Luiz A. A. Eva



Yüklə 296,66 Kb.

səhifə8/11
tarix17.11.2018
ölçüsü296,66 Kb.
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   10   11

 

 

19 



 

Bacon then  goes on to criticize those philosophers who did not intend to give up 

investigation, because, as he says, once human spirit loses its faith in finding the truth, 

its  interest  in  investigation  weakens  and  degenerates  into  mere  disputes  and  pleasant 

dissertations.

49

 But who might those philosophers be, according to Bacon? Although the 



text admits some ambiguity, the context points not to the Pyrrhonist skeptics, but to the 

defenders  of  the  New  Academy,  that  is  to  say,  to  those  who,  without  hindering 

investigation,  take  opinions  as  probabile  —  the  practical  criterion  according  to  the 

traditional  formulation  of  these  philosophers,  such  as  we  find  in  Cicero,  for  instance. 

This interpretative detail might be useful to evaluate Bacon’s contact with the traditional 

skeptical  sources.  In  fact,  in  the  Academia,  Cicero  assumes  the  position  of  these 

philosophers  by  maintaining  that  certainty  is  not  really  necessary  in  order  to  act 

according  to  common  life  and  to  be  engaged  in  the  “arts”,  and  even  refers  to  the 

pleasure  that  academic  skeptics  seem  to  find  in  the  investigation  of  large  and  hidden 

themes, as well as in reaching some result that has only a resemblance with the truth.

50

 

But did Bacon put forth this counterpoint with regard to the relation between suspension 



of  judgment  and  interest  in  investigation,  and  also  bear  in  mind  how  Sextus  refers  to 

Pyrrhonist  skeptics,  at  the  beginning  of  Hipotiposes,  as  those  that  “keep  on 

investigating”  precisely  in  opposition  to  the  defenders  of  the  New  Academia,  which 

supported the impossibility of knowledge as a kind of negative dogmatism?

51

 Although 



Bacon’s  critiques  have  something  to  do  with  the  particular  conception  of  Pyrrhonist 

inquiry  as  it  was  planned  by  Sextus  (conceived  as  a  neutralizing  activity  of  the 

dogmatic’s  precipitation,  essentially  negative),  the  terms  that  he  normally  uses  to 

                                                 

49

 In the Filum Labyrinthi Bacon presents the same lack of hope as cutting the nerves of human investigation. (Sp. II, 



687) 

50

 See Academica, II, 108, 127-128. 




 

 

20 



describe  how  skepticism  distorts  investigation  (transforming  it  into  pleasant 

dissertations  or  a  “ride  about  things”)  do  not  seem  to  evoke  the  texts  of  Sextus  but, 

rather,  those  of  Cicero  himself  or  even  Montaigne.

52

  Furthermore,  if  we  bear  in  mind 



the  comments  of  Sextus  on  the  affinities  between  Pyrrhonism  and  Greek  Methodic 

Medicine, on practical assent to phainómenon and especially on how this is compatible 

with  the  practice  of  the  tékhnai,  which  are  aimed  at  searching  for  what  is  useful  for 

human well-being, as some recent studies have shown, it would be reasonable to admit 

that  Bacon  certainly  accepts  an  even  greater  affinity  between  his  own  perspective  and 

that  of  the  skeptics.

53

  At  least,  this  seems  to  suggest  that  Bacon  probably  did  not  read 



Sextus  (or  at  least  the  Hipotiposes)  —  even  though  Spedding  has  acknowledged  the 

Adversus logicus, by the same author, as the source of a Baconian allusion to Heraclitus 

in the presentation of idola specus.

54

   


In De augmentis scientiarum, after affirming that many of the  great philosophers 

were  right  to  become  skeptics  and  academics,  just  following  appearances  and 

probabilities, Bacon says that both Socrates and Cicero did not “sincerely” support the 

view that the mind was incapable of obtaining the truth (but only with regard to ironic 

and rhetorical purposes), and declares: “It is certain however that there were some here 

                                                                                                                                               

51

 See HP I, 1-4, 7 



52

 See particularly Les Essais, I, 50, 301-302 (ed. Villey): “[A]...Le jugement est un util à tous subjects, et se mesle 

partout. A cette cause, aux essais que j’en fais icy, j’y employe toute sorte d’occasion... Tantost, à un subject vain 

et de neant, j’essaye voir s’il trouvera dequoy lui donner corps, et dequoy l’appuyer et estançonner. Tantost je le 

promenne à un subject noble et tracassé, auquel il n’a rien à trouver de soy, le chemin en estant si frayé qu’il ne 

peut marcher que sur la piste d’autruy. Là il fait son jeu à eslire la route quy luy semble la meilleure, et, de mille 

sentiers, il dict que cettuy-cy là, qui a esté le meilleux choisi. Je prends de la fortune le premier argument. Ils me 

sont egalement bons. Et ne desseigne jamais de les produire entiers.[C] Car je ne voy le tout de rien: ne font pas 

ceux qui nous prometent de le faire veoir. De cent membres et visages que a chaque chose, j’en prens un tantost à 

lecher  seulement,  tantost  à  effleurer;  et  par  fois  à  pincer  jusqu’à  l’os.  J’y  donne  une  poincte,  non  pas  le  plus 

largement  possible,  mais  le  plus  profondement  que  je  sçay.  Et  aime  plus  souvent  à  les  saisir  par  quelque  lustre 

inusité. Je me hazarderoy de traitter à fons quelque matière, si je me connoissoy moins. Semant icy un mot, icy un 

autre, eschantillons despris de lur piece, escartez, sans dessein et sans promesse, je ne suis pas tenu de faire bon, ny 

de m’y tenir  moy  mesme, sans varier quand il me plaist et me rendre au doubte et incertitude, et à ma  maitresse 

forme, qui est l’ignorance.” 

53

 Following the pioneering studies of FREDE (1987), in Brazil the works of BOLZANI (1991), SMITH (1995) and 



PORCHAT (2005) have stressed several points relating the Pyrrhonism of Sextus to modern empiricism.  

54

 See Sp. I, p. 164, N.O. I, §42, Adv. Math. I, 133; II, 186.  






Dostları ilə paylaş:
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   10   11


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©genderi.org 2017
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə