepticism and literary paradox), as 

well as the differences between the skeptical schools. Nevertheless, with regard to this 

last  point,  we  can  notice  that  Bacon’s  thought  —  apparently  through  lack  of  a  more 

direct  contact  with  the  works  of  Sextus  Empiricus  —  conforms  to  its  own  theoretical 

reflections  on  the  theme,  thus  converging  into  a  type  of  distinction  between  “extreme 

skepticism” and “moderate skepticism” quite similar to the one which would turn out to 

be usual in the philosophy to come. 

We should note from the start that Bacon’s references to philosophical skepticism 

constantly  bear  a  critical  element,  continually  taking  up  the  same  points:  according  to 

him,  the  skeptics  are  those  who  profaned  the  oracle  of  the  senses  and  human  faculties 

instead of providing them with the support needed to obtain the truth, and outlined their 

diagnosis of our cognitive situation so as to substitute the straight path of research for a 

simple “ride about things” through pleasant dissertations.

8

 But these observations offer 



                                                 

8

 See, for instance, N.O. I, §67 (Sp I, 179). 




 

 



just a partial image, which can lead us to a false evaluation if we do not bear in mind the 

fact that, on more than one occasion, his critiques are brought to light in the form of a 

counterpoint  between  his  own  world-view  and  the  skeptical  way  of  thinking.  In 

aphorism  I  §  37  of  Novum  organum,  for  instance,  Bacon  writes  —  concerning  the 

philosophers who argued for a suspension of assent: 

 

The doctrine [ratio] of those who denied that certainty could be attained at all [eorum qui 



acatalepsia tenuerunt], has some agreement with my way of proceeding at the first setting 

out [initiis]; but they end in being infinitely separated and opposed. For the holders of that 

doctrine  assert  simply  that  nothing  can  be  known;  I  also  assert  that  not  much  can  be 

known  in  nature  by  the  way  which  is  now  in  use.  But  then  they  go  on  to  destroy  the 

authority  of  the  senses;  whereas  I  proceed  to  devise  and  supply  helps  [auxilia]  for  the 

same.


9

 

 



 

In this text, Bacon exposes the “final” distance that he considers to exist between 

his  reflection  and  that  of  the  supporters  of  acatalepsia  (in  an  oblique  reference  to  the 

skeptics  of  the  New  Academy,  as  we  shall  see  better),  but  only  after  the 

acknowledgement of an affinity. In our view, a first important point consists in trying to 

comprehend better the meaning of this opposition between the beginning (initium) and 

the  end  (exitus)  of  these  paths  compared  by  him.  Should  it  just  exhibit  the  unreliable 

character  of  the  resemblance  between  these  philosophies  and  conclude  that  “initial” 

would  stand  here  for  “at  first  sight”  (as  Spedding´s  translation  proposes)?  Or,  despite 

the disagreements mentioned, might this counterpoint have, philosophically speaking, a 

more essential meaning regarding the possible similarities identified by Bacon between 

                                                 

9

  N.O.  I,  §37,  Sp.  I,  p.  162-163; IV,  p.  52.  I  follow  the  Spedding  translation here  and  go  to  the  original  Latin  text 



when necessary. 




Dostları ilə paylaş:
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   10   11


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©genderi.org 2017
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə