Microsoft Word Ksi\271\277ka abstrakt\363w doc



Yüklə 20,03 Mb.
Pdf görüntüsü
səhifə25/173
tarix17.11.2018
ölçüsü20,03 Mb.
#80416
1   ...   21   22   23   24   25   26   27   28   ...   173

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
XIV
h
 International Conference on Molecular Spectroscopy, Białka Tatrzańska 2017
 
 
51
T1: O–9 
The effect of annealing temperature on silicon oxycarbide obtained 
from 1,3,5,7,9,11,13,15-octakis(dimethylsilyloxy)pentacyclo 
[9.5.1.13,9.15, 15.17,13]octasiloxane-based polymers 
 
Wiktor Niemiec
1
, Przemysław Szczygieł
1
, Piotr Jeleń
1
, and Mirosław Handke
1
 
 

Faculty of Materials Science and Ceramics, AGH University of Science and Technology, 
Al.Mickiewicza 30, 30-059 Kraków, Poland, e-mail: wniemiec@agh.edu.pl 
 
 
Silicon  oxycarbide  is  a  material  combining  outstanding  thermal  resistance  with  good 
mechanical  properties  and  the  applicability  as  thin  coatings.  This  material  is  based  on 
amorphous SiO
2
 structure in which some of O
2–
 ion pairs are substituted for a single C
4–
 anion. 
Carbon  is  also  present  in  form  of  condensed  aromatic  rings,  which  form  “free  carbon”  phase. 
The only way of obtaining the silicon oxycarbide is the annealing of polymers containing Si-C 
and Si–O bonds in temperatures between 600 and 1000°C. These polymers can be either linear 
or  crosslinked  and  synthesized  in  a  number  of  ways  including  polycondensation  via  sol-gel 
method.  Usually  the  precursors  are  simple  D  (containing  two  alcoxy  and  two  alkyl  or  aryl 
groups), T (containing three alcoxy  and  one  alkyl  or aryl  group)  or  Q  (containing four  alcoxy 
groups) monomers. 
 
In  this  work  a  number  of  gels  were  obtained  from  1,3,5,7,9,11,13,15-octakis 
(dimethylsilyloxy)pentacyclo[9.5.1.13,9.15,15.17,13]octasiloxane.  The  hydrogen  in  Si–H  bond 
was substituted for ethoxy (or silanol) group using various catalysts with different efficiency and 
subsequently  polycondesated.  This  leads  to  materials  built  from  cubes  formed  from  eight  Q 
groups interlinked with bridges of two D groups. The materials were then annealed in 600, 700, 
800 and 900°C in argon atmosphere and their structure was investigated using IR, XRD and 
29
Si 
NMR  methods.  The  results  were  compared  with  materials  synthesized  from  other  monomers 
which also condensate to acquire gels with 1:1 silicon to carbon atom ratio, including equimolar 
tetraethoxysilane and diethoxydimethylsilane mixture and triethoxymethylsilane. 
 
Keywords: silicon oxycarbide; sol-gel; IR; XRD 
 
Acknowledgment 
Wiktor Niemiec would like to thank National Science Centre Poland for financial support in form of grant 
No. UMO-2014/13/D/ST8/03243. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 


 
 
 
 
 
 
 
XIV
h
 International Conference on Molecular Spectroscopy, Białka Tatrzańska 2017
 
52 
T1: O–10 
Raman imaging – a modern tool for 2D materials analysis 
 
Agnieszka Sozańska

 

Renishaw Sp z o.o., ul. Osmańska 12, 02-823 Warsaw, Poland, 
email: agnieszka.sozanska@renishaw.com 
  
 
Raman spectroscopy (and Raman imaging) has become a powerful, noninvasive method to 
characterize  graphene  and  related  materials.  A  large  amount  of  information  such  as  disorder, 
edge and grain boundaries, thickness, doping, strain and thermal conductivity  of graphene and 
other  2D  materials  can  be  learned  from  the  Raman  spectrum  and  its  behavior  under  varying 
physical conditions 
 
In  this  work  we  compare  and  contrast  the  different  solutions  for  maintaining  focus  and 
conducting  Raman imaging  on  2D materials  with  uneven, complex surfaces.  We  describe and 
illustrate the application of the new LiveTrack™ dynamic focus tracking technology, which not 
only  provides  in-focus  Raman  images  of  the  most  challenging  samples  but  also  topographic 
information, allowing three dimensional surface Raman images to be generated.  
We discuss and present data on a range of extremely difficult samples including graphene on a 
 
Cu foil, a sample that is rough on a micrometre length scale. We will demonstrate dynamic 
measurement  of  a  polyethylene  pellet  undergoing  phase  transitions  in  a  temperature  cell, 
demonstrating that LiveTrack can be used to maintain focus in moving systems.  
 
As a complete picture of novel 2D materials characterization (like ReS2) a new tool of low 
frequency Raman imaging will be shown, including share modes and breathing modes analysis. 
 
Keywords: Raman spectroscopy; 2D materials; imaging 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 


 
 
 
 
 
 
 
XIV
h
 International Conference on Molecular Spectroscopy, Białka Tatrzańska 2017
 
 
53
T1: O–11 
3D Ag nanosponge aggregate with incorporated testing adsorbates 
as a sample for effective SER(R)S spectral detection 
 
Veronika Sutrova
1,2
, Ivana Sloufova
1
, Martina Nevoralova
2
, and Blanka Vlckova
1
 
 

Department of Physical and Macromolecular chemistry, Charles University, Hlavova 2030/8, 
Prague, 128 43, Czech Republic, e+mail: sutrovav@natur.cuni.cz 

Department of Morphology and Rheology, Institute of Macromolecular chemistry ASCR, Heyrovsky 
Sq. 2, Prague, 162 06, Czech Republic 
  
 
Surface-enhanced  Raman  scattering  (SERS)  and  Surface-enhanced  resonance  Raman 
scattering  (SERRS)  are  well-known  spectro-analytical  methods,  which  utilize  enhancement  of 
Raman  scattering  by  plasmonic  metal  nanostructures,  e.g.  Ag  and  Au  nanoparticles  (NPs). 
Effective  localization  of  molecules  into  “hot  spots”  (i.e.  strong,  nanoscale  localized  optical 
fields generated in plasmonic metal nanostructures, such as nanoparticle (NP) assemblies, by an 
external  optical  excitation)  provides  large  enhancement  of  Raman  signal.  Presence  of  “hot 
spots” has been predicted and proved experimentally in fractal aggregates [1, 2] and in dimers of 
Ag NPs [3, 4]. Recently, we obtained strong indications about the presence of “hot spots” in 3D 
Ag nanosponge aggregates [5]. 
 
In  this  contribution,  we  report  preparation  and  SERS  spectral  investigation  of  3D  Ag 
nanosponge  aggregates,  which  were  assembled  from  2D  fused  fractal  aggregates  (D  =  1.87  ± 
0.02)  resulting  from  modification  of  AgNPs  hydrosol  by  Cl

  and  by  hydrophilic  [Ru(bpy)
3
]
2+
 
dication and hydrophobic fullerene C
60
 as the testing adsorbate.  
 
AgNPs  hydrosol  was  prepared  by  reduction  of  AgNO
3
  by  NH
2
OH∙HCl  [6].  For  SERS 
measurements, 3D Ag nanosponge aggregates with incorporated [Ru(bpy)
3
]
2+
 cations, fullerene 
C
60
 and chloride anions were prepared and overlayed by a thin layer of aqueous phase. 
 
SERS, SER(R)S and SERRS spectra were measured at 4 excitation wavelengths: 780, 633, 
532 and 445 nm, and the limits of [Ru(bpy)
3
]
2+
 and C
60
 spectral detection were determined. The 
limit  of  the  SERS  spectral  detection  of  fullerene  C
60
  (1×10
–6
 M)  at  all  excitation  wavelengths 
was higher than for [Ru(bpy)
3
]
2+
 cations. This is due to less effective incorporation of molecules 
of  fullerene  C
60
 into the  Ag  aggregate internal structure. The  limit  of the  SERRS  (1×10
–15
 M) 
and  SER(R)S  (1×10
–14
  M)  limits  of  detection  of  [Ru(bpy)
3
]
2+
    determined  at  445  and  532  nm 
excitations, respectively,  correspond to the single molecule level  of  the complex detection. Its 
achievement  is  attributed  to  a  large  electromagnetic  mechanism  enhancement  experienced  by 
[Ru(bpy)
3
]
2+
 incorporated into “hot spots”, to an efficient localization of “hot spots” in the 3D 
aggregate  to  the  focus  of  the  laser  beam  in  micro-Raman  spectral  measurements  and  to  a 
molecular resonance contribution to the overall enhancement. Another benefit for SERS/SERRS 
spectral measurements from the 3D Ag nanosponge aggregate is protection of the analyte (i.e. 
[Ru(bpy)
3
]
2+
, fullerene C
60
) against thermal decomposition by the thin aqueous phase overlayer. 
 
 
Keywords: Ag nanosponge; aggregate, [Ru(bpy)
3
]
2+
; fullerene; single-molecule detection 
 
Acknowledgment 
Financial  support  through  grants  892217  (GAUK),  17-05007S  (GACR),  TE01020118  (TACR)  and 
POLYMAT LO1507 (MSMT, NPU I) is gratefully acknowledged. 
 
References  
[1]  M.I. Stockman, V.M. Shalaev, M. Moskovits, R. Botet, T.F. George, Phys. Rev. B., 46 (1992) 2821. 
[2]  P. Zhang, T.L. Haslett, C. Douketis, M. Moskovits, Phys. Rev. B. 57 (1998) 15513. 
[3]  H. Xu, J. Aizpurua, M. Käll, P. Apell, Phys. Rev. E., 62 (2000) 4318. 
[4]  B. Vlčková, M. Moskovits, I. Pavel, K. Šišková, M. Sládková, M. Šlouf, Chem.Phys.Lett. 455 (2008) 
131. 
[5]   V. Sutrová, I. Šloufová, M. Nevoralová, B. Vlčková, J. Raman. Spectr., 46 (2015) 559. 
[6]  N. Leopold, B. Lendl J. Phys. Chem. B 107 (2003) 5273. 



Yüklə 20,03 Mb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:
1   ...   21   22   23   24   25   26   27   28   ...   173




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©genderi.org 2022
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə