No Job Name



Yüklə 259,07 Kb.

səhifə1/11
tarix14.12.2017
ölçüsü259,07 Kb.
  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   10   11


A Century of Evolution: Ernst Mayr (1904–2005)

Mayr’s view of Darwin: was Darwin wrong

about speciation?

JAMES MALLET*



Galton Laboratory, Department of Biology, University College London, 4 Stephenson Way, London

NW1 2HE, UK

Received 30 January 2008; accepted for publication 30 May 2008

We commonly read or hear that Charles Darwin successfully convinced the world about evolution and natural

selection, but did not answer the question posed by his most famous book, ‘On the Origin of Species . . .’. Since the

1940s, Ernst Mayr has been one of the people who argued for this point of view, claiming that Darwin was not able

to answer the question of speciation because he failed to define species properly. Mayr undoubtedly had an important

and largely positive influence on the study of evolution by stimulating much evolutionary work, and also by promoting

a ‘polytypic species concept’ in which multiple, geographically separated forms may be considered as subspecies

within a larger species entity. However, Mayr became seduced by the symmetry of a pair of interlocking ideas: (1) that

coexistence of divergent populations was not possible without reproductive isolation and (2) reproductive isolation

could not evolve in populations that coexist. These beliefs led Mayr in 1942 to reject evidence of the importance of

intermediate stages in speciation, particularly introgression between hybridizing species, which demonstrates that

complete reproductive isolation is not necessary, and the existence of ecological races, which shows that ecological

divergence can be maintained below the level of species, in the face of gene flow. Mayr’s train of thought led him to

the view that Darwin misunderstood species, and that species were fundamentally different from subspecific varieties

in nature. Julian Huxley, reviewing similar data at the same time, came to the opposite conclusion, and argued that

these were the intermediate stages of speciation expected under Darwinism. Mayr’s arguments were, however, more

convincing than Huxley’s, and this caused a delay in the acceptance of a more balanced view of speciation for many

decades. It is only now, with new molecular evidence, that we are beginning to appreciate more fully the expected

Darwinian intermediates between coexisting species.

© The Author. Journal compilation © 2008 The Linnean

Society of London, Biological Journal of the Linnean Society, 2008, 95, 3–16.

ADDITIONAL KEYWORDS:

ecological races – essentialism – history of science – interspecific hybridization

– introgression – nominalism – philosophy of science – species concepts.

‘And this vast, this totally unprecedented change in public

opinion has been the result of the work of one man, and was

brought about in the short space of twenty years! This is the an-

swer to those who continue to maintain that “the origin of spe-

cies” is not yet discovered . . .’ (Wallace, 1889: ‘Darwinism’, p. 9)

INTRODUCTION

Today, it has become widely accepted that although

Darwin (1859) wrote a great book about evolution and

natural selection, he was mistaken about species and

therefore did not answer the question posed in the

title ‘On the Origin of Species . . .’ (hereafter The

Origin). I cannot count how many times I heard or

read statements of this sort during my own education.

Many of my colleagues and friends continue to use

this kind of assertion in their lectures, and indeed,

until the mid-1990s, I did so myself. The claim is an

old one, having first been made in various forms by

creationists and other critics of Darwin as soon as

The Origin was published, even by his ‘bulldog’ and

firm supporter, Huxley (1860), as well as by his critic

Romanes (1886). Romanes and Huxley both claimed

that Darwin had not explained the origin of sterility

and inviability of hybrids between species. The claim

was repeated by Mendelians and mutationists of the

early 20th Century, and again, even when the Modern

*E-mail: j.mallet@ucl.ac.uk



Biological Journal of the Linnean Society, 2008, 95, 3–16.

© The Author

Journal compilation © 2008 The Linnean Society of London, Biological Journal of the Linnean Society, 2008, 95, 3–16

3



Synthesis of genetics and Darwinian evolution had

been largely reconciled, the idea was revived by Gold-

schmidt (1940), who believed that species originated

by major ‘systemic mutations’ or chromosome rear-

rangements leading to major developmental changes.

Goldschmidt claimed that these macro-mutations

were unrelated to the minor genic changes found in

typical populations, although he did argue that some

such macro-mutations could also be important in

intraspecific evolution when shifts in developmental

systems were involved, such as in butterfly mimicry

(Goldschmidt, 1945). Finally, the claim was again

reiterated for still other reasons, discussed below,

during the late Modern Synthesis, as exemplified by

Mayr (1942).

One reason for the popularity of the claim that

Darwin was mistaken is undoubtedly that it is a

beautiful paradox: Darwin discovered the basis of

evolution by natural selection, but he could not apply

it himself to the origins of species, his major focus of

interest; Darwin convinced the world of evolution, but

failed to explain the title of his own book. It is a

wonderful ‘factoid’, a ‘sound-bite’ which has been used

as an aide-memoire by generations of lecturers, text-

book writers, and students. But is it really true?

I believe it is worth revisiting and critically evalu-

ating the argument that Darwin was mistaken, and

especially Ernst Mayr’s role in this claim. It is the

modern version of the claim that is so widely believed,

and through his influence on the development of

theories of speciation, Mayr has been perhaps its

most influential proponent. What exactly is the

nature of the claim about Darwin’s mistaken ideas

made by Mayr and others subsequently? What did

Darwin actually say on the matter? What does today’s

knowledge of evolutionary genetics and speciation tell

us, and are the claims of Darwin’s mistakenness

unfounded, based on today’s understanding about

evolution? I believe, and will try to demonstrate here,

that Darwin’s own arguments have been largely mis-

understood from the Modern Synthesis onwards, in

part because few evolutionary biologists today read

his book carefully, and in part because those who do

so misunderstand the nature of the arguments by

attempting to interpret Darwin’s writings in the light

of today’s viewpoints and species definitions.

There is always a danger, of course, of setting

Darwin on a pedestal. When I suggested to a col-

league that his writings had misrepresented Darwin’s

views, he replied ‘Sometimes I think that Darwin, at

least on speciation, is like the Bible: one can buttress

any view by choosing the right quotations’. I hope I

avoid this problem, and I do not believe I have had to

scour The Origin to find shreds of textual evidence

that can be used to support an extreme and unlikely

argument. Darwin clearly had many imperfections.

One of these is that his writing style was suitable

mainly for upper middle class readers in the mid 19th

Century, who had plenty of leisure, servants, and long

evenings lacking distractions of television, radio, or

internet. Although a book of 490 pages, The Origin

was intended as a mere abstract for a much longer

work. Even so, this abstract is famously ‘one long

argument’ that is both complex and discursive by

today’s standards, and also by the standards of the

war-torn 1940s during the time that Mayr was

writing. Another obvious imperfection is that Darwin

did not know any of the genetics or evolutionary

theory needed to gain today’s full understanding of

speciation. His ideas about blending inheritance were

simply wrong. He was also wrong to believe in the

inheritance of acquired characters (one aspect of

‘Lamarckian’ evolution), mainly because he was too

credulous of the supposedly reliable evidence his

animal

and


plant

breeder


correspondents

had


provided.

In spite of these deficiencies, it is remarkable how

broadly acceptable many of Darwin’s deductions and

views about speciation are turning out to be, in view

of today’s knowledge about genetics, evolution, and

ecology. I believe it is possible to discern a return to

a more Darwinian viewpoint on speciation, after a

period of approximately 40–50 years in which specia-

tion was dominated by certain views of Mayr and his

followers (Mallet, 2001b, 2005b). Herein, I argue that

Mayr’s influence was beneficial for systematics and

for the promotion of the study of evolution and spe-

ciation in general, but also at the same time blocked

adoption of a Darwinian view of species and specia-

tion, a block which we are beginning to remove only

today. I shall attempt to show that much evidence in

favour of the Darwinian view was known to Darwin

and used by him, and that even more was known by

the time of Mayr. Therefore, Mayr could have played

a very different role by integrating natural history

and systematics more closely with genetics and Dar-

winism, rather than creating an artificial division and

claiming that modern knowledge about evolution dis-

proved Darwin’s views about species.

WHAT DARWIN ACTUALLY SAID

(AND MEANT)

Darwin’s ‘one long argument’ is complex, defended

with abundant empirical evidence, as well as verbal

theory and thought experiments, and it runs through-

out The Origin. It consists of long, complex sentences,

embedded in long paragraphs, within long chapters

that each form a key component of the overall argu-

ment. It is therefore extremely hard to summarize

what Darwin was trying to say without paraphrasing

4

J. MALLET



© The Author

Journal compilation © 2008 The Linnean Society of London, Biological Journal of the Linnean Society, 2008, 95, 3–16






Dostları ilə paylaş:
  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   10   11


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©genderi.org 2017
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə