Microsoft Word Ksi\271\277ka abstrakt\363w doc



Yüklə 20,03 Mb.
Pdf görüntüsü
səhifə34/173
tarix17.11.2018
ölçüsü20,03 Mb.
#80416
1   ...   30   31   32   33   34   35   36   37   ...   173

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
XIV
h
 International Conference on Molecular Spectroscopy, Białka Tatrzańska 2017
 
72 
T2: O–4 
Raman studies on prostate cancer cells treated with clinical doses of 
ionizing radiation 
 
Maciej Roman
1
, Agnieszka Panek
1
, Joanna Wiltowska-Zuber
1
,  
and Wojciech M. Kwiatek
1
 
 

The Henryk Niewodniczanski Institute of Nuclear Physics, Polish  Academy of  Sciences, 
Radzikowskiego 152, 31-342 Krakow, Poland, e-mail: maciej.roman@ifj.edu.pl 
 
 
All living organisms are exposed to radiation all the time through natural sources like cosmic rays 
and terrestrial sources such as radon, thorium or uranium. Since radiation has direct impact on tissues 
and cells, it has been successfully applied for cancer treatment and diagnosis. Indeed, radiation shows 
a negative effect on molecules especially on DNA, where the genetic information is stored. Thus, it is 
of  great  importance  to  follow  changes  in  DNA  caused  by  radiation  in  terms  of  cell  function, 
reproducibility, and death [1, 2]. Furthermore, the influence of ionizing radiation on whole organisms 
can be  followed by studying  processes at the cellular and  molecular level.  The cellular response  to 
radiation depends on the radiation type, LET (Linear Energy Transfer), dose, dose rate, and cell type 
[2, 3]. However, the present knowledge about these processes is still incomplete and therefore there is 
necessity  for  further  detailed  studies.  Especially  in  radiobiology,  it  is  of  great  importance  to 
understand how radiation interacts with tissues and cells. Due to existence of radioadaptive response 
[4,  5]  or  bystander  effects  [6],  researchers  still  investigate  effects  of  low  dosages  for  radiotherapy 
reasons. 
 
In our study, we would like to shed new light on molecular damages and repairs in cells caused by 
ionizing  radiation.  Our  research  was  mainly  focused  on  changes  in  DNA,  but  also  other  cellular 
components such as lipids and proteins. Studies were performed on PC-3 cell line, which is a human 
prostate cancer line derived from bone metastasis. For the first approach the cells were irradiated with 
X-rays (as reference radiation) then with protons. Due to the variable response of cells in the low and 
high radiation doses we tested various doses of the X-ray irradiation to observe chemical changes in 
cells.  It  seems  vitally  important  to  assess  cellular  response  (including  DNA  damage)  to  X-ray 
radiation in a range of relevant cell lines in order to provide systematic high-resolution information to 
develop a rigorous theory of ion radiation action at the cellular and molecular level. Thus, the main 
objective  of  this  research  was,  therefore,  to  study  the  basic  mechanisms  underlying  the  biological 
effects brought about by protons that are of relevance for the functions of cancer and healthy cells. 
Furthermore,  aim  of  the  study  was  to  investigate  low  dose  of  ionizing  radiation  influence  on 
biological  systems  at  the  cellular,  sub-cellular  and  molecular  level  by  means  of  selected  non-
destructive spectroscopic methods. Due to rapid development of vibrational spectroscopy techniques 
such as mapping  and  3D  imaging, it is an excellent  chance to get new information about  nature of 
radiation-induced  damage  and  its  spatial  distribution  in  cells  using  Raman  spectroscopy  with 
micrometric scale resolution. 
 
Keywords: Raman spectroscopy; ionizing radiation; prostate cancer 
 
Acknowledgment 
This work was supported by the National Science Center, Poland (Grant No. 2015/19/D/ST4/01943). The research 
was  partially  performed  using  equipment  purchased  in  the  frame  of  the  project  co-funded  by  the  Małopolska 
Regional Operational Programme Measure 5.1 Krakow Metropolitan  Area  as  an important  hub of  the European 
Research Area for 2007–2013, project No. MRPO.05.01.00-12-013/15. 
 
References  
[1]  R.L. Warters, K.G. Hofer, Radiat. Res. 69 (1977) 348. 
[2]  B.G. Wouters, Basic Clinical Radiobiology 27 (2009). 
[3]  K.M. Prise, G. Schettino, M. Folkard, K.D. Held, Lancet oncol. 6 (2005) 520. 
[4]  G. Olivieri, J. Bodycote, S. Wolff, Science 223, (1984) 594. 
[5]  K. Ishii, J. Misonoh, Physiol. Chem. Phys. Me. 28 (1996) 83. 
[6]  E. Pasquali, P. Giardullo, S. Leonardi, M. Tanori, V. Di Majo, S. Pazzaglia, A. Saran, Curr. Mol. Med. 12 
(2012) 613. 


 
 
 
 
 
 
 
XIV
h
 International Conference on Molecular Spectroscopy, Białka Tatrzańska 2017
 
 
73
T2: O–5 
Binding mechanism of the antidiabetic drug, metformin with 
the digestive enzyme, pepsin: An experimental and theoretical study  
 
Mallika Pathak
1
, Deepti Sharma
2
, Himanshu Ojha
2
, and Rita Kakkar
3
 
 

Department of Chemistry, Miranda House, University of Delhi, Delhi 110054, India, 
e-mail: mallika.pathak@mirandahouse.ac.in 

Division of CBRN Defence, Institute of Nuclear Medicine and Allied Sciences,  Delhi 110054, India. 

Department of Chemistry, University of Delhi, Delhi 110054, India. 
 
 
Metformin is a frontline drug used to treat diabetes mellitus type-2 and is administered orally 
to the patients. Pepsin is an important enzyme that primarily functions as digestive enzyme. It is 
cause of concern that metformin being an orally administered drug may interact with pepsin  and 
consequently  affect  its  physiological  function.  This  may  result  into  serious  side  effects  like 
vomiting,  nausea  etc.  Therefore,  there  is  a  need  to  investigate  the  binding  mechanism  of 
metformin with pepsin.  
 
In  this  study,  the  binding  of  metformin  with  pepsin  has  been  studied  using  fluorescence 
spectroscopy, isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy and 
molecular modelling techniques.  
 
Fluorescence  results  showed  that  Stern  Volmer  constants  decreased  inversely  with 
temperature  thus  quenching  is  essentially  static  in  nature.  The  binding  constant  value  and 
stoichiometry  suggested that  binding forces  are  essentially  non-covalent in  nature and  there  is 
single class of binding sites. The conformational change in pepsin upon binding  was confirmed 
using change in CD spectra of pepsin in different concentrations of metformin. Thermodynamic 
investigations  revealed  that  the  binding  of  metformin  to  pepsin  was  driven  essentially  by 
favourable enthalpy and unfavourable entropy and the major driving forces are hydrogen bond 
and van der Waal forces. Molecular docking suggested that the binding of metformin to pepsin 
is  characterized  by  a  high  number  of  binding  sites.  Therefore,  metformin  binds  significantly 
with pepsin. 
 
Keywords: fluorescence quenching; isothermal titration calorimetry; circular dichroisim; pepsin; metformin 
 
Acknowledgment 
We  sincerely  thank  Dr  Pratibha  Jolly,  Principal  Investigator,  D.S.  Kothari  Centre  for  Research  and 
Innovation, Miranda House and Head, Department of Chemistry, University of Delhi for providing support 
and equipment facilities. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 



Yüklə 20,03 Mb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:
1   ...   30   31   32   33   34   35   36   37   ...   173




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©genderi.org 2022
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə