Luiz A. A. Eva



Yüklə 296,66 Kb.

səhifə3/11
tarix17.11.2018
ölçüsü296,66 Kb.
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   10   11

 

 



the skeptical ratio and that of his own? It seems that there are reasons to incline towards 

the second option. 

As  often  happens,  the  distance  marked  by  Bacon  with  respect  to  skeptics  is 

directly connected with the auxilia, which he wished to apply to our cognitive faculties. 

We  can  safely  admit  that  this  corresponds  to  a  general  allusion  to  his  own  inductive 

method,  through  which  he  aimed  at  contributing  towards  the  establishment  of  what  he 

describes as a “genuine marriage between soul and things”;

10

 a method able to provide a 



real interpretation of nature — in contrast to mere “anticipations” created by traditional 

philosophy  —  and  therefore  to  reach  the  knowledge  of  true  Forms,  and  by  the  same 

token, to take human knowledge and power to an entirely new dimension. But it is not 

until  the  second  book  of  Novum  organum  (which  corresponds  to  the  so-called  pars 



informans)  that  the  positive  exposition  of  the  method  begins  (by  means  of  examples 

designed to illustrate practical procedures by which induction could be guided amongst 

particular  things,  especially  as  regards  its  position  on  the  “tables  of  invention”). 

However much these illustrations can be taken as a completed exposition of the formula 

of  induction  —  at  least  in  its  general  features,  as  Malherbe  suggests  —  the  plain 

exposition  of  its  method  could  only  be  fulfilled  in  the  accomplishment  of  philosophy, 

that  is  to  say,  in  the  very  Interpretation  of  Nature  that  would  take  place  after  the 

exhibition of the Organum — since the method, by virtue of its own demands, would be 

able to adapt to the things themselves, in line with the very progress of the research.

11

 



The Novum organum forms, indeed, just the second part of the Instauratio magna, and 

according to what we read in the Distributio operis, it is only in the third part (entitled 



Phaenomena universi) that we stop digging up the road and start traveling on it (above 

all, through the construction of a Natural History based upon new concepts and carried 

                                                 

10

 This would be confirmed by his use of the usual metaphor of the “path” (via) to describe this parallel. 




 

 



out  on  an  unprecedented  scale).

12

  In  the  fourth  part,  entitled  Scala  intellectus,  Bacon 



intended to offer more examples of particulars according to the Tables of Invention, and 

to  therefore  give  us  something  more  than  just  a  glimmer  of  hope  on  the  progress  of 

knowledge,  as  was  temporarily  justified  by  the  end  of  the  first  part  of  the  Novum 

organum.  Nevertheless,  he  also  reminds  us  that  it  is  a  question  of  giving  examples  of 

research  for  the  purpose  of  clarification.

13

  In  this  fourth  part,  he  says,  the  things 



themselves  would  be  presented,  “so  to  speak”  (tanquam);

14

  “so  to  speak”  perhaps 



because we would not yet be at that ultimate stage he foresaw — the Second Philosophy 

or Active Science, the only one that can assure us the knowledge of Forms in the strict 

sense  of  the  term.  However,  being  outlined  as  the  sixth  stage  of  the  itinerary,

15

  this 



philosophy,  which  has  been  previously  prepared  by  genuine  research,  purified  and 

severe, is something that goes far beyond his personal expectations, since its fulfillment 

is inconceivable in view of the actual state of affairs and spirits.

16

 



We went back briefly in this itinerary just to give an idea  of the difficulties that 

Bacon himself, despite his optimism, encounters on the way to the actual knowledge of 

things. As he puts it in the preface of Instauratio magna, his own method is essentially 

one  of  truly  genuine  humiliation  of  the  human  spirit,  as  opposed  to  over-hasty 

evaluation of the real forces of the mind: 

 

For all those who before me applied themselves to the invention of arts but cast a glance 



or  two  upon  facts  and  examples  and  experiences,  and  straightaway  proceeded,  as  if 

                                                                                                                                               

11

 Cf. BACON (1986), p. 47 



12

 Distributio operis, Sp. I, p. 140 

13

 Cf. ibid., Sp. I, p. 143-144  



14

 N.O. I, §92, Sp. I, p. 199 

15

  This  part  would  still  be  preceded  by  the  Prodroms,  or  Anticipations  of  Second  Philosophy,  corresponding  to  the 



fifth part of the Instauratio, in which it would be a matter of offering a collection of what was invented and proved, 

not with the help of the method, but by the ordinary use of understanding. (Cf. Sp I, 143-144) 

16

 Idem 




 

 



invention  were  nothing  more  than  an  exercise  of  thought,  to  invoke  their  own  spirits  to 

give them oracles.

17

 

 



Stressing this point is also a way to observe better the methodological  continuity 

that exists between the pars informans of the Novum organum  (where,  as we said, the 

positive dimension of this movement towards the knowledge of  Forms becomes clear) 

and the slow progression that lays the ground for it in the first book, to which belong a 



pars praeparans in the strict sense and a pars destruens that precedes it — dedicated to 

exposing  the  state  of  the  art  in  all  knowledge  in  a  critical  way  and  contributing  to  the 

destruction  of  impediments  that  prevent  the  inquiry  into  nature  from  advancing  —  the 

so-called  “idols”.  Although  these  impediments  are  frequently  mentioned  in  Bacon’s 

works,  it  is  in  the  Novum  organum  that  their  exposition  is  most  fully  developed  and 

systematized.  In  his  view,  pointing  them  out  is  crucial  if  we  are  have  any  hope  of 

avoiding the everlasting repetition of mistakes, and proceed, by means of a purification 

of  human  understanding,  to  a  radical  reconstruction  of  all  knowledge  ab  imis 



fundamentis.

18

  But  if  the  first  movement  of  Bacon’s  own  method  requires  a  critical 



rejection  of  present  knowledge,  and  if  the  agreement  he  intends  to  make  with  the 

adherents  to  acatalepsia  can  be  well  expressed  by  the  motto  “we  know  nothing” 

(however hard Bacon tries to attenuate it by saying that we “know almost nothing” and 

that this situation is temporary and relative), would it not be reasonable to admit that the 

“initial” affinity between his philosophy and that of the skeptics includes a reference to 

his  own  method  (even  if  it  limits  itself  to  its  destructive  part)?  Given  that  the  above-

mentioned  aphorism  marks  the  distance,  could  it  not  equally  well  be  read  as  a 

confirmation of a philosophical affinity — noticeable not only in the broadest sense of 

                                                 

17

 Sp. I, 130; IV, 19 



18

 Sp I, p. 139; N.O. I, §31, Sp I, 162. 






Dostları ilə paylaş:
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   10   11


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©genderi.org 2017
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə