Microsoft Word Ksi\271\277ka abstrakt\363w doc



Yüklə 20,03 Mb.
Pdf görüntüsü
səhifə118/173
tarix17.11.2018
ölçüsü20,03 Mb.
#80416
1   ...   114   115   116   117   118   119   120   121   ...   173

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
XIV
h
 International Conference on Molecular Spectroscopy, Białka Tatrzańska 2017
 
246
T2: P–31 
Molecular spectroscopy in vitro studies of nitrosylmethaemoglobin 
(Hb
III
NO) – in search of spectral biomarkers and physiological 
importance 
 
Jakub Dybas
1,2,3
, P. Berkowicz
2
, Małgorzata Barańska
1,2
,  
Katarzyna M. Marzec
2,3
, and Stefan Chlopicki
2,4
 
 

Faculty of Chemistry, Jagiellonian University, Ingardena 3, Krakow, Poland 

Jagiellonian Centre for Experimental Therapeutics (JCET), Jagiellonian University, Bobrzynskiego 
14, Krakow, Poland, e-mail: katarzyna.marzec@jcet.eu, stefan.chlopicki@jcet.eu 

Center for Medical Genomics OMICRON, Jagiellonian University, Collegium Medicum, Kopernika 
7c, Krakow, Poland. 

Chair of Pharmacology, Jagiellonian University Medical College, Grzegorzecka 16, Krakow, 
Poland 
 
 
Nitric  oxide  (NO),  important  mediator  in  cardiovascular  homeostasis  involved  in  regulation  of 
vascular  tone,  angiogenesis  and  platelet  aggregation,  readily  interacts  with  the  iron  ion  of  haem 
proteins. In contrast to oxygen or carbon monoxide molecules, NO can react with both, ferrous (FeII) 
and ferric (FeIII) iron ion, leading to formation of HbII/III–NO adducts. Another pathway of haem–
NO  interaction  are  redox  reactions  in  which  methaemoglobin  (metHb)  and  NO3–  or 
deoxyhaemoglobin  (deoxyHb)  and  NO  are  formed.  All  of  these  interactions  are  being  regarded  as 
regulatory and may be complementary involved in the regulation of NO bioavailability. One of the 
most  intriguing  hypothesis  claims,  that  haemoglobin  may  stabilize  and  even  transport  NO.[1,2] 
Because  of  high  rate  constant  of  HbIINO  adduct  and  taking  into  consideration  lower  stability  of 
HbIIINO it was assumed, that HbIIINO may actually be considered as pool of labile NO source. 
 
To find out the importance and biological significant of HbIIINO we used three complementary 
techniques  for  Hb  state  analysis  such  as  Resonance  Raman  Spectroscopy  (RRS),  Electron 
Paramagnetic  Spectroscopy  (EPR)  and  UV-Vis  Absorption  Spectroscopy  to  detect  and  determine 
conditions  in  which  HbIIINO  is  formed  inside  functional  red  blood  cells  (RBCs).  As  a  reference 
method  we  used  Blood  Gas  Analysis  (BGA).  Human  blood  samples  were  collected  from  healthy 
volunteers  and  RBCs  were  isolated  on  the  same  day  and  measured  within  8  hours.  NO  was 
administered  with the  usage of NO donor, PAPA–NO with  15 min  half-time  of NO release. In  the 
biological part of the work we used Human Aortic Endothelial Cells (HAEC) stimulated with calcium 
ionophore  and  incubated  with  RBCs  in  physiological  conditions.  Such  obtained  samples  were 
measured with RRS and UV-Vis. 
 
In first part of the work we examined influence of oxygen saturation inside RBCs on formed Hb–
NO  adducts  after  addition  of  exogenous  NO  and  by  application  of  RRS  and  UV-Vis  methods  we 
proved  formation  of  HbIIINO  in  the  samples  with  high  oxygen  content.  Moreover  it  was  also 
confirmed directly by analysis of EPR results. In the second step, we took a trial to detect HbIIINO 
formed in vitro after incubation of RBCs with HAEC stimulated to produce NO. In obtained results 
we  saw  slight  changes  in  marker  band  positions,  which  were  not  present  when  inhibitor  of  NO 
production, L-NAME, were used on HAEC before stimulation them with calcium ionophore.  
 
In our work we demonstrated, that a full insight into haem-NO adducts may only be obtained with 
application of few complementary techniques and that vibrational spectroscopy could also serve as a 
model  in  later  biological  studies.  The  mechanism  of  NO  action  in  human  body  still  remains 
ambiguous and our confirmation of HbIIINO formation in physiological conditions indicate a novel 
role of haem-NO interactions in cardiovascular homeostasis. 
 
Keywords: nitric oxide; red blood cells; nitrosylmetheamoglobin; haem-NO adducts   
 
Acknowledgment 
This work was supported by the Polish Ministry of Science and Higher Education (grant No IP2015 048474) and 
National Center of Science (DEC-2013/08/A/ST4/00308) 
 
References  
[1]  D.B. Kim-Shapiro, A.N. Schechter, M.T. Gladwin, Arterioscler. Thromb. Vasc. Biol. 26 (2006) 697. 
[2]  C. Liu, W. Zhao, G.J. Christ, M.T. Gladwin, D.B. Kim-Shapiro, Free Radic. Biol. Med. 65 (2013) 1164. 


 
 
 
 
 
 
 
XIV
h
 International Conference on Molecular Spectroscopy, Białka Tatrzańska 2017
 
 
247
T2: P–32 
FTIR and Raman – based biochemical profiling of lungs in  early stages 
of pulmonary metastases in murine model of breast cancer 
 
Karolina Chrabaszcz
1,2,3
, Jakub Dybas
1,2,3
, Kamila Kochan
4

Andrzej Fedorowicz
1
, Agnieszka Jasztal
1
, Elżbieta Buczek
1
, Kamilla Malek
3

Stefan Chlopicki
1,5
, and Katarzyna M. Marzec
1,2
 
 

Jagiellonian Center for Experimental Therapeutics, Jagiellonian University, Krakow, Poland, 
e-mail: katarzyna.marzec@jcet.eu 

Center for Medical Genomics OMICRON, Jagiellonian University, Collegium Medicum Krakow, Poland 

Faculty of Chemistry, Jagiellonian University Krakow, Poland 

Centre for Biospectroscopy, School of Chemistry, Monash University, Australia 

Chair of Pharmacology, Jagiellonian University Medical College, Krakow, Poland 
 
 
Raman  and  IR  spectroscopies  have  been  already  used  for  the  lung  tissue  content  measurement  and 
analysis1  as  well  as  for  the  visualization  of  the  changes  in  the  tissue  composition  which  occurs  during 
lungmetastasis2.In this studies we report on  a potential of those techniques for studies of the pulmonary 
lipid interstitial fibroblasts (LIFs) content occurring along witha changes of the biochemical profile typical 
for the early stage of lung metastasis. 
 
The  chosen  areas  of  the  cross  sections  of  the  lung  from  control  BALB/c  mice  and  BALB/c  mice  2 
weeks after ortothropic injection of 4T1 breasts cancer cells were studied with the use of Raman imaging 
with  532  nm  excitation  laser  wavelength,  FTIR  spectroscopy  and  chemometric  methods.  Measurements 
were performed for 5 μm thick, frozen, cross-sections of lungs taken from different heights of murine left 
lung (top, middle and bottom part of organ) and put on CaF
2
 slides.  
 
Studies  carried  out  with  those  two  techniques  allowed  for  ex  vivorecognition  of  the  distribution  of 
vitamin A as well as semi-quantitative analysis of the content present in LIFs. Moreover, it was possible to 
observe changes of biochemical profile under the influence of cancer disease (semi-quantitative information 
about a level of nuclei acids, carbohydrates including glycogen, lipids and changes in secondary structures 
of tissue proteins).Furthermore, it can be suggested that a decrease in the endogenous retinoids content in 
combination with a decrease lipid fraction and increase of glycogen in lungs could be a potential biomarker 
of the early phases of pulmonary  metastases in murine model of metastatic breast cancer. 
 
Fig. 1. (A) Microphotographs of the cross section of murine lung with labelled investigated areas (170x170 µm). Analysis of 
intergral intensity of: CH stretching band in the region 2800-3050 cm-1 showing organic matter (B); a band centered at 751 cm
–1
 
(Hb inside red blood cells – RBCs); (C) a band centered at 1202 cm
–1
 reveal vitamin A (D). The KMC results (1E–2E) with the 
average Raman spectrum for section (1A–2A) were presented for main classes including vitamin A (green), tissue (grey) and haem 
from RBCs (red). Figure 1F and 2F corresponds with pure class of vitamin A extracted from KCM analysis. 
 
Keywords: lung cancer; metastasis; Raman and IR spectroscopy; lipofibroblasts 
 
Acknowledgment 
This work was supported by the Polish Ministry of Science and Higher Education (grant No IP2015 048474) and 
METENDOPHA-STRATEGMED1/233226/NCBR/2015. 
 
References  
[1]  K.M. Marzec, K. Kochan, A. Federowicz, A. Jasztal, K. Chruszcz-Lipska, J.C. Dobrowolski, S. Chlopicki, 
M. Baranska, Analyst. 140 (2015) 2171. 
[2]  T. Bhattacharjee, S. Tawde, R. Hudlikar, M. Mahimkar, G. Maru, A. Ingle, C. Murali Krishna, J. Biomed. 
Opt. 20 (2015) 85006. 



Yüklə 20,03 Mb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:
1   ...   114   115   116   117   118   119   120   121   ...   173




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©genderi.org 2022
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə