Luiz A. A. Eva



Yüklə 296,66 Kb.

səhifə5/11
tarix17.11.2018
ölçüsü296,66 Kb.
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   10   11

 

 

12 



In this text, developed entirely around the comparison between his philosophy and 

that  of  the  skeptics,  elements  that  undermine  the  proximity  reappear.  Especially  in  the 

passage  quoted  above,  they  are  projected  in  the  form  of  a  more  general  opposition 

between his philosophy and that of the Ancients. In fact, Bacon frequently stresses how 

the  forms  of  human  knowledge  are  related,  amongst  other  aspects,  to  their  time  and 

place of origin, and to the society that produced them, and in general tends to condemn 

the  wisdom  of  the  Greeks  by  ascribing  to  it  a  rather  professorial  and  rhetorical 

approach, which prevented it from going deeper in the quest for truth.

27

 In a passage of 



Novum  organum,  he  brings  up  the  name  of  the  academic  skeptic  Carneades  together 

with  those  who,  in  his  view,  with  more  or  less  dignity,  were  all  Sophists.

28

  Even  so, 



could he be more explicit in pointing out the aspects of his reflection that, in his view, 

reveal an agreement with the skeptics — that is to say, the philosophers with whom they 

were  most  connected,  despite  their  antiquity?  Moreover,  he  offers  us  details  about  the 

points  on  which  he  was  in  agreement  with  them,  namely  about  their  “wise  sayings” 

concerning  the  precariousness  of  the  senses  and  human  intellect,  as  well  as  the 

suspension of assent.

29

  However peculiar the way in which these themes are dealt with 



by  Bacon, they  are directly included in the scope of the doctrine of the idols, both the 

idola  tribus  —  which  concern  the  poverty  of  our  cognitive  faculties  —  and  the  idola 

theatri  —  which,  in  turn,  demand  a  refusal  of  the  fantasies  created  by  philosophical 

theories and their methods up to that time. 

                                                 

27

 See N.O., I §32, 34, 61. 



28

 N.O. I, §71 

29

  This  is  why  it  does  not  seem  to  us  quite  exact  to  affirm  that  Bacon  makes  “non-explicit  use”  of  “skeptical 



philosophical arguments”. (see OLIVEIRA, 2002, p. 75) On the other hand, I do not think we are allowed to call 

him “skeptical”, even though “mitigated” or “constructive”. Bacon stresses that it is not possible for there to be a 

society  between  his  philosophy  and  that  of  the  Ancients,  a  remark  that  has  a  conceptual  range  which  has  to  be 

taken into account if we want to understand how he reconciles his avowed proximity to this philosophy with his 

criticism. 



 

 

13 



However, due to the fact that Bacon presents his “idols” with the explicit purpose 

of  “purifying the understanding” with a view to obtaining the truth, it could be thought 

that this doctrine already overcomes the skeptical point of view. But things are not that 

simple.  However  different  the  Baconian  idols  may  be  from  skeptical  modes  of 

suspension, and although its exposition aims at surmounting them (and not at repeating 

them  indefinitely),  Bacon  never  stops  stressing  the  difficulty  and  limits  of  this  task 

before the power of such impediments. He qualifies two types of idols as being “innate” 

(namely  the  idola  tribus,  regarding  our  cognitive  faculties,  and  the  idola  specus

regarding  our  individual  differences),  as  opposed  to  those  which,  although 

“adventitious”  (the  idola  fori  and  the  idola  theatri),  maintain  close  relations  with  the 

former idols. And whereas the adventitious idols, as he says,  are quite difficult to root 

out, the innate ones are described as impossible to eradicate: 

 

All that can be done is to point them out, so that the insidious action of the mind may be 



marked and reproved (else as fast as old errors are destroyed new ones will spring up out 

of the ill complexion of the mind itself, and so we shall have but a change of errors, not a 

clearance)...

30

 



 

Thus,  it  is  not  just  a  question  of  neutralizing  the  idols  that  block  access  to  truth, 

like  a  fortuitous  refutation  of  skepticism.  Even  if  there  are,  according  to  Bacon, 

effective measures to consistently face them before going down  the path of research — 

such as what he presents as  signs (signa) of the sad state of  current philosophy, as well 

as the causes of this phenomenon

31

 — the only proper cure would, in his view, lie in the 



axioms  and  notions  that  could  be  produced  by  true  induction.

32

  As  he  says 



                                                 

30

 Distributio operis,  Sp. I, 139; IV, 27 



31

 N.O. I, §70. These signs and causes are effectively discussed near the exposition of the idols, in N.O. I, §§71-91 

32

 See N.O., I §40. In I § 36, Bacon says that the only way to transmit the method is to carry men to the particular 



things and to claim that they deny their notions and start to get acquainted with these very things.  


 

 

14 



metaphorically,  in  the  Redargutio  philosophiarum,  just  as  we  cannot  write  something 

new on tablets before having erased the earlier inscriptions, it will be hard to erase the 

earlier inscriptions in the spirit without having written something new.

33

 Far from being 



just a result of the act of overcoming those impediments to knowledge, the possession 

of  knowledge  of  nature  is,  to  some  extent,  a  condition  of  its  self-overcoming.  But  the 

access  to  such  knowledge,  although  restricted,  does  not  necessarily  imply  the  total 

extinction of those impediments. One of the ways to comprehend the tortuous situation 

that  seems  to  be  brought  about  here  consists  in  accepting  that  we  still  have,  to  some 

degree,  the  same  cognitive  impediments,  as,  by  the  same  token,  the  method  still 

operates  according  to  an  incomplete  formulation,  based  on  insufficient  experimental 

material or provisional conclusions.

34

 But if this is indeed the case, the same agreement 



with  the  skeptical  perspective  is  justified,  in  one  way  or  another,  be  it  partial,  be  it 

temporary.  For  if  a  type  of  methodical  incorporation  of  skepticism  does  correspond  to 

the  initial  affinity  that  Bacon  acknowledged  between  his  philosophy  and  that  of  the 

skeptics, although it eventually reveals itself as a complete opposition, everything looks 

as  if  the  progression  towards  the  knowledge  of  things  could  be  understood  as  the 

continuous overcoming of this partial agreement. 

This  being  so,  the  problem  of  determining  how  and  at  what  moment  in  this 

progression the overcoming would take place turns out to be a relevant one. Indeed, the 

reservations  expressed  by  Bacon  in  the  manifestations  of  his  affinity  with  the  skeptics 

offer  a  strong  indication  that  it  is  worth  searching  for  “preparatory”  elements  of  that 

                                                 

33

 Sp. III, p. 557-558 



34

  According  to  Oliveira,  “Bacon’s  method  of  science  is  not...  the  harbor  that,  maybe  as  it  is  to  Descartes,  would 

assure the access to certainty...”  (OLIVEIRA, 2002, p. 77) But we should not infer  from the recognition of such 

difficulties  that  Bacon  gave  up  hope  of  attaining  certitude  through  his  method.  Since  for  Bacon  the  object  of 

knowledge  is  reality,  even  though  we  cannot  gain  a  perfect  knowledge,  universal  and necessary,  of  it  before  the 

final step of the Instauratio, the intermediate steps will carry some definite degrees of certainty (see MALHERBE, 

1996,  pp. 80,  85, 90, 93-94).  This  distinction  seems  relevant  if  we  wish  to  see  better how  Bacon understood his 

position with regard to skepticism. 






Dostları ilə paylaş:
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   10   11


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©genderi.org 2017
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə