Military Medicine International Journal of amsus raising the bar: extremity trauma care guest editors



Yüklə 1,64 Mb.

səhifə3/63
tarix14.06.2018
ölçüsü1,64 Mb.
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   63

MILITARY MEDICINE, 181, 11/12:3, 2016

The Extremity Trauma and Amputation Center of Excellence:

Overview of the Research and Surveillance Division

Christopher A. Rábago, PT, PhD*†; Mary Clouser, PhD*‡; Christopher L. Dearth, PhD*§;

Shawn Farrokhi, PT, PhD*∥; Michael R. Galarneau, MS, EMT*‡; CPT M. Jason Highsmith, SP USAR*¶**††;

Jason M. Wilken, PT, PhD*†; Marilynn P. Wyatt, PT, MA∥; LTC Owen T. Hill, SP USA*†

ABSTRACT Congress authorized creation of the Extremity Trauma and Amputation Center of Excellence (EACE)

as part of the 2009 National Defense Authorization Act. The legislation mandated the Department of Defense (DoD)

and Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) to implement a comprehensive plan and strategy for the mitigation, treat-

ment, and rehabilitation of traumatic extremity injuries and amputation. The EACE also was tasked with conducting

clinically relevant research, fostering collaborations, and building partnerships across multidisciplinary international,

federal, and academic networks to optimize the quality of life of service members and veterans who have sustained

extremity trauma or amputations. To ful

fill the mandate to conduct research, the EACE developed a Research and Surveillance

Division that complements and collaborates with outstanding DoD, VA, and academic research programs across

the globe. The EACE researchers have efforts in four key research focus areas relevant to extremity trauma and

amputation: (1) Novel Rehabilitation Interventions, (2) Advanced Prosthetic and Orthotic Technologies, (3) Epidemiology

and Surveillance, and (4) Medical and Surgical Innovations. This overview describes the EACE efforts to innovate,

discover, and translate knowledge gleaned from collaborative research partnerships into clinical practice and policy.

INTRODUCTION

In 2009, Congress legislated the creation of the Extremity

Trauma and Amputation Center of Excellence (EACE) as a

joint enterprise between the Department of Defense (DoD)

and Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) to optimize the

quality of life (QoL) of service members and veterans who

sustain extremity trauma or amputation.

1

Congress directed



the EACE to implement a comprehensive plan and strategy,

conduct clinically relevant research, foster collaborations, and

build partnerships across multidisciplinary international,

federal, and academic networks. In accordance with this

mandate, the EACE

’s mission is focused on the mitigation,

treatment, and rehabilitation of traumatic extremity injuries and

amputations. The purpose of this editorial is to provide an over-

view of the EACE efforts to innovate, discover, and translate

knowledge gleaned from collaborative research partnerships

across established DoD, VA, and academic research programs.

BACKGROUND

At the time of the

first EACE staff hire in September 2011,

the U.S. military was engaged in nearly 10 years of continu-

ous combat. As of October 1, 2015, data compiled from the

Expeditionary Medical Encounter Database, Naval Health

Research Center, indicate that approximately 26,000 trau-

matic extremity injuries resulted from deployments during

Operations Enduring Freedom (OEF), Iraqi Freedom, (OIF)

and New Dawn (OND). These injuries ranged in severity and

complexity, with nearly 50% involving the lower limbs.

2

From 2001 to 2015, 1,687 individuals with major limb ampu-



tations from OIF, OEF, and OND were documented in the

EACE Amputee Registry. Of these individuals, 69% suffered

a single limb loss injury and 31% lost multiple limbs. The over-

all incidence of extremity injuries from these operations is

consistent with previous wars, comprising more than half of

all combat wounds.

2

With extremity injuries sharply rising early in the con



flicts,

leadership within the DoD and VA health care systems

realized the need for specialized systems of care that could

deliver concentrated, interdisciplinary health care required by

*Extremity Trauma and Amputation Center of Excellence, 2748 Worth

Road, Suite 29, Joint Base San Antonio Fort Sam Houston, TX 78234.

†Center for the Intrepid, Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Brooke

Army Medical Center, 3551 Roger Brooke Drive, Joint Base San Antonio

Fort Sam Houston, TX 78234.

‡Naval Health Research Center, 140 Sylvester Road, San Diego,

CA 92106.

§Research and Development Section, Department of Rehabilitation,

Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, 8901 Rockville Pike, Bethesda,

MD 20889.

∥The Department of Physical and Occupational Therapy, Naval Medical

Center San Diego, 34800 Bob Wilson Drive, San Diego, CA 92134.

¶James A. Haley Veterans Administration Hospital, Center of Innovation

in Disabilities and Rehabilitation Research, 8900 Grand Oak Circle (151R),

Tampa, FL 33637.

**University of South Florida, Morsani College of Medicine, School of

Physical Therapy & Rehabilitation Sciences. 3515 E. Fletcher Avenue,

Tampa, FL 33612.

††U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs, Rehabilitation and Prosthetics

Services, 810 Vermont Avenue, NW Washington, DC 20420.

The view(s) expressed herein are those of the author(s) and do not

re

flect the official policy or position of Brooke Army Medical Center,



Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, Naval Medical Center

San Diego, James A. Haley Veterans Administration Hospital, Naval

Health Research Center, the Department of the Army, the Department of

the Navy, the Department of Defense, the Department of Veterans Affairs,

or the U.S. Government.

doi: 10.7205/MILMED-D-16-00279

MILITARY MEDICINE, Vol. 181, November/December Supplement 2016

3





Dostları ilə paylaş:
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   63


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©genderi.org 2019
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə