No Job Name



Yüklə 259,07 Kb.
Pdf görüntüsü
səhifə11/11
tarix14.12.2017
ölçüsü259,07 Kb.
#16324
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   10   11

although we still do not know how common they are

(Butlin, 1995; Noor, 1995; Coyne & Orr, 1997, 2004;

Via, 2001; Berlocher & Feder, 2002).

WHAT IF?


It is given mainly to naive amateur historians to

speculate what might have been. However, as I have

few credentials to lose in the history of science, I feel

free to argue that Mayr made a mistake, and to

suggest that a different approach would have been

better. He could have framed his new ideas and

syntheses as arguments which bolstered, rather than

attempting to revolutionize and in part overturn Dar-

winism. Mayr could easily have gone along with the

Darwinian idea that species were continuous with

subspecific varieties, and that varieties only had to

develop quantitative differences which could lead ulti-

mately to gaps between them. Instead, Mayr chose to

support the idea that species were fundamentally

different from varieties with special characteristics

(reproductive isolation), and that they required

special evolutionary conditions (e.g. geographic isola-

tion, genetic revolutions) for their divergence, which

subspecific evolution did not require. Speciation

became more difficult than could be achieved by

simple adaptation and character evolution, which

Darwin believed was the key to diversification. This

supposed difficulty of speciation then directly led to

the view that Darwin misunderstood the topic of his

own book.

Fundamental

differences

between


species

(as


sources of the supposed ‘reality’ of species) were

stressed by Mayr and his followers, in contrast to the

presumed unreality of subspecific varieties. There are

a number of problems with adopting Mayr’s views in

today’s most pressing debates in the evolutionary

arena. Evolutionary biology, especially in the USA

and the Muslim world, is under unprecedented threat

from the anti-science community, particularly the

self-styled ‘Intelligent Design’ supporters of modified

creationism. If species are viewed as fundamentally

distinct from subspecies and ‘varieties’, the evolution

of new species appears more mysterious and difficult

than otherwise. Speciation then supposedly is hard to

achieve, as opposed to being a natural consequence of

ordinary divergent evolution occurring within species,

as Darwin argued. Would not evolutionists be better

off in their dispute with creationists if it could be

argued that subspecies and varieties are very much

the same kinds of thing, differing only quantitatively?

To claim that there are clear boundaries or funda-

mental differences between varieties and species

seems to invalidate the most important of Darwin’s

uniformitarian arguments for evolution.

The Mayr view of species seems to argue that the

only populations with any future are ‘pure’ species,

rather than hybrid populations. Hybrids, according to

Mayr, are caused by ‘breakdowns in isolating mecha-

nisms’, and are therefore of little importance. Mayr

promoted the view that the diversification of life

would be impossible without reproductive isolation

(Mayr, 1963). These ideas of Mayr led to conservation

policy: the Endangered Species Act in the USA had a

notorious ‘hybrid policy’, in which evidence of hybrid-

ization could invalidate arguments for conservation of

groups of rare organisms. Mayr himself helped to

argue that this policy was too strict (O’Brien & Mayr,

1991). Viewed from today’s biological and ethical

standpoints, the hybrid policy seems unfairly to

favour genetic purity. Given that hybrid species might

sometimes arise and spread out as successful new

lineages, it seems sensible to avoid value judgments

on groups of organisms solely on the basis of a concept

such as the Mayrian view of species purity. Today, the

hybrid policy has been rescinded, and increasing

numbers of biologists adopt a biodiversity viewpoint

in which biological diversity at all levels is considered

important in conservation, including hybrids, subspe-

cies, and ‘evolutionarily significant units’. Imagine

now that Mayr had convinced us all of a less rigid,

more Darwinian view of species and their value;

would we not have avoided all this bother about the

over-reliance on species in conservation policy?

Ernst Mayr was hugely influential force in promot-

ing a modern view of evolution as a scientific disci-

pline from 1940 onwards. In addition, he promoted a

biological system to explain and justify wide-ranging

polytypic species (i.e. species with multiple subspe-

cies), which had a salutary effect on the history of

classification and nomenclature of organisms, and led

to a period of taxonomic stability. By contrast, the rise

of the phylogenetic species concept has led to unprec-

edented levels of taxonomic inflation, especially in

well-known groups like mammals and birds, causing

problems for the understanding of biodiversity and in

conservation (Isaac et al., 2004; Meiri & Mace, 2007).

On the other hand, the rigidity of Mayr’s species

conception, and his firm rejection of the existence of

intermediate stages in speciation have led to prob-

lems in the understanding of speciation as well as

practical problems in conservation and biodiversity.

His legacy will always be mixed.

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

I am especially grateful to Jerry Coyne, Michael

Turelli, John Wilkins, and Sandra Knapp among

others for many interesting discussions on these and

related topics. However, I am solely to blame for the

views expressed here.

14

J. MALLET



© The Author

Journal compilation © 2008 The Linnean Society of London, Biological Journal of the Linnean Society, 2008, 95, 3–16




REFERENCES

Arnold ML. 1997. Natural hybridization and evolution.

Oxford: Oxford University Press.



Berlocher SH, Feder JL. 2002. Sympatric speciation in

phytophagous insects: moving beyond controversy? Annual



Review of Entomology 47: 773–815.

Bolnick DI, Near TJ. 2005. Tempo of hybrid inviability in

centrarchid fishes (Teleostei : Centrarchidae). Evolution 59:

1754–1767.

Buerkle CA, Morris RJ, Asmussen MA, Rieseberg LH.

2000. The likelihood of homoploid hybrid speciation. Hered-

ity 84: 441–451.

Buffon G-LL. 1749. Histoire Naturelle, Générale et Particu-

lière, avec la Description du Cabinet du Roy. Paris, 2: 14.

Butlin RK. 1995. Reinforcement: an idea evolving. Trends in

Ecology and Evolution 10: 432–434.

Coyne JA, Orr HA. 1997. ‘Patterns of speciation in Droso-

phila’ revisited. Evolution 51: 295–303.



Coyne JA, Orr HA. 2004. Speciation. Sunderland, MA:

Sinauer Associates.



Darwin C. 1859. On the origin of species by means of natural

selection, or the preservation of favoured races in the

struggle for life. London: John Murray.

Dobzhansky T. 1937. Genetics and the origin of species. New

York, NY: Columbia University Press.



Drès M, Mallet J. 2002. Host races in plant-feeding insects

and their importance in sympatric speciation. Philosophical



Transactions of the Royal Society of London Series B, Bio-

logical Sciences 357: 471–492.

Feder JL, Berlocher SH, Opp SB. 1998. Sympatric host-

race formation and speciation in Rhagoletis (Diptera:

Tephritidae): a tale of two species for Charles D. In: Mopper

S, ed. Genetic structure and local adaptation in natural



insect populations. New York, NY: Chapman & Hall, 408–

441.


Futuyma DJ. 1983. Science on trial: the case for evolution.

New York, NY: Pantheon.



Futuyma DJ. 1998. Evolutionary biology, 3rd edn. Sunder-

land, MA: Sinauer.



Goldschmidt RB. 1940. The material basis of evolution. New

Haven, CT: Yale University Press.



Goldschmidt RB. 1945. Mimetic polymorphism, a controver-

sial chapter of Darwinism. Quarterly Review of Biology 20:

147–164.

Huxley J. 1942. Evolution. The modern synthesis. London:

George Allen & Unwin Ltd.



Huxley TH. 1860. The origin of species. In: Huxley TH, ed.

Collected essays. Lectures to working men (republished

1899). London: Macmillan & Co, 22–79.



Isaac NJB, Mallet J, Mace GM. 2004. Taxonomic inflation:

its influence on macroecology and conservation. Trends in



Ecology and Evolution 19: 464–469.

Jiggins CD, Emelianov I, Mallet J. 2005. Assortative

mating and speciation as pleiotropic effects of ecological

adaptation: examples in moths and butterflies. In: Fellowes

M, ed. Insect evolutionary ecology. London: Royal Entomo-

logical Society, 451–473.

Jiggins CD, Mallet J. 2000. Bimodal hybrid zones and

speciation. Trends in Ecology and Evolution 15: 250–255.



Jordan K. 1905. Der Gegegensatz zwischen geographischer

unt nichtgeographischer Variation. Zeitschrift für Wissen-



schaftliche Zoologie 83: 151–210.

Kohn D. 2008. Darwin’s keystone: the principle of divergence.

In: Richards RJ, Ruse M, eds. Cambridge companion to the



origin of species. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Krementsov NL. 1994. Dobzhansky and Russian entomol-

ogy: the origin of his ideas on species and speciation. In:

Adams MB, ed. The evolution of theodosius dobzhansky.

Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 31–48.



Mallet J. 1995. A species definition for the Modern Synthesis.

Trends in Ecology and Evolution 10: 294–299.

Mallet J. 2001a. Subspecies, semispecies, and superspecies.

In: Levin SA, ed. Encyclopedia of biodiversity. San Diego,

CA: Academic Press, 523–526.

Mallet J. 2001b. The speciation revolution. Journal of Evo-

lutionary Biology 14: 887–888.

Mallet J. 2004. Poulton, Wallace and Jordan: how discoveries

in Papilio butterflies initiated a new species concept 100

years ago. Systematics and Biodiversity 1: 441–452.

Mallet J. 2005a. Hybridization as an invasion of the genome.

Trends in Ecology and Evolution 20: 229–237.

Mallet J. 2005b. Speciation in the 21st century. Review of

‘Speciation’, by Jerry A. Coyne & H. Allen Orr. Heredity 95:

105–109.

Mallet J. 2006. What has Drosophila genetics revealed about

speciation? Trends in Ecology and Evolution 21: 386–393.



Mallet J. 2007. Hybrid speciation. Nature 446: 279–283.

Mallet J. 2008a. Hybridization, ecological races, and the

nature of species: empirical evidence for the ease of specia-

tion. Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of

London Series B, Biological Sciences 363: DOI: 10.1098/

rstb.2008.0081.



Mallet J. 2008b. Wallace and the species concept of the early

Darwinians. In: Smith CR, Beccaloni GW, eds. Natural



selection and beyond: the intellectual legacy of Alfred Russell

Wallace. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Mayr E. 1940. Speciation phenomena in birds. American

Naturalist 74: 249–278.

Mayr E. 1942. Systematics and origin of species. New York,

NY: Columbia University Press.



Mayr E. 1959. Isolation as an evolutionary factor. Proceed-

ings of the American Philosophical Society 103: 221–230.

Mayr E. 1963. Animal species and evolution. Cambridge, MA:

Harvard University Press.



Mayr E. 1982. The growth of biological thought. Diversity,

evolution, and inheritance. Cambridge, MA: Belknap.

Mayr E. 1999. Systematics and the origin of species, reprinted

ed. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.



Meiri S, Mace GM. 2007. New taxonomy and the origin of

species. PLoS Biology 5: e194.



Noor MAF. 1995. Speciation driven by natural selection in

Drosophila. Nature (London) 375: 674–675.



O’Brien SJ, Mayr E. 1991. Bureaucratic mischief: recognizing

endangered species and subspecies. Science 251: 1187–

1188.

WAS DARWIN WRONG?



15

© The Author

Journal compilation © 2008 The Linnean Society of London, Biological Journal of the Linnean Society, 2008, 95, 3–16



Orr HA, Turelli M. 2001. The evolution of postzygotic isola-

tion: accumulating Dobzhansky-Muller incompatibilities.



Evolution 55: 1085–1094.

Popper KR. 1945. The open society and its enemies, 5th edn.

London: Routledge.



Poulton EB. 1904. What is a species? Proceedings of the

Entomological Society of London 1903: lxxvii–cxvi.

Price TD, Bouvier MM. 2002. The evolution of F1 post-

zygotic incompatibilities in birds. Evolution 56: 2083–

2089.

Romanes GJ. 1886. Physiological selection; an additional

suggestion on the origin of species. Journal of the Linnean



Society Zoology 19: 337–411.

Rothschild M. 1983. Dear Lord Rothschild. Birds, butterflies

and history. London: Hutchinson.

Schluter D, Nagel LM. 1995. Parallel speciation by natural

selection. American Naturalist 146: 292–301.



Seehausen O. 2004. Hybridization and adaptive radiation.

Trends in Ecology and Evolution 19: 198–207.

Stresemann E. 1975. Ornithology. From Aristotle to the

present. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.

Sulloway FJ. 1979. Geographic isolation in Darwin’s think-

ing: the vicissitudes of a crucial idea. Studies in the History



of Biology 3: 23–65.

Tilman D, Knops J, Wedin D, Reich P. 2002. Plant diver-

sity and composition: effects on productivity and nutrient

dynamics of experimental grasslands. In: Loreau M, ed.

Biodiversity and ecosystem functioning. Synthesis and per-

spectives. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 21–35.

Vandermeer J. 1981. The interference production principle:

an ecological theory for agriculture. Bioscience 31: 361–

365.

Via S. 2001. Sympatric speciation in animals: the ugly duck-

ling grows up. Trends in Ecology and Evolution 16: 381–

390.

Wallace AR. 1865. On the phenomena of variation and geo-

graphical distribution as illustrated by the Papilionidae of

the Malayan region. Transactions of the Linnean Society of

London 25: 1–71.

Wallace AR. 1889. Darwinism. An exposition of the theory of

natural selection with some of its applications. London:

MacMillan & Co.



Wilson R. 1999. Species: new interdisciplinary essays. Cam-

bridge, MA: MIT Press.

16

J. MALLET



© The Author

Journal compilation © 2008 The Linnean Society of London, Biological Journal of the Linnean Society, 2008, 95, 3–16




Yüklə 259,07 Kb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   10   11




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©genderi.org 2023
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə