Luiz A. A. Eva



Yüklə 296,66 Kb.

səhifə4/11
tarix17.11.2018
ölçüsü296,66 Kb.
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   10   11

 

 



the idea, but also in more detailed conceptual aspects, as we shall see? It gives us a first 

indication that Bacon acknowledged a similarity, albeit restricted, between the skeptical 

percept  of  the  whole  of  human  knowledge  and  his  own,  as  he  finds  himself  at  the 

beginning of investigation, that is to say, at the very moment when his reflection turns 

to a future project that has not been fully developed and is fraught with difficulties, as 

he constantly stresses. 

A  second  point,  quite  similar  to  this  last  one,  has  to  do  with  the  “doctrine  of  the 

idols”,  the  centre  of  the  pars  destruens,  in  which  Bacon  distinguishes  four  types  of 

impediments  to  our  expectations  of  gaining  access  to  truth:  the  “Idols  of  the  Tribe” 

(idola  tribus), that  follow  from  the  imperfections  of  our  faculties  of  knowledge  —  the 

intellect, as a deforming mirror that mixes its own nature with the nature of things when 

exposed to their rays, falsifying and shuffling them; or, even, as a faculty that becomes 

a  hostage  of  the  systematic  mistakes  that  it  cannot  rectify  by  itself,  neither  through  its 

own powers nor through dialectic;

19

 the imperfections of the senses, which are weak and 



deceptive in themselves, and cannot be helped by the instruments designed to improve 

and  strengthen  them,

20

  in  spite  of  the  fact  that  the  senses  constitute  the  very  field  to 



which questions should be addressed in the inquiry into nature, “unless we are willing to 

be  delirious”,  as  he  says.  Next  are  the  “Idols  of  the  Cave”  (idola  specus),  created, 

according to Bacon, by the multiplicity typical of each individual, and depending on the 

differences  of  the  body,  soul,  education,  habit,  casual  circumstances  and  also  the  way 

they  are  affected  by  objects.  The  “Idols  of  the  Marketplace”  (idola  fori)  are,  in  turn, 

those that can be found in the imperfections of human language, whereas the “Idols of 

the Theatre” (idola theatri) are those by means of which Bacon metaphorically alludes 

to  the  imaginary  worlds  made  up  of  the  different  philosophical  systems,  which  are 

                                                 

19

 See N.O., I, §14, §§45-52 and also Sp. I, 121-129.  




 

 

10 



formed  by  fanciful  and  imperfect  notions  (such  as  “being”,  “substance”,  “element”, 

“matter”  and  so  forth),  as  well  as  by  insufficient  proofs,  which  are,  in  his  words,  the 

systems in potentiality.

21

 



As Granada observed, the aphorisms of the Novum organum that clearly deal with 

his relations with skepticism occupy strategic positions regarding the exposition of this 

doctrine.

22

  More  precisely,  the  first  of  them  in  order  of  exposition  is  the  above-



mentioned  aphorism  I  §  37,  which  could  be  understood  as  a  transitional  aphorism 

between  the  previous  movement  of  the  text  —  where  the  commitments  of  the  logic 

which  operates  in  research  are  discussed,  as  well  as  the  difficulties  in  establishing  a 

suitable  method  for  the  investigation,  and  exposition,  of  the  idols.  It  thus  marks  the 

beginning  of  the  exposition  of  the  idols,  whereas  the  next  aphorism  dedicated  to  the 

subject  (I  §  67)  takes  up  the  counterpoint  with  a  predominantly  critical  slant  —  the 

skeptics are accused of an intemperance in abolishing assent similar to the intemperance 

that dogmatic philosophers display when subscribing to their doctrines, and of adopting 

a  position  which,  even  when  they  leave  room  for  investigation,  leads  to  it  being 

abandoned due to their despair of reaching the truth — and paves the way, in the next 

aphorism, for the following remark: “That is enough about the different types of Idols, 

and  their  equipage”

23

.  Thus,  however  much  the  slow  progression  of  Bacon’s  text  may 



appear  at  first  sight  to  have  a  nonlinear  development,  in  which  anticipations  and 

repetitions  of  previously  introduced  terms  are  frequent,

24

  these  aphorisms  indicate  that 



                                                                                                                                               

20

 Sp. I, 138; N.O. I, §50. 



21

 N.O. I, §68; See N.O. I §44, §61. 

22

 Cf. GRANADA, p. 4 



23

 N.O. I, §68, Sp I, 179, IV, 69. 

24

 It is no easy task to establish a clear division of the logical moments in the progression of this text. In spite of what 



we  remarked  concerning  I  §68,  it  would  be  better  to  include  in  the  exposition  of  the  Idols  of  the  Theatre  his 

criticism of faulty demonstrations (which Bacon considered the rampart of the idols), offered in aphorisms 69-70, 

as Malherbe does (cf. BACON, 1986, pp. 15-16). Moreover, it is not clear how the fourfold division of the species 

of idols can be reconciled with the threefold one offered in I, §115, on which Spedding bases himself for his own 

division (cf. Sp. I, pp. 165, 172) 



 

 

11 



Bacon encompassed two clear references to skepticism in his exposition of the doctrine 

of the idols. Although he does not state this explicitly, these references could be perhaps 

read,  according  to  the  same  hypothesis,  as  a  sign  of  his  proximity  to  the  skeptics;  this 

would then allow us, in a more detailed approach, to delve deeper into the counterpoint 

in  a  critical  way,  but  only  after  the  presentation  of  his  own  version  of  the  critique  of 

human  knowledge,  as  this  doctrine  formulates  it.  If  this  is  so,  these  aphorisms  would 

indicate that Bacon focuses his affinities with skepticism primarily on the development 

of that doctrine.

25

 

These two indications of the affinities between Bacon and skepticism, taken from 



his  most  famous  work,  are  certainly  somewhat  indirect  and  conjectural.  Nevertheless, 

their  interest  lies  in  the  fact  that  they  allow  us  to  transpose  to  a  reading  of  Novum 



organum  what  he  says  in  a  more  explicit  way  in  other  passages  concerning  the  same 

parallel.  In  a  concise  text  entitled  Scala  intellectus  sive  filum  labyrinthi,  composed,  it 

seems, as a preface to the homonymous part of the Magna instauratio, Bacon writes: 

 

“(...) We cannot however absolutely deny that, if there was not an opposition to a society 



between our philosophy and those of the ancients, it is with this philosophical gender [that 

is, that which proposes that “nothing is known”] that we would be more akin; we would 

agree with much of their wise sayings and remarks on the variations of the senses and the 

lack of firmness of the human judgement, and on the contention and suspension of assent. 

To  those  we  could  add  many  other  similar  [remarks],  to  the  point  that  between  us  and 

them  remains  only  this  difference:  they  say  that  nothing  is  known  simply  [prorsus]  and 

we  affirm  that  nothing  can  be  known  along  the  way  the  human  race  has  up  until  now 

followed...”

26

 

 



                                                 

25

 See PRIOR (1968), p. 141 



26

 Sp II, p. 688. 






Dostları ilə paylaş:
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   10   11


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©genderi.org 2017
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə