Mbs working Paper idrak



Yüklə 268,58 Kb.

səhifə1/11
tarix05.10.2017
ölçüsü268,58 Kb.
  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   10   11


A METHODOLOGY TO EVALUATE THE USABILITY OF 

DIGITAL SOCIALIZATION IN ‘VIRTUAL’ 

ENGINEERING DESIGN  

MBS WORKING PAPER 

Accepted to Appear  in Research in Engineering Design. Theory, Applications, and Concurrent 

Engineering 

Amjad El-Tayeh,

1

 Nuno Gil (corresponding author),

2

 and Jim Freeman

3

 

ABSTRACT 

We  develop  a  methodology  to  evaluate  the  usability  of  prototypes  for  supporting  digital 

socialization within geographically-dispersed, or ‘virtual,’ engineering design teams. Socialization 

converts  individual  into  group  tacit  knowledge  to  enhance  collaborative  work.  Extant  theory  in 

computer-supported collaborative work (CSCW) underpins IDRAK, a proof-of-concept prototype 

of a Rich Internet Application to promote socialization. Our methodology employs an engineering 

design  exercise  (Delta  design,  Bucciarelli  1994)  to  simulate  -  in  a  computer  lab  -  a  virtual  team 

undertaking  a  project  feasibility  stage.  We  apply  this  methodology  to  evaluate  the  usability  of 

IDRAK to support ‘virtual’ four-people teams (architect, project manager, thermal and structural 

engineers). Our findings yield few statistically significant differences between the performance of 

virtual  and  co-located  teams.  The  experiments  suggest  that  IDRAK  encourages  individuals  to 

work collaboratively. It allows for a leveling of status and eases communication since individuals’ 

accents are not an issue. However, IDRAK makes it difficult for the project manager to exercise 

authority  and  it  cannot  capture  nuances  in  speech  such  as  tone  and  expression.  The  experiments 

suggest that more research is needed to explore how to enhance the performance of virtual teams 

by,  first,  alternating  between  voice/video  and  text-based  chat;  second,  documenting  chat-based 

conversations; and third, enforcing communication and design process protocols. 

                                                 

1

  

School of Business Administration, American University in Dubai, UAE, Email: aeltayeh@aud.edu 



2

  

Manchester  Business  School,  The  University    of  Manchester,  Booth  Street  West,  Manchester,  M15  6PB,  UK, 



Email: nuno.gil@mbs.ac.uk, Tel +44 161 3063486 

3

      Manchester Business School, The University  of Manchester, UK



 


 



1

 

INTRODUCTION 

Cacciatori and Jacobides (2005) study of the construction sector in the UK shows how the division 

of labor between the different ypes of organizational participant s(architects, engineerg, contracto) 

led to the neglect of areas that feel between the parts, suggesting the need for reintegrate d sets of 

solutions  , a structure supporting knowledge accumulation in a mor efficient way  

Cacciatori, E. and Jacobides, M.G. (2005). “The Dynamics Limits of Specialization: Veticla 

Ingration Reconsiderd,” Organization Studies, 26 (12) 1851-1883. 

Each organization represented solidification of knowledge bases, fragmentation set the path that 

shaped theknowleedge bases 

Research  in  engineering  design  has long  emphasized the  importance  of knowledge  sharing (e.g., 

Schön 1983, Poli et al. 1992, Konda et al. 1992, Dym 1994, Zaychik and Regli 2003, McMahon et 

al. 2004, Sim and Duffy 2004). Exchanges of knowledge from the early design stages can improve 

team  performance  and  increase  the  quality  of  product  design  (Poli  et  al.  1992).  A  simplistic 

dichotomy differentiates tacit from explicit knowledge. Tacit knowledge is intuitive, experimental, 

and  based  on  heuristics,  whereas  explicit  knowledge  is  structured  and  coded  in  formal  ways 

(Nonaka et al. 2000). The interaction between tacit and explicit knowledge is the basis of Nonaka 

et  al.’s  (2000)  knowledge  creation  theory.  Socialization  is  the  process  of  converting  individual 

tacit knowledge into group tacit knowledge without attempting a priori, to codify, or externalize

knowledge.  Socialization  includes  conversations,  apprenticeships,  and  storytelling.  It  helps 

individuals  develop  a  sense  of  community  of  practice  (Brown  and  Duguid  1991)  and  ‘common 

ground’,  i.e.,  mutual  knowledge,  beliefs  and  assumptions  between  conversants  (Clark  and 

Schaefer 1989).  

One stream of work investigates how best to transform tacit knowledge of engineering design 

into computer tools (e.g., Poli et al. 1992, Konda et al. 1992, Korman et al. 2003, McMahon et al. 

2004).  The logic  underlying  this approach assumes  that individuals  voluntarily contribute  know-

how into — and retrieve it from — digital repositories. Research suggests, however, that there are 

limits  to  the  extent  tacit  knowledge  can  be  codified  (Schön  1983,  Dym  1994,  McDermott  1999, 



 

Clases and Wehner 2002). Tacit knowledge can be inseparable from people’s everyday actions as 

it is expressed directly through such actions and embedded in work practices (Orlikowski 2000). 

Other  limitations  include:  the  failure  of  knowledge  databases  in  encouraging  people  to  think 

together  and  share  insights  (McDermott  1999);  difficulties  in  capturing  the  contexts  in  which 

know-how is embedded (Erickson and Kellog 2000); and lack of users’ time in searching for and 

contributing know-how to databases (McDermott 1999). 

Another stream of work advocates that efforts to codify knowledge need to be complemented 

with  mechanisms  that  can  facilitate  the  voluntary  coming  together  of  people  to  socialize  and 

negotiate  shared  meanings  (Konda  et  al.  1992).  This  requirement  is  not  trivial  to  operationalize, 

however,  when  teams  are  geographically  dispersed.  First,  face-to-face  meetings  can  be  hard  to 

timetable and costly to organize. Second, video-audio calls rarely support asynchronous exchange 

of  know-how  and  have  limited  capabilities  to  disseminate  know-how  outside  the  conversation 

loop  (Erickson  and  Kellogg  2000).  And  third,  most  web-based  systems  for  supporting 

socialization  (e.g.,  e-mail,  chat  rooms,  bulletin  boards,  and  discussion  forums)  take  for  granted 

that  participants  interact  because  the  environment  makes  it  technologically  possible,  while 

neglecting the social dimension of interaction (Erickson and Kellogg 2000, Kreijns et al. 2003) .– 

or as Erickson and Kellogg (2000) would have it “in the digital world we are socially blind.” 

Admittedly,  software  providers  are  constantly  developing  more  sophisticated  systems  to 

support socialization. Recent developments – some of which were unknown when we started this 

work  in  2004  -  include  Groove.net  (proprietary  peer-to-peer  software  to  create  virtual 

workspaces),  SKYPE  (proprietary  peer-to-peer  Internet  telephony  service),  and  MSN  messenger 

(freeware  instant  messaging  service).  Empirical  observations  of  work  practices  at  one  of  the 

engineering  design  consultants  sponsoring  this  research  (MWH,  ARUP)  suggest  that  these  new 

systems tend to become rapidly adopted. Virtual teams are formed as consultants outsource work 





Dostları ilə paylaş:
  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   10   11


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©genderi.org 2019
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə