Luiz A. A. Eva



Yüklə 296,66 Kb.

səhifə9/11
tarix17.11.2018
ölçüsü296,66 Kb.
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   10   11

 

 

21 



and  there  in  both  academies  (both  old  and  new)  and  much  more  among  the  Sceptics 

who held this opinion in simplicity and integrity”.

55

 Thus, in addition to his distinction 



between  these  philosophical  schools,  Bacon  seems  to  consider  different  modes  of 

adopting a skeptical position: a more radical mode, which accepted the impossibility of 

recognizing  the  truth  entirely  and  at  once  (mainly  associated  with  Pyrrhonism  but 

maybe  also,  as  he  says,  with  some  academics),  and  a  milder  mode,  exemplified  by 

Socrates and Cicero, according to which it is possible to admit a suspension subjected to 

different purposes, or a non-integral refusal of the possibility of recognizing the truth. If 

we  compare  this  passage  with  aphorism  I  §  67  of  Novum  organum  quoted  above,  it 

seems  to  suggest  that  Bacon  was  inclined  to  see  a  greater  proximity  between  his  own 

way  of  thinking  and  the  position  endorsed  by  some  of  the  philosophers  generally 

associated  with  the  New  Academy,  insofar  as  he  projects  on  them  a  weaker  kind  of 

skepticism,  without  explicitly  using  this  expression,  however  (and  thereby  closer  to 

enabling the development of an investigation concerning the truth). Moreover, this text 

seems  to  strengthen  the  suggestion  that  Bacon  had  some  contact  with  the  skeptical 

works of Cicero (an author who, according to him, belongs to those who joined the New 

Academy  in  order  to  hold  forth  eloquently  in  utramque  partem,  i.  e.,  regarding  both 

sides of the question),

56

 and even, in view of the contents of his interpretation, with the 



presentation of skepticism offered by Diogenes Laertius in his Life of the Philosophers

as has been suggested by Emil Wolff.

57

 

Even so, it is noticeable how some aspects of the exposition of the doctrine of the 



idols  seem  to  evoke  the  skepticism  exposed  by  Sextus  —  especially  in  regard  to  the 

                                                 

55

  See Sp. I, 621-622; IV, 412.  



56

 According to E. Wolff, even though Bacon distinguishes between Pyrrhonians and Academics, he always quotes 

from  Cicero  and  Diogenes  Laertius  (apud  GRANADA).  As  we  saw,  he  seems  to  rely  also  upon  the  De  Natura 

Deorum when considering the notion of idolum

57

  See  the  note  above.  Granada  seems  to  equally  tend  towards  the  same  evaluation  concerning  the  sources  Bacon 



relied upon.  


 

 

22 



idola  specus,  which  refer,  as  we  saw,  to  the  individual  differences  in  relation  to  the 

body,  soul,  education,  habit  and  circumstances  as  they  are  affected  by  objects  in 

general.  The  Second  Trope  of  Enesidemus  claims  that  the  differences  between  men, 

whether  with  regard  to  their  bodily  constitution  (also  including  the  diversity  of 

preferences  and  how  they  are  affected  by  sense  organs),  or  regarding  the  supposed 

difference  of  their  souls  (derived  from  the  irreducible  variety  of  their  opinion),  must 

lead  us  to  a  suspension  of  judgment  given  the  nonexistence  of  criteria  by  means  of 

which  we  could  put  an  end  to  the  controversy.

58

  Notwithstanding  the  differences  that 



could  be  stressed  between  these  texts  —  concerning,  for  example,  the  modality  of 

oppositions  established  or,  as  Moody  Prior  pointed  out,  the  absence  of  the  kind  of 

reasoning that is proper to the Pyrrhonist trope

59

 — here and elsewhere in the doctrine 



of the idols, there are several other themes that could be conceptually approximated to 

what  we  observed  in  the  texts  of  Sextus:  for  instance,  the  Baconian  refusal  of  the 

anticipation of spirit that is present in traditional philosophy (described as similar to the 

Pyrrhonist  critique  of  propéteia,  the  dogmatic’s  precipitation  in  the  quest  for  truth),

60

 

the way in which “novelty” or habit can distort cognitive activities (as Sextus says in the 



Ninth  Trope  of  Enesidemus,  based  upon  the  rarity  and  frequency  of  things),

61

  or  even 



the critique of inaccuracy and mistakes of the senses (which seem to refer to the themes 

of the Third Trope, based on opposing perceptions according to different human senses, 

or to the Fifth Trope, based on the opposition according to the diversity of perspectives 

and situations of perception).

62

 

                                                 



58

 N.O., I §41, §§53-58; HP I, 80.  

59

 See PRIOR (1986), p. 141. Nevertheless we think he overstates the case when he proposes that we can find all the 



“skeptical modes” in the doctrine of the idols, even if they are embodied in a new analysis. 

60

 N.O. I, §9, §§19-30, §56; cf. HP I, 20, 177, 186; II, 17, 21, 37; III, 280.   



61

 N.O. I§§56, §119; cf. HP I, 141. 

62

 N.O. I§50, cf. HP I, 91, 118. 




 

 

23 



A  possibility  that  should  be  taken  into  account  is  that  Bacon  had  access  to  these 

materials  through  other  sources.  According  to  Granada,  in  the  critique  of  the  idols,  in 

regard to the senses as well as to the intellect in its spontaneous activity, it is possible to 

find  a  “coincidence”  with  skeptical  critique,  both  Greek  and  Renaissancist.

63

  The  fact 



that the tropes are equally exposed by Diogenes Laertius, however imprecisely, suggests 

that  their  presence  does  not  necessarily  refer  to  Sextus.  Even  though  Bacon’s  explicit 

mentions  of  skeptics  and  academics  seem  to  refer  fundamentally  to  the  ancient 

philosophers, maybe we should give more importance to the contemporary sources that 

he  considered  akin  to  skepticism.  Moreover,  it  is  important  to  bear  in  mind  the  way 

Bacon  acknowledges  the  presence  of  skeptical  elements  in  authors  who,  according  to 

him, did not “sincerely” support the suspension of judgment, for it shows that he could 

have  admitted  them  in  the  elaboration  of  his  doctrine  of  the  idols  without  having 

considered them to be totally skeptical. 

At  any  rate,  Bacon  also  alludes  to  contemporary  authors  that  he  relates  to 

skepticism.  However  critical  they  might  be,  theses  allusions  reveal  his  attention  to  the 

peculiarities of skepticism of that period. In the opuscule Temporis partus masculus, he 

refers  to  Agrippa  of  Nettesheim,  author  of  De  incertitudine  et  vanitate  scientiarum  et 

atrium  (1531),  as  a  kind  of  laughable  “street  buffoon”  (trivialis  scurra)  who  distorts 

everything,  and  describes  skepticism  as  a  philosophy  that  “cheers  him  up  and  makes 

him laugh” by making philosophers “walk in circles”.

64

 As Granada proposed, it may be 



possible  that  this  evaluation  is  justified  by  virtue  of  Bacon’s  rejection  of  the  anti-

intellectualist fideism espoused by that author. In turn, we should perhaps consider that, 

throughout  the  16

th

  century,  skepticism  was  frequently  the  subject  of  a  literary 



                                                 

63

 See GRANADA. OLIVEIRA (2007, p. 536.77) holds that Bacon’s work would be a “fundamental link between the 



kind of skeptical perspective developed by the generation of Montaigne and Sanchez and that later espoused by the 

founders of the Royal Society.”  

64

 See Sp III, p. 536.  






Dostları ilə paylaş:
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   10   11


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©genderi.org 2017
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə