Luiz A. A. Eva



Yüklə 296,66 Kb.

səhifə7/11
tarix17.11.2018
ölçüsü296,66 Kb.
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   10   11

 

 

17 



Montaigne  also  characterizes  reason  itself  and  the  human  understanding  as  sources  of 

illusions.

42

 

For the same reason, it seems to us that Plato could not be regarded as the source 



of this doctrine — unless by virtue of irony or some skeptical reading. It is true that, in 

The advancement of learning (1605), Bacon explicitly refers to Plato’s Allegory of the 

Cave  in  order  to  illustrate  how  personal  expressions  and  habits  engender  everlasting 

mistakes  and  false  opinions,  and  offer,  therefore,  a  kind  of  sketch  of  the  forthcoming 

idola specus. But he stresses, in a footnote, that he did not have the intention of giving 

these  considerations  the  meaning  Plato  himself  gave  to  the  metaphor.

43

  On  the  other 



hand,  although  he  admits  in  the  Novum  organum  that  this  philosopher  should  be  held 

responsible for the introduction of acatalepsia, he takes him as a model of the class of 

“superstitious” philosophers.

44

 Finally, in line with these considerations, though Bacon 



set  the  idols  created  by  human  nature  against  the  ideas  exclusively  found  in  divine 

understanding,

45

 it is worth remembering that he never employs the term idolum in the 



ordinary  sense  of  the  word,  as  “false  gods”,

46

  not  to  mention  his  insistence  on  the 



distinction  between  natural  science  and  theology.

47

  If  it  is  worth  following  the 



                                                                                                                                               

see  them).  O  God,  what  fallacies  and  miscalculations  we  would  find  in  our  wretched  science!  Either  I  am  quite 

mistaken  or  our  science  has  not  put  one  single  thing  squarely  in  its  rightful  place,  and  I  will  leave  this  world 

knowing nothing better than my own ignorance...” Also Sanchez regards traditional philosophical explanations as 

fictions, as, for instance, when he criticizes the Platonic identification of knowing and remembering: “[...] But with 

apologies  to  this  otherwise  brilliant  thinker,  this  is  a  quite  baseless  fiction  (leve  admodum  figmentum)  not 

supported by experience or by rational argument — like many other dreams he dreamed concerning the soul, as I 

shall demonstrate in my Treatise on the Soul.” (SANCHEZ, 1988, 17) 

42

 “I call reason our ravings and our dreams, under the general dispensation of Philosophy who maintains that even 



the fool and the knave act madly from reason, albeit from one special form of reason” MONTAIGNE  (1993), p. 

94  (translation slightly changed) 

43

  Cf.  Sp.  I,  396.  According  to  Spedding,  Bacon  adds  marginally  to  the  Allegory:  “missa  illa  exquisita  parabolae 



subtilitate” (leaving aside the subtleties of this allegory) 

44

 See respectively I, §67; I §65 



45

 N.O. I, §23, Sp. 60 

46

 As remarked by Spedding (cf. Sp I, p. 89). Yet there seem to be three exceptions noted by LE DOEUFF (1985, p. 



43), whose authority is, nevertheless, doubtful, as she herself recognizes. 

47

 See for instance Sp. 132, I, §§65, 68. Le Doeuff presumes that the doctrine of idols contains a hidden theological 



sense.  (cf.  op.  cit.  p.  43)  However  it  seems  to  us  that  her  interpretation  fails  as  it  tries  to  project  an  “epistemo-


 

 

18 



indications  given  by  the  author  himself,  would  the  elements  mentioned  above  not  be 

safer  and  philosophically  more  relevant  by  pointing  out  the  affinities  between  the 

doctrine of the idols and skepticism? 

However, there are long-standing problems upon which these speculations seem to 

depend,  and  that  might  be  crucial  to  the  development  of  our  analysis:  what  are  the 

skeptical  sources  that  Bacon  really  employed?  How  did  he  understand  them?  Without 

exhausting  the  theme,  we  intend  here  to  suggest  some  ideas  that  might  be  useful  for  a 

deeper approach. 

Firstly,  though  the  problem  of  determining  the  exact  sources  of  Bacon’s  text  is 

particularly  delicate  (amongst  other  reasons  because,  in  line  with  the  literary  codes  of 

that  period,  he  never  identifies  them),  a  text  that  we  already  mentioned  reveals  that 

Bacon is, to some degree, quite aware of the diversity of the skeptical sources, and even 

differentiates  sceptici  and  academici.  Besides,  however  much  he  tends,  in  general,  to 

treat  these  skeptical  approaches  together,  according  to  the  conceptual  bias  of  his  own 

criticism, there are texts in which he takes into account some differences that tell those 

schools apart.  In aphorism 67 of Novum organum, after a brief account of the position 

of those who professed acatalepsia, which was introduced by Plato against the Sophists 

and then transformed into a tenet by the New Academy, he writes: 

 

and  though  their’s  is  a  fairer  seeming  way  than  arbitrary  decisions,  since  [these 



philosophers]  say  that  they  by  no  means  destroy  all  investigation,  as  Pyrrho  and  the 

Ephetics,  but  allow  of  some  things  to  be  followed  as  probable,  though  of  none  to  be 

maintained as true...

48

 



                                                                                                                                               

theologial”  status  on  the  Baconian  concepts  (like  “hope”),  since  it  conflicts  with  the  distinction  Bacon  clearly 

wants to keep between science and theology. (ibid, p. 38, 42) This does not mean that we could not recognize some 

aspects  in  Bacon’s  philosophical  reflexion  as  being  completely  in  harmony  with  theological  themes  invoked  by 

him, so long as we take care not to confuse these two domains that he himself keeps apart. 

48

  N.O.  I,  §  67,  IV  69,  slightly  modified;  cf.  I,  178:  “[...]  Quae  [acatalepsiam  tenere]  licet  honestior  ratio  sit  quam 



pronuntiandi licentia, quum ipsi pro se dicant se minime confundere inquisitionem, ut Pyrrho fecit et Ephetici, sed 

habere quod sequantur ut probabile, licet non habeant quod teneant ut verum...” 






Dostları ilə paylaş:
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   10   11


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©genderi.org 2017
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə