Microsoft Word Design Glo Kongre doc



Yüklə 5,01 Kb.

səhifə1/77
tarix12.10.2018
ölçüsü5,01 Kb.
  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   77


 
QLOBALLAŞMA PROSESĐNDƏ  
QAFQAZ VƏ MƏRKƏZĐ ASĐYA  
ĐQTĐSADĐ VƏ BEYNƏLXALQ MÜNASĐBƏTLƏR 
II BEYNƏLXALQ KONQRESĐ 
 
 
İQTİSADİYYAT BÖLMƏSİ 
  
QAFQAZ VƏ MƏRKƏZİ ASİYA ENERJİ 
LAYİHƏLƏRİ


 
 
284 
COMPERATIVE ANALYSIS OF  RUSSIAN AND AZERBAIJAN TAX SYSTEMS IN 
THE CONTEXT OF INVESTMENT CLIMATE AND ENERGY POLITICS 
Prof. Dr. Süreyya SAKINÇ  
Celal Bayar University, The Faculty of  Economics and  
Administrative Sciences, Public Finance Department, 
Manisa-TURKEY 
sureyya.sakinc@bayar.edu.tr 
Asst. Prof. Dr. Birol KOVANCILAR 
Celal Bayar University, The Faculty of  Economics and  
Administrative Sciences, Public Finance Department, 
Manisa-TURKEY 
bkovancilar@yahoo.com 
ABSTRACT 
Russia  and  Azerbaijan  are    important  countries  to  world  energy  markets.    Russia  holds  the  world's  largest  natural  gas 
reserves, the second largest coal reserves, and the eighth largest oil reserves. Azerbaijan also have rich oil and natural gas reserves 
in the Caspian Sea basin. Because of these potentials, these two countries are attracting  foreign investors interest. 
Emprical studies generally find that Foreign Direct Investment (FDI) choices   are affected by tax systems of countries.The 
paper  will  evaluate  and  analysis  the    tax  systems  of    Russia  and  Azerbaijan  in  the  context  of    investment  climate  and  energy 
politics. The design of  a tax system have significant economic impacts and influence multinationals in deciding where to invest. 
Tax  regimes  with  relatively  high  marginal  rates  and  which  include  a  number  of  exemptions  and  allowances  tend  to  be  less 
economically efficient  in relation to efficient use of energy sources and  encouraging investments. 
In these context, we will analysis the tax systems of these countries  by using some fiscal parameters in which tax incentives, 
tax rates, tax compositions, structure of tax administration, redtype, tax exemptions etc.  
Finally we will discuss some suggestions and key actions for governments of Russia and Azerbaijan to  find  more business 
friendly and efficient type tax systems . 
Key Words: Tax system, tax policy, Azerbaijan, Russia, energy politics, foreign direct investments 
 
 
1. INTRODUCTION AND SUMMARY 
Russia  and  Azerbaijan  are  large  producers  of 
oil and gas. Russia’s economy is heavily dependent 
on oil and natural gas exports. Russia is important 
to  world  energy  markets  because  it  holds  the 
world's  largest  natural  gas  reserves,  the  second 
largest  coal  reserves,  and  the  eighth  largest  oil 
reserves. Russia is also the world's largest exporter 
of natural gas, the second largest oil exporter, and 
the  third  largest  energy  consumer.
1
 Besides, 
Russia’s  natural  gas  industry  has  not  been  as 
successful as its oil industry, with both natural gas 
production  and  consumption  remaining  relatively 
flat since independence.  
Their  rich  natural  resources  make  these 
countries  potentially  vulnerable  to  what  is  called 
the  “Dutch  Disease”  –potentially  negative  effects 
of  an  inadequately  managed  natural  resource 
boom  that  in  case  a  reource-rich  economy  may 
suffer its natural wealth. The risks associated with 
the  Dutch  Disease  are  particularly  imminent  in 
Azerbaijan. 
                                                 
1
   US  Energy  Information  Administration,  http://www.eia. 
doe.gov/emeu/cabs/russia.html. (22/03/2007) 
Since  2003,  Russia  has  attracted  increased 
mounts of foreign direct investment (FDI), which 
reached record levels in 2004 and 2005. However, 
the share of FDI in domestic capital formation still 
remains low by international comparison. In 2005 
the manufacturing sector attracted the largest FDI 
share and the energy sector absorbed one third of 
inflows, but Russia’s service sectors have not yet 
benefited from significant FDI.
2
   
This  paper  analysis  current  tax  systems  of 
Russian and Azerbaijan and explores how Russian 
and  Azerbaijan  tax  policies  may  affect  the 
investment  climate  and  energy  production  and 
consumption.  Part  2,  examines  energy  develop-
ments  and  FDI  inflows  in  Russia  Federation  and 
Azerbaijan  Republic.  Part  3,  gives  more  detailed 
overview  of  the  current  tax  regime  relevant  to 
investment  climate  and  business  environment. 
Finally,  policy  conclusions  deriving  from  the 
analysis and some recommendations are presented 
in Part 4. 
 
                                                 
2
   OECD,  Russian  Federation  –  Enhancing  Policy  Transpa-
rency, 2006, p.7. 


II International Congress
 
 
285 
2.  IMPORTANCE OF THE ENERGY 
SECTOR AND FDI IN RUSSIA 
FEDERATION AND AZERBAIJAN 
REPUBLIC   
Azerbaijan is endowed with large oil and gas 
resources,  estimated  at  7.0  billion  barrels  (0.6 
percent  of  proven  world  oil  reserves)  and  48.4 
trillion cubic feet (0.8 percent of proven world gas 
reserves),  respectively.  After  a  long  period  of 
decline  in  oil  production,  oil  output  started  to 
increase in mid-1990s, to reach 0.3 million barrels 
per day in 2003, and is expected to increase sharply 
in 2005, reaching a maximum of 1.3 million barrels 
per  day  in  2010.  This  boost  to  oil  production 
capacity  is  attributable  to  substantial  investments 
implemented  in  cooperation  with  international  oil 
companies during the last five years.
3
 
The  oil  sector  is  of  vital  importance  to  the 
Russian economy. Estimates vary considerably, but 
the World Bank has suggested that the oil and gas 
sector may have accounted for up to 25 percent of 
gross  domestic  product  (GDP)  in  2003—while 
employing less than one percent of the population.  
In 2003 35% of crude oil production was exported 
by pipeline.However the World Bank point out that 
official  data  shows  oil  and  gas  accounts  for  nine 
percent    This  apparent  anomaly  is  of  GDP,  while 
exports  of  this  sector  account  for  20  percent  of 
GDP explained by the World Bank as being due to 
transfer  pricing  –  illustrating  the  significance  of  
this problem.
4
 
Azerbaijan  has  been  one  of  the  most 
successful CIS countries in attracting FDI mainly 
due  to  its  significant  oil  and  gas  reserves,  with 
inward  FDI  flows  averaging  about  $900  million 
per year during 1997–2001 (equivalent to about 20 
percent  of  average  annual  GDP).  Inward  FDI 
flows,  mostly  into  the  oil  sector,  accounted  for 
about 70 percent of gross capital formation during 
this  period.
5
 In  Russia,  the  very  low  levels  of 
inward FDI flows reflect the slow pace of reforms. 
Inward  FDI  flows  into  Russia  grew  from  $2.1 
billion in 1995 to $4.8 billion in 1997, fell to $2.5 
billion  in  1998 reflecting  the  financial  crisis,  and 
were  roughly  $3  billion  in  1999–2001,  implying 
that inward FDI flows have not reached their pre–
crisis  level.  In  the  1999–2001  period,  following 
the Russian crisis, inward FDI flows accounted for 
                                                 
3
   IMF,  Azerbaijan  Republic:  Selected  Issues,  IMF  Country 
Report No: 05/17,  January 2005, p.3. 
4
   Philiph  Daniel  &  Adrian  Fernando,  “Reforming  Taxation 
of  Oil  Sector  in  the  Russian  Federation”,    ITIC  Special 
Report,  December 2004, p.9. 
5
   Clinton R. Shiells, “FDI and the Investment Climate in the 
CIS  Countries”,  IMF  Policy  Discussion  Paper  PDP/03/5, 
November 2003, p.9. 
less than 10 percent of gross fixed investment, and 
FDI’s  contribution  to  economic  growth  was 
correspondingly limited.
6
 
In Russia, the economy is expected to expand 
by  6.5  percent  in  2007.  Azerbaijan's  GDP  is 
expected  to  grow  31.3  %  in  2007.  Azerbaijan 
possesses very rich natural resources, including the 
richest  resources  of  oil  and  gas  centralized  in  the 
Caspian  Sea.  Russia  and  Azerbaijan  are  relatively 
well-integrated  into  the  global  economy.  Higher 
global  energy  demand  continues  to  accelerate  at 
high  growth  rate  of these  countries  by  stimulating 
growth  in  other  economic  sectors.  Azerbaijan  has 
remained  largely  open  to  foreign  investment  and 
avoided tight state control over energy sectors and 
has  been  particularly  successful  in  attracting 
foreign  funds  by  opening  their  energy  sectors  to 
major Western companies. 
Empirical  studies  have  found  that  foreign 
investment in Russia was not driven primarily by 
demand but was highly responsive to indicators of 
reform  and  liberalisation,  including  those 
measuring  enterprise  reform,  competition  policy 
and  the  volume  of  foreign  exchange  and  tax 
collection. 
7
 The  Russian  investment  environment 
may also not be sufficiently competitive to attract 
adequate inflows from abroad.  
Main  part  of  foreign  investments  in  these 
countries  is  concentrated  in  the  energy  sector. 
Now  Azerbaijan  is  an  important  link  in  growing 
business  of  a  number  of  the  world’s  leading 
energy  companies  (BP,  Exxon  Mobil,  Chevron 
Texaco,  Elf  Total  Fina  and  etc.)  in  the  Caspian 
region.  Azerbaijan  was  applied  The  state 
Privatisation Programme for establishment of self-
regulated  market  economy  space  for  economic 
entities  based  on  private  ownership  and  free 
competition  and  restructuring  of  the  national 
economy  in  accordance  with  market-economy 
requirements  and  for  attraction  of  investments  to 
achieve efficiency of the privatised enterprises.  
According  to  an  comprehensive  analysis  of 
Russia’s  transition  process,  Russia’s  current 
growth  rates  can  be  attributed  neither  to  general 
success  of  transition  nor  to  Putin’s  reforms.  In 
fact,  Russia  seems  to  be  in  the  fortunate  position 
of  having  very  large  amounts  of  raw  materials 
(rising prices for crude oil, natural gas, coal, etc.) 
at  a  time  of  globally  rising  prices,  which  are 
currently driving the economy.
8
  
                                                 
6
   Shiells (2003), p.10. 
7
   Fabry N., Zeghni S. “Foreign Direct Investment in Russia: 
How the Investment Climate Matters”, Communist & Post-
Communist Studies 2002; 35: pp. 289-304. 
8
   Peter  Voigt,  “Russia’s  Way  From  Planning  Toward 
Market:  A  Success  Story?  A  Review  of  Economic 




Dostları ilə paylaş:
  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   77


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©genderi.org 2019
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə