Overuse of Antibiotics for uris: Who is to Blame? Investigators: Julia Dweck pa-s, Asya Gutman pa-s, Maykl Sher pa-s, Alyssa Spinosa pa-s, Jessica Teresco pa-s advisors: Nora Lowy, PhD, mpa, pa-c & Jenny Sena, ms, pa-c



Yüklə 22,74 Kb.

tarix05.10.2018
ölçüsü22,74 Kb.


 

Overuse of Antibiotics for URIs: Who is to Blame? 

Investigators: Julia Dweck PA-S, Asya Gutman PA-S, Maykl Sher PA-S,  

Alyssa Spinosa PA-S, Jessica Teresco PA-S 

Advisors: Nora Lowy, PhD, MPA, PA-C & Jenny Sena, MS, PA-C 

 

 

 



 

 

Antibiotic  resistance  is  on  the  rise  in  the  United 



States, however, many medical providers continue 

to  prescribe  antibiotics  for  upper  respiratory  tract 

infections  (URIs)  despite  the  fact  that  bacteria 

account for only 25% of URIs (Longo et al., 2012). 

Even  in  cases  where  bacteria  are  the  cause,  URIs 

are  commonly  self-limiting  diseases  and  rarely 

progress to serious complications (NICE, 2008). 

 

INTRODUCTION 

(Q

1

) Is there a difference in knowledge of antibiotic use for URIs between patients and 



providers? 

(Q

2



) Is there a correlation between patient and provider ‘perception/behavior’ regarding 

antibiotic use for URIs?  

(Q

3

)  Is  there  a  correlation  between  knowledge  and  ‘perception/behavior’  of  antibiotic 



use for URIs? 

 

 



(H

1

) There is a difference in knowledge of antibiotic use for URIs between patients and 



providers. 

(H

2



) There is a correlation between patient and provider ‘perception/behavior’ regarding 

antibiotic use for URIs. 

(H

3

) There is a correlation between knowledge and ‘perception/behavior’   of antibiotic 



use for URIs. 

Approved by: Wagner College Human 

Experimentation Review Board (HERB)  

Study Population: Providers and Patients 

Distributed at: Medical facilities, Wagner College 

campus, and online (SurveyMonkey, Social media)  

Instrument Design: Demographics and thirty-nine 

5-point Likert scale items consisting of 13 

knowledge, 13 perception, and 13 behavior items

 

BACKGROUND 



RESULTS 

RESEARCH QUESTIONS 

HYPOTHESES 

STUDY DESIGN 

There is in fact a difference in knowledge of antibiotic use for URIs between patients 

and providers. There is also a difference between patient and providers perception and 

behavior  regarding  antibiotic  use  for  URIs.  With  respect  to  patients,  there  is  a 

correlation between knowledge and perception and behavior of antibiotic use, while on 

the  other  hand,  with  respect  to  providers,  there  is  no  correlation  between  knowledge, 

and perception and behavior of antibiotic use. Proper patient education should focus on 

improving knowledge regarding antibiotics and their indications, while proper provider 

education should focus on eliminating misconception regarding patients’ expectations. 

CONCLUSION 

Wider regional distribution 

Increased patient/provider diversity  

Limit to private practice providers 

Focus on patients’ request for any prescriptions, not 

only antibiotics 



FUTURE STUDIES 

There was a difference in knowledge of antibiotic use between patients (k=3.5/5.0) and 

providers  (k=4.4/5.0)  with  a  p-value  of  <0.001.  There  were  also  differences  in 

‘perception/behavior’  regarding  antibiotic  use  (20/26  items)  with  p-values  of  <0.05. 

With respect to patients, there was a positive correlation between their knowledge and 

‘perception/behavior’  (19/26  items)  with  p-values  of  <0.05.  On  the  other  hand,  with 

respect  to  providers,  there  were  only  3/26  items  correlating  between  knowledge  and 

‘perception/behavior’ of antibiotic use. 

 

 

 



Each  year  in  the  United  States,  at  least  2  million 

people  become  infected  with  bacteria  that  are 

resistant to antibiotics and at least 23,000 people die 

each  year  as  a  direct  result  of  these  infections.”                     

 

 



 

 

 



 

   CDC, 2016 

 

“….antibiotic  resistance  is  no  longer  a  prediction 



for the future; it is happening right now… putting at 

risk  the  ability  to  treat  common  infections  in  the 

community  and  hospital.” 

   


 

         

 

                                               WHO, 2014 



  

Respiratory tract infections are the most common 



reasons for prescribing antibacterial agents in 

developed countries, representing about 75% of all 

prescriptions in community practice.” 

 

 



 

 

 



      Turnidge, 2001 

 



Globally, antibiotic resistance is being recognized 

as  a  major  healthcare  issue…  A  major  concern  is 

the inappropriate use of antibiotics for non-bacterial 

infections and for self-limiting clinical conditions.” 

 

 

 



    Kotwani & Holloway, 2014 

LITERATURE REVIEW  

Antibiotics  are  a  class  of  drugs  used  solely  to  treat 

bacteria  and  have  no  effect  on  viruses.  One  of  the  1

st

 



antibiotics ever produced was penicillin. It was discovered 

by Alexander Fleming in 1928. It was widely used during 

WW2  to  treat  soldiers’  battlefield  wound  infections  and 

pneumonia. Over the decades, antibiotics have been used 

for  the  treatment  all  kinds  of  infections.  The  widespread 

use of antibiotics has led us to a major problem known as 

antibiotic  resistance.  The  overabundance  of  antibiotics 

prescribed  for  uncomplicated  URIs  has  become  a  great 



concern in the United States. 


Dostları ilə paylaş:


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©genderi.org 2017
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə