Luiz A. A. Eva



Yüklə 166,48 Kb.
Pdf görüntüsü
səhifə6/11
tarix17.11.2018
ölçüsü166,48 Kb.
#80253
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   10   11

 

 

15 



overcoming within the very formulation of the doctrine of the idols. But it is impossible 

to  come  up  with  a  good  answer  to  this  question  without  carrying  out  a  meticulous 

examination of the content of that doctrine, in order to know how far it reproduces the 

problems  concerning  the  skeptical  tradition,  or  offers  us,  in  its  possible  innovations, 

elements designed to outline an alternative way. We shall not enter this area of concern, 

but it is worth stressing that Bacon’s acknowledgement of the power of the idols creates 

an  identification  with  the  skeptical  diagnosis  that  is  frequently  underestimated  — 

despite the way he stresses the built-in constraints in their position. Besides the text of 



Filum  labyrinthi  mentioned  above,  in  the  De  augmentis  scientiarum  (1623),  where  he 

examines  the  difficulties  arising  from  the  absence  of  reliable  principles  and 

demonstrative methods planned for the investigation of physics, he states:  

 

[...] It was not without great and evident reason that so many philosophers, some of them 



most eminent, became Sceptics or Academics and denied any certainty of knowledge or 

comprehension,  affirming  that  the  knowledge  of  man  extend  only  to  appearances  and 

probabilities.

35

 



 

 

It could be objected to our reading that the indications for a skeptical origin of the 



doctrines of the idols are inconclusive. But what alternatives do we have when it comes 

to the identification of the skeptical sources that are philosophically relevant? Attempts 

have  been  made  to  approximate  this  doctrine  to  the  four  “impediments  to  truth” 

(offendicula veritatis) enumerated by Roger Bacon at the beginning of his Opus majus 

—  the  use  of  an  “insufficient  authority”,  custom,  public  opinion  and  the  disguising  of 

ignorance  together  with  the  presumption  of  knowledge  —  but  Spedding  consistently 

                                                 

35

 Sp. I, 621; IV, 411-412. 




 

 

16 



demonstrates  that  such  a  proximity  is  artificial  and  unlikely.

36

  More  recently,  Deleule 



opposed the attempts to approximate the Baconian doctrine to skepticism, and preferred 

to  refer  the  notion  of  idolum  to  Platonism  and  Epicureanism,  which  he  claims  Bacon 

mentioned  explicitly  —  when  he  refers,  for  instance,  to  Cotta’s  critique  of  Epicurean 

anthropomorphism  in  Cicero’s  De  natura  deorum.

37

  However,  it  must  be  remembered 



that,  within  this  dialogue,  Cotta  is  the  character  intended  to  represent  the  New 

Academy,  of  which  the  author  expresses  his  personal  approval.

38

  Deleule’s  hypothesis 



also  fails  to  convince  due  to  the  fact  that  the  notion  of  idolum  is  normally  referred  by 

Bacon to the vocabulary of imagination and fantasy — as  happens, for example, in his 

approach  to  the  “Idols  of  the  Theatre”,  which  result  from  the  way  in  which  human 

understanding allows itself to be led by the imagination.

39

 This theme is familiar within 



skeptical  literature,  although  Bacon  takes  it  up  in  a  quite  peculiar  way.  Sextus 

Empiricus  himself  refers  to  Plato’s  theory  of  the  soul  as  something  “fanciful”,  and 

employs a term — eidolopoiesis — that, etymologically speaking, is related to the one 

Bacon chose in his critique.

40

 The same theme is expanded and developed in works that 



reveal  skeptical  elements  and  are  contemporary  with  Bacon  —  such  as  the  Quod  nihil 

scitur  of  Sanchez  and  Montaigne’s  Essays.  In  the  Apology  of  Raimond  Sebond,  where 

he  qualifies  the  concepts  of  natural  philosophy  as  “dreams  and  fanciful  follies”,

41

 

                                                 



36

 Cf. Sp. I, 163. According to Spedding, not only does the principle of classification differ in these two doctrines, but 

also the problems enumerated by Roger Bacon are much more restricted (and could at best be related to the idola 

fori  and  idola  theatri).  Moreover,  he  says,  it  is  unlikely  that  Francis  Bacon  would  have  read  his  homonymous 

philosopher, given the absence of printed editions of his work and the lack of signs of a specific interest in it. 

37

 BACON (1987), p. 36 



38

 See CICERO (1994), P. 11-14 

39

 Cf. N.O. I, §44, §15, §47. 



40

 See SEXTUS EMPIRICUS (1993), I, 189. We will refer to his Outlines of Pyrrhonism as HP. Sextus comments, 

for  instance,  the Pythagorean  theory  of  numbers  in  these  terms:  “Those  are  the  fictions  they  imagine...”  (HP  III. 

156) In HP III, 114, as he concludes his critical examination of the dogmatic notions of generation and corruption, 

he  says  that  their  physics  is  “unreal  and  unconceivable”.  The  same  Greek  term  is  employed  in  the  context  of  a 

more general criticism of the dogmatists (see, for instance, HP II, 222). 

41

 MONTAIGNE (1993), p. 110: “...These are dreams and frantic folly. If only Nature would deign to open her breast 



one day and show us the means and the workings of her movements as they really are (first preparing our eyes to 



Yüklə 166,48 Kb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   10   11




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©genderi.org 2022
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə