Microsoft Word Harrison im final doc



Yüklə 95.13 Kb.

tarix25.07.2018
ölçüsü95.13 Kb.


 

 

J



OHN 

H

ARRISON



*

 

Robert Bork said there was an antitrust paradox.



1

 Was there 

a Robert Bork Paradox? 

Bork  was  not  a  legal  formalist.  He  was  not  a  textualist,  and 

he was an originalist only in a quite limited sense. He was also 

not himself a paradox. Bork’s thinking was systematic and con‐

sistent.  He  believed  that  principled  judging  consisted  in  the 

identification of values external to the judge and the derivation 

from those values, which might be quite abstract, of more spe‐

cific doctrines that would implement them. That process could 

be creative and would require many judgments, but it must not 

rest on the judge’s own values if it was to be neutral and prin‐

cipled, as to be legitimate it had to be. 

Bork  was  also  a  leading  figure  in  American  law,  and  here 

there is a paradox. The thinkers who are most closely identified 

as  his  followers  are  noteworthy  for  being  legal  formalists  and 

textualists.  They  generally  do  not  follow  Bork  by  thinking  of 

law  as  consisting  fundamentally  of  basic  values  from  which 

specific conclusions can be deduced or derived. 

This  Essay  will  describe  the  basic  structure  of  Bork’s  think‐

ing,  briefly  discuss  its  intellectual  origins  and  affinities,  and 

then  pose  and  address  the  paradox  that  his  followers  differ 

from him on seemingly basic issues. 

In  Neutral  Principles  and  Some  First  Amendment  Problems,

2

 

Bork proposed a free speech doctrine that, he acknowledged, 



was  far  from  the  Supreme  Court’s:  only  political  speech 

should be protected, and even such speech should not be pro‐

tected if it advocates violent overthrow of the government or 

                                                                                                         

* James  Madison  Professor  of  Law,  University  of  Virginia;  Law  Clerk,  Judge 

Robert  H.  Bork,  United  States  Court  of  Appeals  for  the  District  of  Columbia 

Circuit, 1982–1983.  

This essay deals with the substance of Judge Bork’s thought, and not with the 

Judge as an individual. By being about ideas, it is an instance of the principle that 

imitation  is  the  sincerest  form  of  flattery.  As  to  Robert  Bork  himself,  having  al‐

ready likened him to Socrates, Newton, and Gauss in this Journalsee John Harri‐

son, On The Hypotheses That Lie At the Foundations of Originalism, 31 H

ARV

.

 



J.L.

 

&



 

P

UB



.

 

P



OL



473 (2008), I could only repeat myself. 

1. R


OBERT 

H.

 



B

ORK


,

 

T



HE 

A

NTITRUST 



P

ARADOX


 (1978). 

2. Robert H. Bork, Neutral Principles and Some First Amendment Problems, 47 I

ND

.

 



L.J. 1 (1971).  


 

1246 


Harvard Journal of Law & Public Policy 

[Vol. 36 

the violation of any law.

3

 He did not rest that proposal on any 



strong  claim  about  the  text.  After  observing  that  the  First 

Amendment  need  not  be  an  absolute  because  “‘freedom  of 

speech’ may very well be a term referring to a defined or as‐

sumed scope of liberty,” Bork quickly turned from text to his‐

tory.

4

 He then just as immediately turned away from history, 



after  a single  paragraph  setting  out  the  claim  that  “the  fram‐

ers  seem  to  have  had  no  coherent  theory  of  free  speech  and 

appear not to have been overly concerned with the subject.”

5

 



Having dealt with text and history in just over a page, he con‐

cluded,  “We  are, then, forced to  construct  our own theory  of 

the constitutional protection of speech.”

6

 



Bork’s  theory  was  derived  from  two  propositions.  First,  the 

Constitution  contemplates  a  representative  democracy,  and 

second,  judges  must  be  principled.

7

  The  second  postulate  was 



the burden of the first part of the article, in which Bork found 

inherent in the Constitution a requirement that judges be neu‐

tral in the derivation, definition, and application of the princi‐

ples  they  employ.

8

  Judicial  neutrality,  he  found,  was  estab‐



lished not in the concept of the judicial power or the history of 

the Constitution, but in its “Madisonian” structure. A Madison‐

ian  system  avoids  either  minority  or  majority  tyranny  by  giv‐

ing  substantial  power  to  the  majority  while  preserving  basic 

rights for the minority.

9

 In such a system, the judges are simply 



imposing  their  own  values,  and  engaging  in  judicial  tyranny, 

unless they can derive their conclusions from the Constitution’s 

values and not simply their own.

10

 



He  was  as  unconcerned  with  text  or  history  in  deducing  a 

value of free speech as in deducing the requirement of princi‐

                                                                                                         

3. Id. at 20 (“I am led by the logic of the requirement that judges be principled to 

the  following  suggestions.  Constitutional  protection  should  be  accorded  only  to 

speech that is explicitly political . . . . Moreover, within that category of speech we 

ordinarily call political, there should be no constitutional obstruction to laws mak‐

ing  criminal  any  speech  that  advocates  forcible  overthrow  of  the  government  or 

the violation of any law.”). 

4. Id. at 21–22. 

5. Id. at 22. 

6. Id.  

7. Id. at 22–23. 

8. Id. at 7.  

9. Id. at 2–3.  

10. Id.  at  3  (noting  that  the  “Court’s  power  is  legitimate  only  if  it  has,  and  can 

demonstrate in reasoned opinions, that it has, a valid theory, derived from the Con‐

stitution, of the respective spheres of majority and minority freedom. If it does not 

have such a theory but merely imposes its own value choices, or worse yet if it pre‐

tends to have a theory but actually follows its own predilections, the Court violates 

the postulates of the Madisonian model that alone justifies its power.”). 



 

No. 3] 


In Memoriam 

1247 


pled judicial decisionmaking. What mattered was that the Con‐

stitution  creates  “a  representative  government,  a  form  of  gov‐

ernment that would be impossible without freedom to discuss 

government and its policies. Freedom for political speech could 

and  should  be  inferred  even  if  there  were  no  first  amend‐

ment.”


11

 That constitutional value provided judges with a prin‐

ciple  by  which  to  distinguish  political  speech  from  all  other 

forms  of  conduct,  and  hence  to  say  that  it  is  constitutionally 

protected without having to rest that judgment simply on their 

own beliefs.

12

  

One  reason  Neutral  Principles  gave  rise  to  so  much  contro‐



versy when Bork was nominated to the Supreme Court is that 

it  addressed  not  only  the  First  Amendment,  but  a  wide  range 

of controversial topics in constitutional law. On many of those 

topics, Bork directed withering criticism at the Supreme Court. 

He criticized Griswold v. Connecticut

13

 and Reynolds v. Sims,



14

 the 


substantive  results  of  which  turned  out  to  have  substantial 

popular support.

15

 On the most fraught issue of all, though, he 



was entirely orthodox as to the outcome: Brown v. Board of Edu‐

cation

16

 was right. Brown was right, and the scholar from whom 

Bork  had  borrowed  part  of  his  title,  Herbert  Wechsler,

17

  was 



wrong, because Brown could be derived by neutral principles.

18

 



It  could  be  derived,  not  by  careful  reading  of  the  text  or  long 

inquiry into the history, but from some basic facts and “purely 

juridical”  considerations.

19

    The  basic  fact  was  that  the  Equal 



Protection Clause was somehow about racial equality between 

blacks and whites.

20

 The purely juridical principle was that the 



courts are not permitted to choose one version of equality over 

another, because judges may not choose one gratification over 

another without a legal warrant, and the legal materials did not 

indicate  any  particular  conception  of  equality.  Hence,  the 

courts  had  to  use  a  general  principle  of  equality,  one  that  re‐

quired  both  physical  equality,  which  by  itself  would  permit 

separate‐but‐equal  schools,  and  also  psychological  equality, 

                                                                                                         

11. Id. at 23. 

12. Id. at 26. 

13. 381 U.S. 479 (1965). 

14 377 U.S. 533 (1964). 

15. Bork, supra note 1, at 7–19.  

16. 437 U.S. 483 (1954).  

17. See  Herbert  Wechsler,  Toward  Natural  Principles  of  Constitutional  Law,  73 

H

ARV



.

 

L.



 

R

EV



.

 

1



 

(1959). 


18. Bork, supra note 1, at 12–15. 

19. Id. at 15.  

20. Id. at 14.  



 

1248 


Harvard Journal of Law & Public Policy 

[Vol. 36 

which would forbid them and lead to Brown.

21

 The requirement 



of judicial neutrality, combined with the “impulse” of equality, 

banned segregated schools. Basic values plus judicial neutrality 

equals rigorous and principled constitutional decisionmaking. 

When he wrote Neutral Principles, Bork was a typical law pro‐

fessor  in  that  he  had  two  fields:  his  own,  and  constitutional 

law.  His  own  was  antitrust  law.  The  structure  of  his  thinking 

about  constitutional  law  is  virtually  identical  to  that  of  his 

thinking about the Sherman Act. In Bork’s view, that act’s basic 

impulse,  combined  with  the  requirement  that  judges  be  neu‐

tral,  yielded  a  quite  general  and  abstract  value  that  courts 

could  and  should  implement  through  elaboration,  that  was  at 

once  creative  and  principled.  From  the  various  values  that 

might be found in the Sherman Act, Bork selected one and only 

one:  maximizing  consumer  welfare.

22

  That  sole  value  should 



guide  the  courts,  he  argued,  because  implementing  the  others 

would require that judges make non‐neutral choices, preferring 

some  distributional  claims  over  others.

23

  Although  the  value 



was fixed and the reasoning was to be rigorous, the actual doc‐

trinal results would change over time as the economy changed 

and judges learned more about economics.

24

  



According  to  Bork,  the  Sherman  Act  was  a  directive  to  put 

into  practice  Chicago‐style  neoclassical  welfare  economics,  at 

least until some better form of economics came along. Bork re‐

alized that his interpretation required a distinctive understand‐

ing of the concept of restraint of trade, a term used in English 

and  American  common  law  in  a  way  that  had  no  particular 

connection  with  consumer  welfare.  Bork’s  derivation  of  that 

concept would horrify many textualists today:  

It is clear from the debates that ‘the common law’ relevant to 

the  Sherman  Act  is  an  artificial  construct,  made  up  for  the 

occasion out of a careful selection of recent decisions from a 

variety of jurisdictions plus a liberal admixture of the sena‐

tors’  own  policy  prescriptions.  It  is  to  this  ‘common  law,’ 

holding  sway  nowhere  but  in  the  debates  of  the  Fifty‐first 

                                                                                                         

21. Id. at 14–15. 

22 Robert H. Bork, The Rule of Reason and the Per Se Concept: Price Fixing and Mar‐

ket Division, 74 Y

ALE 


L.

 

J. 775, 781 (1965). 



23. Id. at 838–39. 

24. “Courts  charged  by  Congress  with  the  maximization  of  consumer  welfare 

are free to revise, not only prior judge‐made rules, but, it would seem, rules con‐

templated  by  Congress.”  Robert  H.  Bork,  Legislative  Intent  and  the  Policy  of  the 



Sherman Act, 9 J.

 

L.



 

&

 



E

CON


. 7, 48 (1966). 


 

No. 3] 


In Memoriam 

1249 


Congress,  that  one  must  look  to  understand  the  Sherman 

Act.


25

  

Today’s  intentionalists  should  not  conclude,  however,  that 



Bork  meant  to  endorse  inquiry  into  subjective  intention  in  any 

simple or ordinary sense. In his view, legislative intent was itself 

a  construct  that  had  to  be  used  with  care.

26

  Its  function  was  to 



give  judges  the  basic  value  from  which  to  reason.  With  that 

value  in  place,  the  antitrust  judge’s  “responsibility  is  nothing 

less  than  the  awesome  task  of  continually  creating  and  recreat‐

ing the Sherman Act out of his understanding of economics and 

his conception of the requirements of the judicial process.”

27

  



Bork is perhaps best known today as one of the founders of 

contemporary constitutional originalism. Originalism is itself a 

large‐scale  principle,  but  for  Bork  it  rested  on  the  more  basic 

requirement of judicial neutrality. Only adherence to the origi‐

nal understanding, he argued, can make the Constitution “law 

that binds judges.”

28

 The requirement that judges be bound by 



law was the foundation of Bork’s originalism, as demonstrated 

by  his  claim  that  if  decision  according  to  the  original  under‐

standing  were  impossible,  the  only  alternative  would  be  to 

abandon  judicial  review  altogether.  Without  the  original  un‐

derstanding  to  guide  judges,  “the  choice  would  be  either  rule 

by judges according to their own desires, or rule by the people 

according  to  theirs.”

29

  For  Bork,  that  was  no  choice  at  all,  for 



reasons  on which  his  commitment to  the  original  understand‐

ing was founded. 

As  a  judge,  Bork  believed  that  his  job  was  to  turn  quite  ab‐

stract  values  into  determinate  but  possibly  mutable  doctrines 

through  principled  decisionmaking.  On  the  question  of  muta‐

bility, he clashed with then‐Judge Scalia in Ollman v. Evans,

30

 a 


defamation  case  that  the  D.C.  Circuit  decided  en  banc.  Bork 

argued  that  the  existing  common  law  privilege  for  statements 

of  opinion  was  inadequate  to  implement  the  First  Amend‐

                                                                                                         

25. Id. at 37. 

26. That  construct  had  to be  treated  gingerly because of  its  “inherent  artificial‐

ity.” Id. at 47. Its artificiality arose because “the attribution of any intent to a legis‐

lature  involves  a  number  of  problems  and  assumptions.”  Id.  at  7  n.2.  Bork  thus 

rejected any “attempt to describe the actual state of mind of each of the congress‐

men  who  voted  for  the  Sherman  Act,  but  merely  as  an  attempt  to  construct  the 

thing  call[ed]  ‘legislative  intent’  using  conventional  methods  of  collecting  and 

reconciling the evidence provided by the Congressional Record.” Id.  

27. Id. at 48.  

28. R


OBERT 

H.

 



B

ORK


,

 

T



HE 

T

EMPTING OF 



A

MERICA 


160 (1990). 

29. Id.  

30. 750 F.2d 970 (D.C. Cir. 1984) (en banc). 



 

1250 


Harvard Journal of Law & Public Policy 

[Vol. 36 

ment’s  values,  and  should  be  replaced  with  a  judicial  inquiry 

into  the  totality  of  the  circumstances  designed  to  ensure  ade‐

quate protection for free expression.

31

 His conclusion reflected, 



not a detailed inquiry into text or history, but the basic values 

as they applied to changing circumstances.

32

 

Although Judge Bork found history of little use in Ollman, he 



conducted  a  more  substantial  historical  inquiry  in  another  in‐

fluential  opinion,  his  concurrence  in  Tel‐Oren  v.  Libyan  Arab 



Republic.

33

  That  case  involved  Section  1350  of  Title  28  of  the 



United States Code, a descendant of a provision in Section 9 of 

the  Judiciary  Act  of  1789.  Bork’s historical  inquiry  was explic‐

itly  guided  and  bounded  by  a  principle  about  judicial  deci‐

sionmaking  that  he  derived  from  the  constitutional  structure. 

He began with a presumption against finding causes of action 

for  parties  like  the  plaintiffs  in  that  case.

34

  That  presumption 



came  from  a  structural  principle  governing  the  judicial  role: 

Courts  should  not  make  policy  choices  that  might  interfere 

with  American  foreign  policy.

35

  Neither  the  specific  presump‐



tion  nor  the  general  principle  appears  explicitly  in  the  text  of 

any of the sources Bork relied on, including of course the Con‐

stitution.  He  found  it,  not  in  any  particular  words,  but  in  the 

entire structure. 

Bork’s  view  that  scholars  and  judges  could  rigorously  de‐

duce powerful conclusions from a few general and basic prin‐

ciples in part reflected his time at the University of Chicago. In 

studying law and economics with  Aaron Director, Bork, as he 

described  it,  “underwent  what  can  only  be  called  a  religious 

                                                                                                         

31. Id. at 997 (Bork, J., concurring). 

32. “We know very little of the precise intentions of the framers and ratifiers of 

the  speech  and  press  clauses  of  the  first  amendment.  But  we  do  know  that  they 

gave into our keeping the value of preserving free expression and, in particular, 

the  preservation  of  political  expression,  which  is  commonly  conceded  to  be  the 

value  at  the  core  of  these  clauses.”  Id.  at  996. Bork  defended “evolving  constitu‐

tional doctrine” against then‐Judge Scalia’s objections. Id. at 995. Judge Scalia, in 

dissent, said that Bork was not engaged in the “application of existing principles 

to new phenomena . . . but rather alteration of preexisting principles in their appli‐

cation  to  preexisting  phenomena  on  the  basis  of  judicial  perception  of  changed 

social circumstances.” Id. at 1038 n. 2 (Scalia, J., dissenting).  

33. 726 F.2d 774 (D.C. Cir. 1984). 

34. The presumption arose from Bork’s requirement that any cause of action for 

a plaintiff like tel‐Oren be explicit and not implied. See id. at 801 (Bork, J., concur‐

ring)  (stating,  “For  reasons  I  will  develop,  it  is  essential  that  there  be  an  explicit 

cause of action before a private plaintiff be allowed to enforce principles of inter‐

national law in a federal tribunal.”).  

35. Id. at 801–02. Bork derived his presumption from general principles of sepa‐

ration of powers and analogies to related doctrines like the act of state and politi‐

cal  question  doctrines.  He  did  not  argue  that  any  existing  doctrine  required  his 

conclusion. Id. 



 

No. 3] 


In Memoriam 

1251 


conversion.”

36

    The  economic  approach  represented  “an  enor‐



mously  rigorous  and  logical  way”  of  analyzing  problems.

37

 



Bork  was  proud  of  his  position  in  the  Chicago  tradition.  His 

turn to constitutional law, however, took place in New Haven, 

and  that  part  of  his  work  bears  some  of  the  hallmarks  of  the 

Yale Law School. His claim that free speech protections can be 

derived from structural features of the Constitution, for exam‐

ple,  echoes  that  of  Charles  Black.

38

  Indeed,  the  affinities  be‐



tween  Black  and  Bork  as  structural  thinkers  are  such  that  this 

Essay might well be titled, Structure and Relationship in the Legal 



Thought of Robert Bork.  

Although  there  are  clear  connections  between  Bork’s 

thoughts and those of his intellectual antecedents and contem‐

poraries, his successors present a paradox. Bork’s conception of 

law as consisting of basic values is anti‐formalist; it treats legal 

norms as transparent to their purposes. It is anti‐textualist; the 

specific words of enactments matter hardly at all. And history’s 

relevance to it is quite limited. 

Today, though, Bork’s most important followers in American 

constitutional  law  and  theory  are  generally  text‐formalists  of 

one  kind  or  another  who  rely  extensively  on  history.  If  Bork 

has  any  one  intellectual  heir  it  is  Judge  Frank  Easterbrook—a 

dominant figure in law and economics, a leading figure in con‐

stitutional law and theory, a judge on the Court of Appeals for 

the  Seventh  Circuit,  a  University  of  Chicago  graduate,  and 

former  Assistant  to  Solicitor  General  Bork.  Easterbrook  is 

probably  the  most  important  textualist  on  or  off  the  bench.

39

 



Two  of  Bork’s  former  law  clerks,  John  Manning  and  Steven 

Calabresi,  are  among  the  most  important  scholars  of  the  Con‐

stitution’s text and history.

40

 All three are formalists in that all 



                                                                                                         

36. Edmund W. Kitch, ed., The Fire of Truth: A Remembrance of Law and Economics at 



Chicago, 1932–1970, 26 J.

 

L.



 

&

 



E

CON


. 163, 183 (1983) (comment in discussion by Bork).  

37. Id. at 201. 

38. See  C

HARLES 


L.

 

B



LACK

,

 



J

R

.,



 

S

TRUCTURE 



AND 

R

ELATIONSHIP 



I

C



ONSTITUTIONAL 

L

AW 



39

 

(1969) (freedom of speech on questions of national poli‐



tics can be derived from the federal structure of the Union). 

39. See,  e.g.,  Caleb  Nelson,  What  Is  Textualism?  91  V

A

.

 



L.

 

R



EV

.  347,  347  (2005) 

(identifying Easterbrook as a leading textualist). 

40. Professor Manning has defended textualism as a methodology, seee.g., John 

F.  Manning,  Textualism  and  the  Equity  of  the  Statute,  101  C

OLUM


.

 

L.



 

R

EV



.  1(2001), 

has elaborated it, seee.g., John F. Manning, The Absurdity Doctrine, 116 H

ARV

.

 



L.

 

R



EV

. 2387 (2003), and has applied it to important issues, seee.g., John F. Manning, 



The  Eleventh  Amendment  and  the  Interpretation  of  Precise  Constitutional  Texts,  113 

Y

ALE 



L.J. 1663 (2004). Professor Calabresi has developed an account of the original 

understanding of the Fourteenth Amendment’s text as it applies to sex discrimi‐

nation, Steven G. Calabresi & Julia Rickert, Originalism and Sex Discrimination, 90 

T

EX



.

 

L.



 

R

EV



.

 

1



 

(2011),


 

and  interpretations  of  the  Constitution’s  structural  provi‐

 



 

1252 


Harvard Journal of Law & Public Policy 

[Vol. 36 

three  distinguish  sharply  between  the  content  of  legal  norms 

and their purposes or the values they reflect.  

Reading  those  scholars,  and  others  of  their  contemporaries 

who  might  be  thought  of  as  Borkian  originalists,  one  might 

think  that  they  were  followers,  not  of  Robert  Bork,  but  of 

Bork’s  own  constitutional  law  teacher,  William  Winslow 

Crosskey. The first two volumes of Crosskey’s great work, Poli‐

tics and the Constitution In the History of the United States, have as 

their epigraph Justice Holmes’ formulation of objective textual 

interpretation:  “We  ask,  not  what  this  man  meant,  but  what 

those words would mean in the mouth of a normal speaker of 

English,  using  them  in  the  circumstances  in  which  they  were 

used.”


41

  But  unlike  scholars  like  Easterbrook,  Manning,  and 

Calabresi,  Bork  was  in  no  sense  a  Crosskeyite.  His  methodol‐

ogy  was  fundamentally  different  from  his  teacher’s,  and  my 

impression is that in Bork’s view Crosskey was, to put it gently, 

highly eccentric. 

The  paradox  is  that  Bork’s  closest  and  most  prominent  fol‐

lowers are not Borkians in fundamental ways. The resolution of 

the paradox, insofar as there is one, is to be sought in the com‐

mon  impulse,  as  it  were,  behind  Bork  and  his  followers.  That 

impulse is the conviction that law is objective. In particular, it is 

the convention that law is distinct from the normative views of 

those  who  implement  it.  The  interpreter’s  task  is  to  find  out 

what the law is, not to discover that it is the best that it can be. 

Formalists find objectivity in rules as opposed to the reasons 

for having them, and textualists find it in the meaning of words 

rather than speakers. Robert Bork found it elsewhere, in values 

and  purposes  that  were  posited  by  and  for—but  not  made  by 

or  for—judges.  Those  values  and  purposes,  he  thought,  gave 

the law its content and provided its justification. Quite possibly 

he thought that inquiry into formal rules, and close readings of 

texts, were often nothing but a game, a distraction from the real 

point of law. I would say that law is fundamentally about rules. 

For  that  reason,  as  another  of  Bork’s  colleagues  from  Yale  in 

the 1970s said, if law is not a game, it is not not a game either.

42

 



                                                                                                         

sions based on close readings of the text, seee.g., Steven G. Calabresi & Kevin H. 

Rhodes, The Structural Constitution: Unitary Executive, Plural Judiciary, 105 H

ARV


.

 

L.



 

R

EV



. 1153 (1992). 

41. W


ILLIAM 

W

INSLOW 



C

ROSSKEY


,

 

I



 

P

OLITICS  AND  THE 



C

ONSTITUTION  IN  THE 

H

ISTORY OF THE 



U

NITED 


S

TATES


 ii (1953).  

42. Arthur Allen Leff, Law and, 87 Y



ALE 

L.

 



J. 989, 1005 (1978).  



Dostları ilə paylaş:


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©genderi.org 2017
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə